Author Topic: Residential schools  (Read 620 times)

90sRetroFan

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Residential schools
« on: June 11, 2021, 03:40:42 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/canadas-residential-schools-stole-childhoods-152832740.html

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Tortured, beaten, and forced to live a regimented lifestyle that denied their indigenous culture -- these three siblings are survivors of Canadian residential schools.
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Linda recalls how their long hair, which often had spiritual significance, was cut upon arrival.

"And they cut my hair off, and I looked at my hair… and it was so devastating. And then they washed us, put this DDT [chemical insecticide] on us, and I had headaches for a long time, and sometimes still have headaches."
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I used to throw up, and my cousin would throw up too, and then they'd make us eat our vomit. And for many years, I still have ulcers because of that."
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The schools operated between 1831 and 1996 and removed about 150,000 indigenous children from their families.
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"Because I was young, so I got tortured, I got beaten up and you name it as a young child."
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Pope Francis said on Sunday he was pained by last month's discovery, but he did not apologize.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2022, 08:02:57 pm by 90sRetroFan »

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90sRetroFan

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2021, 12:02:58 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/kamloops-indigenous-burial-children-215-national-indigenous-peoples-day-170421732.html

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It was only recently, by mere chance, that Tori Cress found documentation to prove what she had known for a long time: that her mother had been forced to attend a day school in her youth, where she experienced abuse from which she continues to heal today.

Until then, Cress, an Anishnaabe and Pottawatome Kwe from Beausoleil First Nation and the co-founder of Idle No More-Ontario, had been dealing with feelings of “rage and anger” after hearing the devastating news of 215 Indigenous children — some as young as three years old — found in a mass grave in a former residential school. In late May, the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation had announced the finding at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, in British Columbia, during a survey of its grounds, according to a CBC report.

Unable to bear the countless stories that people shared of parents who’d fallen victims to Canada's Indian Residential School system and the ongoing trauma that’s part of it, Cress stayed off social media.

But something clicked the day she found her mother’s name in the day school attendance records — “in black and white” — with a note beside it, reading: “disciplined.” Cress says it was then that she overcame her anger as she began to put a lot of things about her “estranged” mother into perspective.

“What they call discipline...I know is abuse,” she said.

“All of these things in my life were making sense to me, and the trauma that (my mother) grew up in. She was born into grief and trauma and mourning, just like I was, and just like her mother was.”

According to University of British Columbia research, “like residential schools, (Indian Day Schools) were places (where) students experienced many types of abuse, including but not limited to physical, verbal, and sexual.” The main difference was that they returned to their homes and communities at night. A Queen’s University Gazette review of a historical biography titled Spirit of the Grassroots People: Seeking Justice for Indigenous Survivors of Canada’s Colonial Education System, estimates there were 200,000 Indigenous children “forced” into these schools from the “mid-1800s until 2000.”

The Kamloops residential school where the children were found operated until 1969, at which time the federal government took it over from the Catholic Church and turned it to a day school until 1978.
...
The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation estimates more than 150,000 children were forced into residential schools. And the TRC itself had requested $1.5 million to uncover more mass graves as early as 2009, which the federal government of Stephen Harper denied.
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According to Morgan, many undergrad and graduate students are “well aware of the history of residential schools.” However, there remains a strong generalized tendency among many to dismiss it as “an awful aberration” rather than to understand it as part of a “larger pattern of structural and systemic colonialism and racism within our history.”

Thinking of residential schools as the “products of a few racist politicians,” she insists, misses the forest for the trees.


“It’s good (that) people are questioning (John A.) MacDonald’s legacy,” she said, referring to the ongoing movement to remove statues of controversial colonial figures, including Canada’s first prime minister.

“But to see it all as emanating from one person doesn’t take into account the fact that there are larger structures and processes that were put in place to dispossess people.”
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Cress says the only way for these children’s deaths to bring about concrete change is for Canadians to “lean into their discomfort” of knowing the history of Canada and the ongoing effects of settler-colonialism.

Wilful ignorance, she says, is no excuse.
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After publicly expressing grief and heartbreak at the news just days after the announcement from Kamloops, BC, Federal Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau vowed “concrete action.” He promised “many, many discussions to be had in the coming days and weeks about how we can best support these communities and get to the truth.”

