Author Topic: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism  (Read 424 times)

90sRetroFan

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Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« on: January 16, 2021, 11:06:39 pm »

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Zea_mays

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Re: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2021, 10:29:03 am »
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The unbreakable bond of Ireland and Palestine
[...]
Ireland in particular has been a vocal supporter of the Palestinian cause. The origins of this solidarity come down to both the similarities and differences between the Irish and Palestinian national struggles.

‘Colonised people’

“The Irish people, as a colonised people living for centuries under British occupation, have instinctively identified with freedom struggles across the globe,” Gerry Adams, Irish republican and president of Sinn Féin, the largest Irish nationalist party in both the Republic of Ireland and the six counties of Northern Ireland that still belong to the United Kingdom (UK), told Middle East Eye.
[...]
In the late 1960s, the conflict known as “The Troubles” began, with militants seeking the reunification of Ireland attacking military and civilian targets, and the British army and Protestant militants responding in kind. Adams himself recounted his own memories of political activism and protest for the reunification of Ireland, and against apartheid South Africa, in the 1960s.

Speaking critically of the current Israeli government, he said their “strategies and actions are aimed at imposing an apartheid system on Arab-Israeli citizens; extending the occupation through the building of settlements in the occupied territories, as well as the separation wall; and physically and politically dividing Palestinians on the West Bank and in Gaza and the refugee camps in other states."

The current state of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process also troubles him, he said. In December, Israel denied Adams entry to the besieged Gaza Strip, and upon his return to Ireland, he was “deeply worried”.

“I am particularly concerned at the approach of the international community,” he told MEE, “which fails to hold the Israeli government to account for its actions and its breaches of international law.”
[...]
“International solidarity is vital for more than one reason,” Najwan Berekdar, a Palestinian citizen of Israel and activist, told MEE.

"Not only that gives hope for the Palestinians to continue their struggle knowing they have support, but it also brings our struggles closer together, as we have been learning new tactics which were used by colonised people everywhere.”

The popular techniques used by the Irish and South Africans serve to envigorate Palestinian efforts to resist Israeli occupation
, have led to innovative and interesting protests, some of which, such as the “Love in the Time of Apartheid” campaign, Berekdar organised.

https://www.middleeasteye.net/features/unbreakable-bond-ireland-and-palestine

Zea_mays

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Re: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2021, 09:49:37 pm »
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Just 16 years after their own “Trail of Tears,” the Choctaw Indians raised money for Irish Famine relief.
[...]
In 1847, only 16 years after the beginning of Choctaw Removal in 1831 (a process which lasted through 1849), the Choctaw learned of the plight of the Irish people 4,000 miles away. The Arkansas Intelligencer and Niles Weekly Register (which syndicated the article from the Intelligencer) recorded a meeting in Skullyville (capital of the Choctaw Nation in the Oklahoma Territory) where a collection was taken to assist the victims of the Potato Famine in Ireland.
[...]
The only other 19th century reference chronicling the Choctaw act of generosity to the starving Irish is found in The Voyage of the Naparima, based on the diary of an Irish schoolteacher from County Sligo. Gerald Keegan, with his fiancee, fled the Famine in 1847. They took passage on the Naparima, one of the many dilapidated hulls transporting Irish to Canada and the United States on the Irish “Trail of Tears.” Keegan’s March 13, 1847 entry recounts how people in “the outside world” had responded to the tragedy of mass starvation in Ireland.
[...]
Keegan’s final notation was: “Among the donations from various parts of the world there is one that is singularly appreciated. It comes from a small tribe of native North American Indians, the Choctaw tribe from central western United States. These noble-minded people, sometimes called savages by those who wantonly released death and destruction among them, raised money from their meager resources to help the starving in this country. This is indeed the most touching of all the acts of generosity that our condition has inspired among the nations.”

