Author Topic: Colonization of Africa  (Read 523 times)

guest5

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Colonization of Africa
« on: November 15, 2020, 02:11:32 am »
Colonization of Africa
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Let's look at a map and see a summary of the different phases of exploration, conquests and colonization of African territories by European powers, beginning from the mid-15th century.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fbb7nbIUUEM

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guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2020, 05:50:46 pm »
Slavery and Suffering - History Of Africa with Zeinab Badawi [Episode 16]
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Much is known about enslaved Africans once they arrived in the Americas and Europe, but in this episode Zeinab Badawi looks at the impact on Africa itself of one of the most evil chapters in human history: the trans Atlantic slave trade. She travels to several countries to see how, where and why this trade began in Cabo Verde in 1510. She meets a man on the Senegalese island of Goree who for 35  years has been relating the story of slavery to thousands of visitors. And leading academics tackle the controversial subject of why some Africans helped sell their fellow Africans into slavery.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajI8lkYdmAk

guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2020, 01:12:31 pm »
Colonization Fueled Ebola: Dr. Paul Farmer on “Fevers, Feuds & Diamonds” & Lessons from West Africa
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We continue our conversation with medical anthropologist Dr. Paul Farmer, whose new book, “Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds,” tells the story of his efforts to fight Ebola in 2014 and how the history of slavery, colonialism and violence in West Africa exacerbated the outbreak. “Care for Ebola is not rocket science,” says Dr. Farmer, who notes that doctors know how to treat sick patients. But the public health response was overwhelmingly focused not on care but containment, Dr. Farmer says, which “generated very painful echoes from colonial rule.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFnfKNa7q0o

A few examples of western rappers:





De Beers Gives In And Begins Selling Lab Made Diamonds
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The allure, scarcity, and high cost of diamonds has largely been controlled by De Beers. ... De Beers is known for largely controlling the $80 billion diamond industry, creating artificial scarcity in diamonds to drive up prices and control the sense of a diamond's allure.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2018/05/30/de-beers-gives-in-and-begins-selling-lab-made-diamonds/?sh=6b45d2f04636

De Beers
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The company was founded in 1888 by British businessman Cecil Rhodes, who was financed by the South African diamond magnate Alfred Beit and the London-based N M Rothschild & Sons bank.[9][10] In 1926, Ernest Oppenheimer, a German immigrant to Britain and later South Africa who had earlier founded mining company Anglo American with American financier J.P. Morgan,[11] was elected to the board of De Beers.[12] He built and consolidated the company's global monopoly over the diamond industry until his death in 1957. During this time, he was involved in a number of controversies, including price fixing and trust behaviour, and was accused of not releasing industrial diamonds for the U.S. war effort during World War II.[13][14]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Beers

Interestingly, western rappers made me despise hip-hop culture for the most part just by the imbecilic degenerate behavior of westerners and western rappers themselves. Every time I see a picture of one the first words that come to mind are sucker, idiot, and fool.

guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2021, 01:55:14 pm »
'Colonialism had never really ended': my life in the shadow of Cecil Rhodes
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After growing up in a Zimbabwe convulsed by the legacy of colonialism, when I got to Oxford I realised how many British people still failed to see how empire had shaped lives like mine – as well as their own

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It was true that Rhodes was a racist and imperialist who built a society based on racism and exploitation. But Mugabe used this history to deny the corruption of his own regime. He made white farmers the scapegoats for the country’s economic problems and tarred the opposition as un-African. He argued that the values his political rivals stood for were a cover for neoliberal policies that, like colonialism before them, would only serve to exploit Zimbabwe on behalf of the west. Real nationalism, Mugabe said, was about finishing the anti-colonial liberation struggle by taking back the land.

In 2000, bolstered by Mugabe’s rhetoric, Black war veterans began occupying commercial farmland owned by white people. The occupations spread widely across the country. They were sponsored by the ruling party, while partisan militias carried out evictions on the ground. In less than five years, the number of white farmers actually farming the land dwindled from about 4,500 to under 500, while as many as 200,000 Black farm workers lost their jobs, and often with them their homes. About 10 white farmers were killed by militias, while the number of black farm workers killed by the same militias was just under 200, with many thousands more suffering violent assaults.