Schools and buildings are likewise flying flags at half-mast, and candlelight vigils are being held. The government has also established a National Indian Residential School Crisis Line for people to call in, and more than 220,000 people are calling on the government to declare a national day of mourning, according to a petition on change.org.

But after being on the frontlines all this time, Cress sees it all as “showmanship, not action.” The conversations and discussions have been had, reports have been produced and calls to action have been made to no avail, she says.

What is needed is action.

“And that equals dollars. That equals resources. Stop...(extracting) our resources and go extract our children from their unmarked graves. That’s the healing we need,” she said.

I agree that what is needed is action. I disagree that action equals dollars. Serious action equals eliminating all colonialist bloodlines from Canada. No matter how many dollars you have, you will not be able to pay racists to voluntarily stop reproducing. Only state control over reproduction can achieve this.

(But if you have dollars, spend them on:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/firearms/

which at least have the potential to do some attrition.)


90sRetroFan

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2021, 10:25:30 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/relatives-went-catholic-school-native-102336503.html

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My relatives went to a Catholic school for Native children. It was a place of horrors

There is so much mourning Native people have yet to do. The full magnitude of Native suffering has yet to be entirely understood, especially when it comes to the nightmarish legacies of American Indian boarding schools. The purpose of the schools was “civilization”, but, as I have written elsewhere, boarding schools served to provide access to Native land, by breaking up Native families and holding children hostage so their nations would cede more territory. And one of the primary benefactors of the boarding school system is the Catholic church, which is today the world’s largest non-governmental landowner, with roughly 177 million acres of property throughout the globe. Part of the evidence of how exactly the church acquired its wealth in North America is literally being unearthed, and it exists in stories of the Native children whose lives it stole, which includes my own family.

Last month, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation made a grisly discovery of 215 children’s remains at a burial site next to the former Kamloops Indian residential school in British Columbia. The news sent shockwaves through Indian Country. On Tuesday, the US interior secretary, Deb Haaland, announced that her department would lead an investigation into “the loss of human life and lasting consequences” of federal Indian boarding schools. Although it’s unclear whether the scope of the investigation will include church-run schools, it should because many of the Catholic-run schools received federal trust money set aside for Native education.

On Thursday morning, a relative calls me as more terrible news breaks: the Cowessess First Nation has discovered 751 unmarked graves at the site of the former Marieval Indian residential school in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both Marieval and Kamloops began as Catholic-run schools.

For my relative (who wishes to remain anonymous) the death and grief came after he left St Joseph’s Indian school in Chamberlain, South Dakota, which he attended from 1968 to 1977. “A lot of people ended up killing themselves,” he says of friends and classmates who attended the Catholic-run school. My uncle, also a survivor of St Joseph’s, took his own life at the age of 23 in 1987, when I was just two.

My relative calls St Joseph’s “a smorgasbord” for pedophiles and rapists who preyed on and terrorized Native children. He describes beatings and nights of terror as priests took their pick of the children as they slept. The abuse was worse for the girls, who were sometimes impregnated by their rapists, he tells me. His experience was not unique and has been documented elsewhere by journalists and scholars.

Despite the evidence, there is an active conspiracy to silence survivors and whitewash history. South Dakota passed laws to prevent survivors from seeking damages against the church.

Eight plaintiffs sued the Sioux Falls diocese in 2010 for alleged **** and sexual abuse they had experienced in the 1970s at the hands of multiple members of the clergy and one staff member. (The photograph of one of the men still hangs on the wall of St Joseph’s in the hallway of its school museum, visible to the children and visitors who pass it.)

Just days before the survivors were set to go to court in 2010, the then Republican governor of South Dakota, Mike Rounds (now a US senator), signed a bill into law prohibiting anyone 40 years or older from recovering damages from institutions responsible for their abuse, except from individual perpetrators themselves. The act crushed the lawsuit, effectively shielding the Catholic church from any responsibility or accountability.