The modern links between the Choctaw and Irish, spawned by Mr. Mullan’s initial contact, continued to grow. In 1992, the Lord Mayor of Dublin unveiled a specially commissioned plaque (sponsored by AFrI) in Dublin’s Mansion House commemorating the generosity of the Choctaw and Canadian Indians to the Irish in 1847. During that same visit, Irish President Mary Robinson welcomed the Choctaw delegation and Chief Roberts’ representative conferred the title “Honorary Chief of the Choctaw Nation” upon President Robinson (the only woman so recognized in the history of the Choctaw). In May of this year the President visited the Choctaw headquarters in Oklahoma, and in a speech that once again linked the Irish and the Choctaw, she said, “The pain and suffering and loss caused by the dreadful famine in Ireland nearly a century and a half ago, have created an indelible record in the folk memory of our nation. We will always remember with gratitude, however, the compassion and concern displayed by the Choctaw Nation who, from their distant lands, sent assistance to the Irish people at that sad time. It has been my great privilege to be made an honorary chief of the Choctaw Nation and I am conscious that the honor bestowed on me will help to keep alive, in your country and in mine, the memory of their noble deed. … As the Choctaw people were so moved by the Irish plight so long ago, let us today be aroused to extend a helping hand to our brothers and sisters who are in need.”
https://irishamerica.com/2018/03/the-choctaw-tribe-and-the-irish-famine/

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For instance, the lore of the Choctaw donation is that the tribe donated $170 to Ireland not long after the Trail of Tears, when they were forcibly relocated to Oklahoma. But it turns out the Choctaw of Skullyville, Oklahoma, donated $170, while the Choctaw of Doaksville sent $150, and the Cherokee Nation raised $200 for the Irish.

“It wasn’t a one-time donation,” he says. “Here were multiple Indigenous communities imagining they’re in the same colonial sphere as the Irish, both oppressed by imperialism. It was super fascinating to find this out.”
[...]
A stainless steel, outdoor sculpture was dedicated in County Cork in 2017 as a memorial to the Choctaw donation during the famine.

But the connection didn’t stop there. During Ireland’s War of Independence, the nation’s president Eamon de Valera traveled to the U.S. in 1919 to drum up support for the cause. He ended up going all the way to Wisconsin to meet with the Lac Court Oreille band of the Ojibwe.

“He was made an honorary chief in front of 3,000 members of the Ojibwe” Donnan says.


Tribal Chief Joe Kingfisher told De Valera he wished could give him “‘the prettiest blossom of the fairest flower on earth, for you come to us as a representative of one oppressed nation to another,’” Donnan says.

During his speech, De Valera spoke in Gaelic and English to highlight both the cultural oppression of both groups, explaining how like the Ojibwe, the Irish have suffered under English oppression.

“They gave him a headdress, and he gave them bunch of .38 caliber guns, and the Ojibwe still has them today,” Donnan says
https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/kindred-spirits-irish-native-american-solidarity

Western-centric accounts of history continue to call it the "potato famine", but in reality it was acknowledged by both British and Irish at the time as being an intentionally engineered ethnic cleansing, just like what happened to the Choctaw. The British (and people in the US who wanted to bring the US culturally closer to the UK), did not view the Irish as "whites", but as racially-inferior "non-whites".

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The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lord Clarendon, wrote a letter to Russell on 26 April 1849, urging that the government propose additional relief measures: "I don't think there is another legislature in Europe that would disregard such suffering as now exists in the west of Ireland, or coldly persist in a policy of extermination."[191] Also in 1849, the Chief Poor Law Commissioner, Edward Twisleton, resigned in protest over the Rate-in-Aid Act, which provided additional funds for the Poor Law through a 6d in the pound levy on all rateable properties in Ireland.[192] Twisleton testified that "comparatively trifling sums were required for Britain to spare itself the deep disgrace of permitting its miserable fellow subjects to die of starvation". According to Peter Gray in his book The Irish Famine, the government spent £7 million for relief in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, "representing less than half of one percent of the British gross national product over five years. Contemporaries noted the sharp contrast with the £20 million compensation given to West Indian slave-owners in the 1830s."[160]

Other critics maintained that, even after the government recognised the scope of the crisis, it failed to take sufficient steps to address it. John Mitchel, one of the leaders of the Young Ireland Movement, wrote in 1860:

    I have called it an artificial famine: that is to say, it was a famine which desolated a rich and fertile island that produced every year abundance and superabundance to sustain all her people and many more. The English, indeed, call the famine a "dispensation of Providence"; and ascribe it entirely to the blight on potatoes. But potatoes failed in like manner all over Europe; yet there was no famine save in Ireland. The British account of the matter, then, is first, a fraud; second, a blasphemy. The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the famine.
[193]