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The foreign and white media soon introduced its own distortions into the crisis, portraying the occupations as a racially motivated attack against white people, and not as a violent political uprising rooted in the complex history of colonialism. At home, my father praised Mugabe and lambasted western powers as hypocrites who preached democracy but practised imperialism. He had no patience for the opposition party, whose members he saw as stooges serving the interests of white capitalists in Zimbabwe and Britain. I later came to see the land seizures as acts of political and economic grievance that answered directly to Zimbabwe’s colonial history, and to feel that, in many ways, Mugabe and my father were right: real emancipation from that history could not be accomplished if white people still owned more than their share of the land.
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2021/jan/14/rhodes-must-fall-oxford-colonialism-zimbabwe-simukai-chigudu?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Real emancipation from Western colonial history cannot be accomplished as long as "white" identity exists.

guest5

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Yasuke: Story of the African Samurai in Japan
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RZaHgXEhJ4

When the narrator of the above video speaks of Jesuits and Christianity he more specifically is referring to Judeo-Greco-Christian culture.

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In Spanish America, Jesuits became agents of colonization as mission culture integrated frontier communities into the Spanish imperial system
https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199730414/obo-9780199730414-0147.xml

Portuguese Colonialism
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The kingdom of Portugal lasted nearly eight centuries, from the Middle Ages, to the Renaissance, to the Age of Discovery, and into the 20th century. Its location on the hilly Iberian peninsula was not known for fertile soil, leading both Spain and Portugal to become seafaring countries that dominated the world by ship. Both countries established settlements along their trade routes that disseminated their architecture on the shores of Africa, Madeira, the Americas, and Asia. The kingdom soon reaped the benefits of colonization by enslaving Africans and native peoples to mine its territories for natural resources, including gold, precious stones, wood, ivory, silver, ebony. This influx of wealth to Portugal led to expansive building programs around the world. Though, after extravagant spending campaigns and revolutions, the royals were in exile for the final time in 1910. Today, Portugal is a semi-presidential republic that continues to illustrate the effects of colonization with the presence of Creole as the second most spoken language in Lisbon. The language was brought to Lisbon by Africans migrating to the city following unrest on the continent of Africa.
https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=ad33e54267084b3d8bfc862224d23fa6


guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2021, 01:45:20 am »
Africa's French Problem
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We break down France's legacy of colonialism, political, economic, and military hegemony over Africa.

Correction: Ghana is a former British colony, not French.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5Lk3pv20SY

guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2021, 06:04:16 pm »
How Portugal silenced ‘centuries of violence and trauma’
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There has been little acknowledgment of Portugal’s role in the transatlantic slave trade – until now.
A map published for Portugal’s 1934 Colonial Exhibition, held in Porto. It is entitled: “Portugal is not a small country” and shows the size of Portugal’s empire at the time as if super-imposed over a map of Europe [Courtesy of Paulo Moreira]
https://www.aljazeera.com/features/2021/3/10/how-portugal-silenced-centuries-of-violence-and-trauma

guest5

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Re: Is Counterculture Still Alive?
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2021, 05:00:35 pm »
Senegal's Cheerful Reawakening From Colonialism |African Renaissance | TRACKS
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In Senegal, Afua Hirsch discovers how exuberant hip-hop, film and fashion scenes have fed off colonial history, and she traces the story of a poet who became the father of Senegalese independence.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LtUN186uzc

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Renaissance is a French word meaning “rebirth.” It refers to a period in European civilization that was marked by a revival of Classical learning and wisdom.
https://www.britannica.com/event/Renaissance

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Etymology
Afri was a Latin name used to refer to the inhabitants of then-known northern Africa to the west of the Nile river, and in its widest sense referred to all lands south of the Mediterranean (Ancient Libya).[24][25] This name seems to have originally referred to a native Libyan tribe, an ancestor of modern Berbers; see Terence for discussion. The name had usually been connected with the Phoenician word ʿafar meaning "dust",[26] but a 1981 hypothesis[27] has asserted that it stems from the Berber word ifri (plural ifran) meaning "cave", in reference to cave dwellers.[28] The same word[28] may be found in the name of the Banu Ifran from Algeria and Tripolitania, a Berber tribe originally from Yafran (also known as Ifrane) in northwestern Libya,[29] as well as the city of Ifrane in Morocco.