The bill was written and proposed by Steven Smith, a Chamberlain attorney who, according to the Argus Leader, was representing the Priests of the Sacred Heart, the founders of St Joseph’s Indian school, in several sexual abuse cases at the time. Smith accused the survivors of being motivated by money and costing the church undue expenses in legal fees. The lawsuits were a “ticket out of squalor” for the survivors, Smith told the Huffington Post in 2011.
...
I ask my my relative if money motivated him to take up the lawsuit against the church. He lets out a sigh and tells me how his lifelong friend who was a survivor of St Joseph’s recently died. He hints the death was related to addiction. “No one cares about Indians,” he tells me. “That’s why they got away with what they did.” It’s also easy to dismiss the survivors of abuse who live with the lifelong impacts. A church tactic is hoping the Native survivors will just vanish.

The last time I visited St Joseph’s was in 2019. Pictures of the clergy and staff accused of **** and sexual abuse still hung on the walls of the school’s museum, as if the institution were either proud or in denial of its history – I couldn’t quite tell. I tried to imagine the school from the perspective of my relative as a young child, and all I felt was a deep, silent anger.

Nowhere was there an acknowledgment of the stories like my relative’s. It was as if he and other children like him were just ghosts haunting the hallways.

I ask my relative what justice would look like. There’s a pause. He tells me he’s not interested in apologies. The school, he says, was a “child brothel” when he was there, and it deserves to be remembered for such atrocities. He would like to see St Joseph’s “turned into a school run for and by Native people” not for the profit of the church.

NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.

What justice would look like? This done to all Catholic colonialists (including Francis) would be a good start:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captives_in_American_Indian_Wars

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Common torture techniques included burning the captive, which was done one hot coal at a time, rather than on firewood pyres; beatings with switches or sticks, jabs from sharp sticks as well as genital mutilation and flaying while still alive. Captives' fingernails were ripped out. Their fingers were broken, then twisted and yanked by children. Captives were made to eat pieces of their own flesh, and were scalped and skinned alive. Such was the fate of Jamestown Governor John Ratcliffe. The genitalia of male captives were the focus of considerable attention, culminating with the dissection of the genitals one slice at a time. To make the torture last longer, the Native Americans and the First Nations would revive captives with rest periods during which time they were given food and water. Tortures typically began on the lower limbs, then gradually spread to the arms, then the torso. The Native Americans and the First Nations spoke of "caressing" the captives gently at first, which meant that the initial tortures were designed to cause pain, but only minimal bodily harm. By these means, the execution of a captive, especially an adult male, could take several days and nights.[13]

90sRetroFan

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2021, 10:22:16 pm »
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jul/01/this-canada-day-lets-remember-this-country-was-built-on-genocide

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People across the country are waking up to the reality that Canada is a country built on the violent dispossession of Indigenous peoples. The horrifying reports of unmarked graves of children at residential “schools” in Kamloops, British Columbia, Brandon, Manitoba, and most recently Cowessess First Nation in Saskatchewan have shocked many Canadians and others around the world. However, these were not discoveries, but confirmations of what we knew all along: Canada was built on genocide.
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This isn’t ancient history. Nowhere is this more true than in Nunavut, the territory I represent in Canada’s parliament. Until around the 1950s, Inuit lived as they had for thousands of years. Then the Canadian state expanded its presence in the north and colonized the Arctic as part of their drive for natural resources and to claim sovereignty over lands and waters. We were forced into squalid settlements, sled dogs were shot by the Mounties, and children were sent to residential schools that were meant to eradicate Indigenous culture. These joint projects of church and state were hotspots for child abuse and sexual assault carried out by priests and school administrators, most of whom have escaped justice for their crimes.
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These are the things I think of when I think of Canada Day. A history of violence that is not over. This is why I can’t imagine celebrating this country until so many things change. Indigenous people can come to their own conclusions about how they mark this date, but for those of you who are settlers on these lands I am urging you to take this day to learn, to reflect and most importantly to act.

Before I was elected as an MP, I gave a speech in the House of Commons as part of a mock parliament for young women. I spoke of the toll that the suicide crisis has taken on my community and of my lost friends, classmates and teammates and asked, “where are our non-Indigenous allies?” As I ask that question again today, I see more of you and more Canadians from all walks of life waking up and showing up. This is a good shift. Indigenous peoples cannot and should not shoulder these burdens alone. They were imposed on us by Canada, and we need Canadians to play an active role in dismantling them. That means staying angry and standing alongside us to amplify our voices. Above all else, it means listening to us and actually changing things when we tell you that we are hurting.