Still other critics saw reflected in the government's response its attitude to the so-called "Irish Question". Nassau Senior, an economics professor at Oxford University, wrote that the Famine "would not kill more than one million people, and that would scarcely be enough to do any good".[193] In 1848, Denis Shine Lawlor suggested that Russell was a student of the Elizabethan poet Edmund Spenser, who had calculated "how far English colonisation and English policy might be most effectively carried out by Irish starvation".[194] Charles Trevelyan, the civil servant with most direct responsibility for the government's handling of the famine, described it in 1848 as "a direct stroke of an all-wise and all-merciful Providence", which laid bare "the deep and inveterate root of social evil"; he affirmed that the Famine was "the sharp but effectual remedy by which the cure is likely to be effected. God grant that the generation to which this opportunity has been offered may rightly perform its part..."[195]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_(Ireland)#Contemporary


The Trump administration used the Covid pandemic to ethnically cleanse "non-whites", including Native Americans who were sent bodybags instead of the medical equipment they requested.
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/native-american-health-center-asked-covid-19-supplies-they-got-n1200246

The Irish responded by raising donations for Native American communities which were especially hard-hit by the pandemic:
Quote
A fundraiser for two Native American tribes hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic has received tens of thousands of dollars from donors in Ireland, which many say is payback for tribal support during the Great Famine.

Hundreds of comments on the GoFundMe page raising money to help the Navajo and Hopi nations cite a donation by the Choctaw tribe to Ireland in 1847 as the inspiration for their donation, which has collected over $4 million so far.

“The Choctaw Nation sent the Irish monetary aid during the Irish Potato Famine. During this dark period in Irish history over 1 million Irish died while they were abandoned by their British rulers. But the Irish never forget, and we are repaying the generosity of the Choctaw Nation now in 2020, not forgetting that they, too, were suffering greatly under British rule during this period also,” reads one comment from late May.

“Thank you for the help that Native American people showed to Irish people at our time of struggle. It is fitting that their descendants can return that wonderful act of good will and kindness,” reads another.

The Irish/Native American connection might seem like an unlikely alliance to the casual observer, but not to history doctoral candidate Conor Donnan. He has spent his academic career looking at the Irish diaspora in the United States ,and in the process uncovered stories highlighting the transatlantic solidarity between Ireland and Native nations dating back to the 1800s.
[...]
As for the GoFundMe raising money for the Navajo and Hopi tribes, which have the highest rates of COVID-19 infection outside of New York and New Jersey, Donnan has spoken to people who have organized it and who have donated.

“There are so many cool things about it. There are over 73,000 donors and most of the donations are $10, $20, $30. It’s a grassroots movement,” he says.

The people of Ireland became very aware of the Choctaw donation after the sculpture installation in 2017 and when the Prime Minister Leo Varadkar visited the nation in 2018.

“It became a story of transatlantic solidarity that took the hearts of a lot of Irish people, and when they heard about the Navajo and Hopi plight, they thought, ‘This is our time to give back,’” he says.

He says he hopes something productive will come from the renewed attention. The Irish prime minister has said he wants the Choctaw to come to Ireland for university and will give free tuition. Donnan says maybe Irish politicians could create stronger transnational links with Native American businesses or work to help tribe members get room and board as well at Irish universities.
https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/kindred-spirits-irish-native-american-solidarity


Zea_mays

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In 1777, Morocco became the first state to recognize the independence of the USA.

US-Moroccan diplomatic relations were strengthened when US diplomats Thomas Jefferson and John Adams signed the Moroccan–American Treaty of Friendship with Sultan Muhammad III in 1786. The treaty is still considered to be in effect and is the longest unbroken treaty in US history.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moroccan%E2%80%93American_Treaty_of_Friendship

Prince Abdulrahman Ibrahim Ibn Sori from Guinea was enslaved and brought to the US in 1788. Sultan Abd ar-Rahman of Morocco petitioned the US for his release. US President John Quincy Adams Secretary of State Henry Clay negotiated with his "owner" to release him without payment, although the terms of his release stipulated that he would be deported from the US. White Supremacist Andrew Jackson ran against John Quincy Adams for the presidency, using Prince Sori's release as a talking point in his campaign.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdulrahman_Ibrahim_Ibn_Sori

While nations like the UK were favorable to the Confederacy in the US Civil War, Morocco was strongly aligned with the Union:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morocco%E2%80%93United_States_relations#American_Civil_War


By 1920, Ho Chi Minh became a leading figure in the Vietnamese independence movement. He joined an organization which petitioned the victorious powers of WWI for Vietnamese independence under their principle of "self-determination". The request was denied, since "self-determination" in the wake of WWI was merely a pretense to dismantle the defeated powers and "balance" the distribution of power in Europe by dividing populations along ethnic lines.
 
