Author Topic: Residential schools  (Read 619 times)

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2022, 05:59:27 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/exhibits-wisconsin-city-native-american-140436307.html

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An exhibit at Manitowoc Public Library, “Away From Home,” tells the story of another dark time affecting Indigenous communities, the infamous boarding schools.
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One display at the library shows a barber’s chair with a piece of long, braided hair cut off on the chair and a story from a survivor about how disgraceful it was for an Indigenous person to have their hair cut off.

Another display shows handcuffs specially made for children.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2022, 12:21:57 am »
https://us.yahoo.com/news/road-healing-event-draws-more-123700351.html

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Until now, former students of the institutions were largely ignored, surviving separation from family, culture and language, and navigating through generations of trauma left by the legacy of the boarding schools.

Kim Fyke, an elder of Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, donned a shirt that read "survivor of the holy schools."

Fyke, 61, is a survivor of Holy Childhood, one of the longest-operated Indian boarding schools in Michigan. The institution once housed thousands of Native American students from throughout the Great Lakes region.

She described physical and sexual abuse at the hands of school employees. School leaders knew of the abuse but did nothing to stop it, she said.

"I was once locked in a cooler at the institution, beaten, and deprived of all love ... I want answers why, why did they do this to little children?"

Because they are Westerners.

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"We are still suffering from the generational legacies left from these schools ... I've lost so many people to these institutions."
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The United States operated 408 Indian boarding schools between 1819 and 1969, according to the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative Investigative Report.

More than 150 were run by churches, about half each by Catholic and Protestant groups, according to the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.

In addition to the Federal Indian Boarding Schools, the Department of Interior also identified more than 1,000 additional federal and non-federal institutions that didn't fall under its definition, like Indian day schools, sanitariums, asylums, orphanages, and stand-alone dormitories that worked similarly in assimilating Native children.

By 1926, nearly 83 percent of Native American school-age children attended boarding schools. Many were sexually abused, beaten for speaking their language, and stripped of their culture and traditions.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2022, 07:14:42 pm »
https://us.yahoo.com/news/many-native-american-children-died-130057643.html

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For thousands of Indigenous children in Arizona and beyond, school didn’t mean learning and growth – it meant pain and suffering.

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, churches worked with the U.S. government to create hundreds of boarding schools for Native American children. During this time, Native children were coerced or forcibly removed from their families and communities. They were taken to institutions that were focused on dismantling their culture and family unit in the name of “assimilation” into white American culture.
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while the harms of the boarding school era are well-known to Indigenous communities, there had never been federal documentation of these horrors.

The report aimed to examine the scope of the Indian boarding school system with a specific focus on the locations, burial sites and possible identification of children. It was also notable because for the first time, the federal government acknowledged “that the United States directly targeted American Natives, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiian children in pursuit of a policy of cultural assimilation.”
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According to the Interior report, Arizona held the second largest number of boarding schools in the nation, with 47 schools throughout our state. You can see evidence of this horrible legacy today – Indian School Road was named as such because it led to a Native boarding school right in central Phoenix

Bonus Counterculture-era movie:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg1cEKgIHoI

90sRetroFan

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Re: Residential schools
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2022, 07:55:41 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/america-is-always-written-as-the-hero-native-american-boarding-schools-are-a-dark-period-in-us-history-that-not-enough-people-know-about-163018941.html

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Families were forced to send their children to these schools by the government and the Catholic church. By 1926, nearly 83% of all Native children were enrolled in one of these schools. Children were made to eliminate their entire cultural identities; schools cut their braids, had them wear uniforms, removed traditional foods from their diets and even assigned them new “white” names.

It was not until 1978, when the Indian Child Welfare Act passed, that Native American parents could even have a legal say as to whether their children could attend an off-reservation school.

Nikki Apostolou, a member of the Kanien’keha community whose great-grandfather attended one of the schools, explained to In The Know: “Many [of these schools] were promoted and operated under the belief that they were helping Native children to become better integrated into Christian, modern society.”
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Phyllis “Jack” Webstad, who is Northern Secwpemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation, was initially enrolled at a residential school when she was 6 years old in 1973. She shared that her grandmother had bought her a “shiny orange shirt” to get her excited for the first day of school. But when Webstad arrived, boarding school officials immediately stripped her of her clothes.

https://www.orangeshirtday.org/phyllis-story.html

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When I got to the Mission, they stripped me, and took away my clothes, including the orange shirt! I never wore it again. I didn’t understand why they wouldn’t give it back to me, it was mine! The color orange has always reminded me of that and how my feelings didn’t matter, how no one cared and how I felt like I was worth nothing. All of us little children were crying and no one cared.

NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.