A good place to start is by getting familiar with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Qikiqtani Truth Commission. Talk to your friends and neighbours about the need for real Indigenous justice in Canada. When Indigenous groups organize protests and marches, show up and support them. And make sure your elected representatives know that they will never be re-elected if they are silent in the face of injustice. Sooner or later, when we have an election in this country, refuse to vote for political leaders who talk the talk without walking the walk.

Where are your allies? Many of them are trying to immigrate to Canada from other former Western colonies around the world. Let them in so they can start helping you!

90sRetroFan

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2021, 10:21:18 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/native-children-didn-t-lose-102025259.html

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Native children didn’t ‘lose’ their lives at residential schools. Their lives were stolen

Yes! And by which civilization?

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Many of us understand everyday Canadian schools themselves to be violent institutions of assimilation and colonization. In my predominantly Indigenous urban elementary school in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, I grew up singing O Canada and God Save the Queen at assemblies. In the lunchroom, Johnny Appleseed, a biblical song about a Christian god’s benevolence, was to be recited before we were allowed to eat our school-provided meals. Still, the terms “residential school” – and the US equivalent, “boarding school” – are deeply inadequate. These “residential schools”, “day schools”, and “boarding schools” were prisons. These were forced labour camps.

See also:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/childcare-issues/msg6188/#msg6188

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I recall hearing of Cree people, including small children, forced to work on sugar beet farms in brutal summer heat. This was a common practice from the 1940s to at least the 1980s: farmers lured dispossessed and hungry Indigenous people into seasonal labor with false promises, then forced the workers to labor 12-14 hour days with little or no pay. They slept in trucks, tents or empty grain bins. If they ventured into nearby towns, they were chased away with bats. If they tried to leave, their children might be taken away.

Some of the stories we are told about residential schooling prisons involve Native children digging graves for other children. Rarely did our ancestors receive proper burials or grave markers. The soils of these lands have always known our hands, as gardeners, as workers; these lands hold our bodies and the bodies of our ancestors. The soil that lies underneath so-called Canada has been hell and it has been refuge.

One thing is clear: Native children’s lives are never “lost”; they are deliberately and violently stolen. Similarly, the lands of Indigenous people – from Canada to the US and beyond – are never “lost”; they have been and continue to be forcibly colonized. The words we use matter for Native life because these words define the past, the present, and the possible. Reckoning with the gentle language Canadians have been taught to use to describe the violence of empire is one part of the process of undoing colonization.

In our communities, the accounting of Indigenous death feels relentless. We hear and see and feel the growing toll of graves uncovered: ever-higher numbers recited seemingly hundreds of times daily on nearly every Canadian news network. Endless repetitions of the phone numbers of Residential Schooling Crisis lines to connect the grieving with mental health counselors. None of it is enough.

I refuse to play the numbers game. Our grief and our lives are not reducible to numbers or statistics. As the Twitter user @awahihte put it, “Kamloops is not a unit of measurement.” And to whose gaze are we appealing when we repeat these numbers over and over and over, hoping to evoke empathy from a settler state that cannot feel?

No, you are appealing to the gaze of OTHER COLONIZED PEOPLES FROM AROUND THE WORLD who experienced the same (if not worse) at the hands of the same Western colonial empires. Only together can we kill Western civilization.

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Meanwhile, as Indigenous people, we are struck in the heart by those numbers, every single time. There is simply no calculus that can account for the lives of each child stolen by colonialism’s violence – all the moments of joy, curiosity, play and learning that make childhood such a wondrous time; these things are immeasurable and immaterial. The lived experience of Indigenous childhood is irreducible to any European notion of property, and this is precisely why it is a threat to the colonial order.

Exactly, which is why demanding financial reparations is the wrong approach, one that degrades the victims by implying that they can be violated so long as the price is right. Our only demand should be for elimination of colonialist bloodlines and of Western civilization itself.

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Since time immemorial, many Indigenous peoples around the world have used fire to rejuvenate the land and restore order to the natural world. The lesson is that sometimes, things must burn for the soil to heal and become healthy once more. As monuments and statues to colonial figures are toppled, and as Black and Indigenous communities continue to resist and heal, another world is becoming possible. In the next world that we are building on these lands our ancestors knew so well, no child will have their formative years violently stolen away by colonialism. They will be free. We will be free.