During WWII, the US and the pro-independence Viet Minh organization had close ties and supported each other in the war against Japan. Supposedly, President Roosevelt and General Eisenhower both supported an alliance with Ho Chi Minh for a post-WWII Vietnam, although things never worked out. In 1945, after WWII had ended, Ho Chi Minh declared Vietnam's independence and quoted from the US Declaration of Independence. (He also quoted from the 1791 French Rights of Man, highlighting the hypocrisy of the French colonialists.) Unfortunately, the US had become strongly Westernized by this time and did not ally with Vietnam, offering them no alternatives expect communism.
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5139/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States%E2%80%93Vietnam_relations#Before_1945

Apparently President Grant had promised an alliance with Vietnam in the 1870s when they were being invaded by France, although Congress refused. Vietnam had become completely colonized by the 1880s. Vietnam remembered the times the US at least tried to offer solidarity, but the US unfortunately forgot its past and became the victimizer instead.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States%E2%80%93Vietnam_relations#19th_century

Ironically, today Vietnam has good diplomatic relations with the US and relatively poor relations with China (who helped them win the US-Vietnam war), further demonstrating the stupidity of the US's role in the Vietnam war. For additional irony, Americans of Vietnamese descent (most of whom fled South Vietnam) are a strongly rightist and Trumpist demographic!

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Akon makes a speech during is Announcement  that he is building a New Akon City in Uganda. He says  Africa is Better than Europe,USA, Middle East but Only if It Unites
#AfricaSpeech​ #CandidAfrica​
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e83Yw_CobUI


Zea_mays

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The Iroquois nation has their own lacrosse team and used Haudenosaunee passports when travelling to sporting events. They refused to use US or Canadian passports, even when it meant being denied entry into the UK and forfeiting their games.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-iroquois-nationals-and-the-2010-world-lacrosse-championships-feature

The Irish lacrosse team gave up their spot in the 2022 World Games so the Iroquois team could play:
https://www.npr.org/2020/10/01/917033527/ireland-lacrosse-bows-out-of-2022-world-games-so-iroquois-nationals-can-play

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Lacrosse has its origins in a tribal game played by eastern Woodlands Native Americans and by some Plains Indians tribes in what is now the United States of America and Canada. The game was extensively modified by European colonizers to North America to create its current collegiate and professional form.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_lacrosse

Zea_mays

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Re: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2021, 07:36:07 pm »
Mural of Gaddafi in Belfast, Northern Ireland.



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Living here, I can tell you that the Loyalist murals are far more threatening; they're in black and white while the Republican ones are usually in colour. You'll also notice way more Loyalist murals in commemoration of certain people, more often than not people who committed Sectarian murder, rather than soldiers or police officers. Republican murals don't focus on this as much and usually have a much more international perspective (pro-ANC, Pro-Palestine, Pro-Cuba, Pro-Catalonia etc).

New Republican murals are especially tame (generic Pro-Ireland, anti-Racism stuff). Loyalist murals seem much more bleak and hopeless. Honestly, nowadays you see way more Pro-Palestine messages than Troubles related graffiti about in Republican areas.
https://old.reddit.com/r/ukpolitics/comments/61l0yy/images_of_peace_walls_and_murals_in_northern/dffft0m/

Zea_mays

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Re: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2021, 07:50:14 pm »
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90sRetroFan

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Re: Solidarity between fellow victims of colonialism
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2022, 11:09:41 pm »
What I like to see:

https://twitter.com/darshnasoni/status/1572173720801935360

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“We are from one family. We settled here in this city together, we fought the racists together, we built it up together. The recent violence is not who we are as a city.”
Joint statement on Hindu / Muslim tensions in Leicester

See also:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/jews-have-nothing-in-common-with-us!/msg5689/#msg5689
« Last Edit: September 30, 2022, 06:19:57 pm by 90sRetroFan »