The real Africa:
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Under Roman rule, Carthage became the capital of the province it then named Africa Proconsularis, following its defeat of the Carthaginians in the Third Punic War in 146 BC, which also included the coastal part of modern Libya.[30] The Latin suffix -ica can sometimes be used to denote a land (e.g., in Celtica from Celtae, as used by Julius Caesar). The later Muslim region of Ifriqiya, following its conquest of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire's Exarchatus Africae, also preserved a form of the name.

According to the Romans, Africa lies to the west of Egypt, while "Asia" was used to refer to Anatolia and lands to the east. A definite line was drawn between the two continents by the geographer Ptolemy (85–165 AD), indicating Alexandria along the Prime Meridian and making the isthmus of Suez and the Red Sea the boundary between Asia and Africa. As Europeans came to understand the real extent of the continent, the idea of "Africa" expanded with their knowledge.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africa


One cannot "reawaken" from colonialism yet still use colonial terminology to describe oneself.

guest5

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2021, 08:40:26 pm »
Why South Africa is still so segregated
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How centuries of division built one of the most unequal countries on earth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVH7JewfgJg

90sRetroFan

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2021, 10:40:12 pm »


NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2021, 02:32:20 am »


The resistance has not yet succeeded. The resistance can only be considered successful when all colonialist bloodlines have been eliminated from existence.

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Re: Colonization of Africa
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2022, 12:30:12 am »


NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.

antihellenistic

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The True Result of Western Civilization
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2022, 09:54:31 pm »
See this written explanation from a documentary video about Western Civilization :

Important Historical Knowledge :

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"Between the 15th Century, when Portugal became the first European nation to take significant part in African slave trading. And 1807 when the Transatlantic slave trade was abolished, European ships cutted millions of people away from Africa. In total European ships took over 11.000.000 people into slavery from the "West African Coast" alone.

This obvious trade made European grow rich on the profits while the populations of Africa was devastated

By the 1870s only 10 percent of the continent was under direct European control within Algeria, held by France. "The Cape Colony" and "The Natal" both in modern day South Africa held by the British. And Angola by Portugal. However, by 1900 Europeans were ruling more than 90 percent of the African continent. European nations had added almost 10 million square miles of Africa, one-fift of the landmass of the globe to their overseas colonial possessions. 

(Minute 00 : 18 until 01 : 55)

...

They developed a system of colluding with indigenous rulers. The supposed representatives of the people. So they got these people to help ferment wars and unrest so that slaves could be captured, and sold to them and then transported through the "Transatlantic" slave trade 

...

The avowed purpose of "The Berlin Conference" was to discuss the future of Africa. And the stamping out of slavery because most of European countries had become industrialized and so they no longer needed as much manual labor as they needed when they dependent on slave trade. So an Act was signed at the conference in Berlin, it's known as the Berlin Act of 1885 by 13 European powers, which had a result and the Act had a resolution to stop to help in the suppressing of slavery. So while on the surface they stamping out of a slavery sounds like a laudable venture. In reality, the major strategic and economic objective of the European countries was how to protect their old interest, trades and markets in Africa and how to exploit new ones. As I said this was in the light of the Industrial Revolution. We did not require as much as human labor as slave trade had provided. So the Berlin Conference therefore started the process of carving up Africa and putting up borders to suit European interest without taking into consideration to the cultural or ethnic components of Africa

(Minute 09 : 13 until 11 : 25)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7fnJgu4dqU

Source : Africa's Debt Crises - How the Developed World is Fleecing Africa's Wealth of Billions of Dollars, by Bunmi Oyinsan PhD - Sankofa Pan-African Series. 29th September 2022

Western Civilization is Bad
« Last Edit: September 29, 2022, 09:57:10 pm by antihellenistic »