And Western civilization will be dead. But talking alone will not achieve this. Therefore make sure every victim of colonialism owns:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/firearms/
« Last Edit: July 20, 2021, 09:42:00 pm by 90sRetroFan »

Zea_mays

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2021, 08:59:42 am »
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'Burn it all down': Head of B.C. civil liberties group resigns over tweet about church fires

 The head of the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association — one of the most significant civil rights groups in the country — has left her job following an uproar after a social media post that seemed to celebrate the burning of Catholic churches.

In late June, Harsha Walia quote-tweeted a Vice news report regarding Catholic churches that had been burned, following the discoveries of hundreds of unmarked graves near the sites of former residential schools.

“Burn it all down,” Walia wrote.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/burn-it-all-down-head-of-bc-civil-liberties-group-resigns-over-tweet-about-church-fires/ar-AAMjKmb

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Ten churches have been vandalised in Alberta, Canada, in attacks that police have linked to anger over historic injustices against indigenous people.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-57690737.amp

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Indian_residential_school_gravesites

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“It is readily acknowledged that Indian children lose their natural resistance to illness by habitating so closely in these schools, and that they die at a much higher rate than in their villages. But this alone does not justify a change in the policy of this Department, which is being geared towards the final solution of our Indian Problem." -Duncan Campbell Scott, former Superintendent of Indian Education (1909-1913) and Deputy Superintendent General of Indian Affairs (1913-1932)



I wonder what the SJWs vandalizing and burning these churches think about the SJWs who vandalized and burned synagogues 90 years ago.


guest55

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Re: Colonial Crimes
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2021, 12:19:11 pm »
Thousands of Kids Died in Residential Schools, Now They're Being Found
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The discovery of more than 200 unmarked graves of Indigenous children at a former residential school in Canada exposed the horrific scale of abuses that took place inside the country’s residential school system. Now, the country is experiencing a reckoning.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVogX0-5RLk

90sRetroFan

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guest55

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Re: Diplomatic decolonization
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2022, 08:33:04 pm »
Métis delegates hold news conference in Rome following meeting with Pope Francis – March 28, 2022
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Métis National Council delegates speak with reporters in Rome, Italy, following their meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican. Speaking with reporters are Cassidy Caron (president of the Métis National Council), Mitchell Case (Region 4 councillor with the Metis Nation of Ontario), Pixie Wells (president of the Fraser Valley Métis Association). Also taking part are Archbishop Donald J. Bolen (archdiocese of Regina) and Reverend Raymond Poisson (president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops). First Nations, Métis, and Inuit delegations that include elders, knowledge keepers, and residential school survivors are participating in a series of meetings with the Pope this week as part of an effort to secure a papal apology for the Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential school system.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgvPuA3EBgI

90sRetroFan

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Re: Canada residential schools
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2022, 03:31:57 am »
https://us.yahoo.com/news/apology-fell-short-pope-francis-135333684.html

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The Apology that Fell Short: Pope Francis Did Not Go Far Enough
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The pope’s apology actually specifies those responsible for all the abuse to say “a number of Catholics.”

A few paragraphs later, he actually defends the “good and decent believers, who in the name of the faith, and with respect, love and kindness, have enriched your history with the Gospel.”

The apology did not go far enough and fell short of admission by the Catholic Church of wrongdoing on its part.

While condemning a number of Catholics, he suggests the good that the “good and decent believers” somehow placates the evil—that included physical, emotional, sexual abuse—done by others.

“To be honest the apology by #Pontifex reads more like a carefully worded statement made by the CEO of a major corporation after announcing the settlement of a class-action lawsuit in which the company paid a fine and admitted bad things happened but claimed zero institutional responsibility,” Native American author and activist Mark Charles (Navajo) wrote on his Facebook page.

The apology was lacking. It would have been more meaningful had Pope Francis said he was apologizing for the entire Catholic Church on behalf of all Catholics.

I agree. Nothing has changed:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/colonialism-as-viewed-by-westerners/msg12408/#msg12408

So when do we destroy the Vatican?

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2022, 08:07:09 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/u-counts-indian-boarding-school-160002323.html

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At least 500 Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian children died while attending Indian boarding schools run or supported by the U.S. government, a highly anticipated Interior Department report said Wednesday. The report identified over 400 schools and more than 50 gravesites and said more gravesites would likely be found.

The report is the first time in U.S. history that the government has attempted to comprehensively research and acknowledge the magnitude of the horrors it inflicted on Native American children for decades. But it falls well short of some independent estimates of deaths and does not address how the children died or who was responsible. The report also sheds little new light on the physical and sexual abuse generations of Indigenous children endured at the schools, which were open for more than 150 years, starting in the early 1800s.
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Interior Secretary Deb Haaland's grandparents were both 8 years old when they were forced to attend boarding school, she said Wednesday at a news conference. “Many children like them never made it back to their homes. Each of those children is a missing family member, a person who was not able to live out their purpose on this Earth because they lost their lives as part of this terrible system,” Haaland said, holding back tears.

The trauma caused by federal Indian boarding school policies — including the separation of children as young as 4 years old from their families — dates back generations and is ongoing, Halaand said. The report is the first step toward understanding what assistance people need to overcome that trauma, she said, including mental health services and language revitalization, since children were abused and forbidden from speaking their native languages at the schools.

"Even though it’s ceased or stopped in many places, the vestiges of it is still continuing today," said James LaBelle, Sr., who is Inupiaq and a vice president of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, a nonprofit that helped compile the report and advocates for survivors of Indian boarding schools.
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“The United States doesn’t even know how many Indian students went through these institutions — let alone how many actually died in them,” said Preston S. McBride, an Indian boarding school historian and a Comanche descendent. McBride has found more than 1,000 student deaths at the four former boarding schools he has studied, and estimates the overall number of deaths could be as high as 40,000.

“Basically every school had a cemetery,” he said. “There are deaths at or deaths because of virtually every single boarding school.”

Those deaths were the result of everything from illness to abuse, McBride said, based on his review of historical records, including letters written by students, parents and administrators. Getting to the true number would take a significant amount of time and research, McBride said. “I think we have a long way to go.”

The report notes the investigation will likely "reveal the approximate number of Indian children who died at Federal Indian boarding schools to be in the thousands or tens of thousands.”
...
“It’s been an exhausting and emotional effort for them to confront this horror on a daily basis to bring this information to you,” Newland said at the news conference, pausing several times to collect himself. “This has left lasting scars for all Indigenous people. There’s not a single American Indian, Alaskan Native or Native Hawaiian in this country whose life hasn’t been affected by these schools.”
...
Beginning in the early 1800s, the U.S. government stole Native American children from their communities and forced them to attend Indian boarding schools, where they were stripped of their languages and traditions, given English names and trained to perform military drills.

NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2022, 12:46:19 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/readers-writers-memories-indian-boarding-160800399.html

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On the the cover of Donna Council’s new book is a picture of a little Indian girl. With her big, sorrowful eyes, puzzled expression and a bottom lip that trembles with hidden tears, she is the scared, abused, confused child Council was when she was a child. Council and her four little sisters were taken from their parents and sent to Marty, the St. Paul’s Indian MIssion boarding school about 70 miles south of the family home in Mitchell, S.D.

Donna was 12 at the time and her terrible years at the school included bullying by other kids and nuns and dozens of rules that brought punishment if broken. The frightened children, who didn’t understand why they were taken from their homes, were told their parents didn’t love them and treated as though they were “just Indians.”

The U.S. government-run boarding schools for Indian children, begun in the 19th century to integrate the Indians into white society (which meant taking their land), lasted into the early 1990s in some places. Nobody knows how many children died, or were killed, in those bleak buildings that housed three generations of Indian children, some of whom committed suicide.

Yet, there was no one to protect them. The Catholic Church controlled the schools and the kids’ lives. If they survived, many grew up to feel worthless and afraid. Like Council, many later learned they had PTSD but they had stuffed their feelings The author’s mother and grandparents were in the boarding schools but never discussed their experiences. “They kept their pain deeply hidden inside,” Council writes of the generations before her.

Now, she is opening the door to let light shine into those dark corridors, dormitories and punishment rooms.

Council grew up, had two children and was a counselor for Indian youth. But that little Indian girl was always inside her. She acted like an adult, but the generational trauma from the boarding school never went away.

https://us.yahoo.com/news/federal-indian-boarding-school-system-135821322.html

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Last week's release of the report on the purposeful and deliberate plan by the federal government to destroy Native families also brought back memories of an interview I did with American Indian Movement co-founder Dennis Banks (Ojibwa) in the fall of 2009 at Grand Valley State University. During the interview, Banks recounted his experiences attending various Indian boarding schools. He told me the experience caused him to maintain an indifferent attitude towards his mother because he felt she had abandoned him during the years he attended Indian boarding schools.

Banks recalled on certain occasions, school officials would announce a mail call so that students could get mail from home. He would show up, but he never received any mail. He felt as if his mother did not love him.

Years passed by and he eventually was able to go home when he was in his late teen years. He said the first day home was awkward, but on the second day home, his mother made him a blueberry pie because she knew it was his favorite. He felt then perhaps things could return to normal. So, he began talking to her and asked her why didn’t she ever send him any letters or try to bring him home. She told him she did.

He did not believe her.

For the rest of their lives together, he told me, he would look at his mother and have a sense of indifference towards her. This feeling lasted until she died.

Decades later, while he was in his 70s, Banks saw an Internet advertisement with information about how he could obtain his own Indian boarding school records. He followed through on the offer and received several boxes with his school records.

In the boxes, Banks found 14 unopened letters from his mother. He took them to his mother’s grave, where he sat in a lawn chair reading them one by one. Inside of one of the letters was a money order to pay for a bus ticket home for him.

In that moment, Banks, one of the greatest Native American warriors of the last century, wept at his mother’s grave and asked her for forgiveness. He had been lied to by the Indian boarding school officials, not his mother.

It's OK for boarding school officials to be "white"?

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2022, 10:07:43 pm »
It's OK for swimming lessons to be "white":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxpG9RStS-M

Nothing has changed. At least the comments are woke:

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Black people stop letting and putting you children in the hands of the enemy

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If history hasn’t taught y’all Nothing else..White folks are NOT to be trusted..my goodness ppl

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When will Black people learn? Stop leaving your kids with the enemy

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My people stop leaving our babies of all ages in the care of pink folks. I honestly believe foul play with this baby.

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You can't allow these people to care for your kids, you can't trust them. #BLM

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Wow, just wow.  Her response after killing this woman's baby says everything.  The woman is evil.  She even looks evil, like Aunt Lydia's character in "The Handmaid's Tale".

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I’m willing to bet she purposely drowned him

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I wish nothing but the absolute worst for that demoniacal female in the fleshly form, so-called swimming instructor.

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Right...this thing stinks to high heaven...I absolutely feel a full scale investigation into  this "accidental " death ...I just can't trust people that don't have any accountability for their own actions...and more and more they look like this..I'm just saying

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The white ppl probably did it purposely

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How many white kids have died in her care? If none and that’s the majority then something is fishy with this. She could of just let him drown and who would know it was intentionally.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2022, 02:33:21 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/episcopalians-study-role-native-boarding-192731498.html

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A fact-finding commission of the Episcopal Church will research the history of the denomination’s role in operating boarding schools for Native American children -- part of a system the church now acknowledges was rooted in white supremacy and caused generations of trauma.
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The resolution acknowledges the boarding schools' roots in “systems of white supremacy that have oppressed Indigenous peoples."
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The U.S. Department of Interior in May issued a report that acknowledged the “traumatic and violent” means that were used in the system. It identified more than 500 student deaths but said further investigation would likely show thousands of deaths due to disease and other causes.
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n all, more than 400 boarding schools operated in the United States from the 19th to mid-20th centuries before the system ended, according to the Interior report. While a majority were government-run, the report noted that many others were church-run, and church and state collaborated closely in the project.

The Episcopal Church operated at least nine boarding schools, according to a database compiled by the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.
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Ruth Johnson, a member of the House of Deputies from the Navajoland Area Mission in the Southwest, told the convention that she still bears the traumas of attending boarding schools, including one where she was beaten.

“I could have easily been one of those that didn’t make it home," said Johnson, who is Navajo. "To this day, I still have a hard time talking about it.”

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2022, 08:44:33 pm »
https://us.yahoo.com/news/indian-boarding-schools-impacted-generations-172211719.html

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aint Francis Mission was one of more than 400 Indian boarding schools operated or funded by the federal government through the late 1960s.
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By 1926, more than 80 percent of Native school-aged children in America were attending those boarding schools, according to the Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition. Sickness, abuse, and neglect at the schools was well documented.
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Nationally, the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative Investigative Report conducted by the Department of the Interior over the course of nine months and published in May 2022 found that at least 500 Native children died at boarding schools across the country. As the investigation continues, Assistant Secretary of the Interior Bryan Newland (Bay Mills Indian Community) estimated that number will rise to the “tens of thousands.”

Beginning with President George Washington, the official policy of the federal government was to forcibly replace the Native culture with white culture under the guise of “education.”

“Indian Education: A National Tragedy—A National Challenge,” a 1969 report by the Senate Special Subcommittee on Indian Education, known as the Kennedy Report after subcommittee chair Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), describes the rationale behind the practice: “This was considered ‘advisable’ as the cheapest and safest way of subduing the Indians, of providing a safe habitat for the country’s white inhabitants, of helping the whites acquire desirable land, and of changing the Indian’s economy so that he would be content with less land. Education was a weapon by which these goals were to be accomplished.”
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Beginning in 1893, Congress authorized the Secretary of the Interior to withhold rations, including those guaranteed by treaties, to Native families whose children did not attend schools, according to the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative Investigative Report.
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Conditions at the schools varied, but corporal punishment was normal at Saint Francis.

Hollow Horn Bear remembers a brutal beating from a scholastic — a priest in training — who searched the boys as they left the dining hall to make sure they didn’t sneak any food out. He was 10 and had taken half his apple to eat later at a movie screening in the gym.

“He whaled on me 50 times for half an apple,” Hollow Horn Bear recalled. “I couldn't be on my back or sit down for days.”

Another Saint Francis survivor, Ione Quigley, told Native News Online that she didn’t even know what violence was until she showed up to Saint Francis as a sixth-grader.
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The nuns and priests “formed a social stratification within the boarding school system,” she said, drawing a pyramid on scrap paper. “The nuns and priests were on top, and then the next layer would be all the non-Natives, like the teachers, (and) the workers. The next layer would be the mixed-blood children, who were English speakers. At the very bottom layer were those of us that were brown and spoke our Native languages.”
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She recalls the girls receiving beatings from the nuns for events they had no control over: including one who habitually wet her bed, and another time when all the girls in her dormitory accidentally witnessed a nun kissing a priest outside the window.

Although she frequently endured physical and verbal abuse, Quigley said perhaps she was spared from the worst of it since her grandparents spoke English well, and threatened to report the abusive nuns to the diocese after one incident.

“The [students] who had no family or who had no one to stand up for them, I know they were abused,” she said. “Emotional abuse leaves scars on your heart. So does physical abuse—and sexual abuse, I can't even imagine. It takes away your innocence. It takes away your trust, your securities.”
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In South Dakota alone, former boarding-school students have filed more than 100 lawsuits alleging sexual abuse by clergy members. All 27 Indian boarding schools in the state were run by Christian churches.

“I am a 44-year-old man, and the boarding-school experiences have been locked up inside me all these years,” a classmate of Hollow Horn Bear who was sexually abused by a priest wrote in a 2001 letter responding to a newspaper advertisement seeking information from former boarding-school students.
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All of the more than 100 people who have filed lawsuits alleging sexual abuse at boarding schools in South Dakota said it had been done by agents of the church, mostly priests and nuns, said attorney Greg Yates, who worked on each of the cases. Some said they simultaneously experienced physical abuse.

All but two of the cases were dismissed by the trial judge before the victims had their day in court. In 2010, South Dakota amended its statute of limitations to prohibit people 40 or older from suing institutions that knew or should have known about sexual abuse. In 2011, the state  Supreme Court ruled that complaints of childhood sexual abuse against a church entity had to be filed within one year of turning eighteen.
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Dismissing all those cases, Yates told Native News Online, deprived the survivors of their access to justice “and had the effect of revictimizing these Native American victims of sexual abuse by the clergy.”

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The Department of the Interior’s investigation found that some Native children as young as 3 were sent to boarding schools.

NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.