Author Topic: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam  (Read 1851 times)

rp

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2021, 12:33:57 pm »
Keep in mind, Petito died before reproducing. Make of that what you will.

90sRetroFan

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2021, 11:25:34 pm »
https://deadspin.com/yes-the-nfls-taunting-penalty-is-racist-1847716682

Quote
“In general, I don’t really think there’s a place for taunting in the game,” Belichick said on WEEI Boston on Monday. “I think that’s poor sportsmanship and it leads to other things. It leads to retaliation, and then where do you draw the line? I think the whole idea of the rule is to kind of nip it in the bud and not let it get started.

“I’m in favor of that. I think that we should go out there and compete and try to play good football and win the game on the field. I don’t think it’s about taunting and poor sportsmanship. That’s not really my idea of what good football is.”

I’m confused.

Is this the same man who once told his team, “There’s nothing wrong. In fact, you should be excited when you make a play. Hell, look at all the work you put into it?”

Sure is. He even added: “And when you can show that picture visually to your opponent, that’s what intimidation is.”

It’s never lost on me that when white players get fired up or upset on the sidelines, it’s instantly viewed as passion and love for the sport. But, when Black players do it, it’s “too much,” “out of control,” or it “crosses the line.”

Black joy has always been viewed as criminal.

guest55

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #32 on: October 04, 2021, 05:20:11 pm »
Chris Hedges & Cornel West | The Vicious Legacy Of White Supremacy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH9BiF8FV_0

Zea_mays

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Re: Military decolonization
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2021, 08:31:06 pm »
In the 1950s-1960s, Iceland wanted US troops stationed in it, but not any "black" troops. After repeated pressure by US Presidents and Generals, Iceland eventually agreed to allow literally "three or four" "blacks". It was not until the late 1970s that this policy had ended and the percent of "black" US soldiers stationed Iceland were roughly equal to the overall percent of "blacks" in the military.

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The 1951 U.S.-Icelandic Defense Agreement paved the way for a permanent U.S. military presence at the Keflavik base in Iceland, an outpost that played a crucial role in U.S. strategy during the Cold War. The article explores two gender-related aspects of the U.S.-Icelandic Cold War relationship: the restrictions on off-base movements of U.S. soldiers, and the secret ban imposed by the Icelandic government on the stationing of black U.S. troops in Iceland. These practices were meant to “protect” Icelandic women and to preserve a homogeneous “national body.” Although U.S. officials repeatedly tried to have the restrictions lifted, the Icelandic government refused to modify them until the racial ban was publicly disclosed in late 1959. Even after the practice came to light, it took another several years before the ban was gradually eliminated. Misguided though the Icelandic restrictions may have been, they did, paradoxically, help to defuse domestic opposition to Iceland's pro-American foreign policy course and thus preserved the country's role in the Western alliance.
[...]
In no other European country hosting U.S. military facilities did the Americans face harsher restrictions. The United States also reluctantly went along with a secret demand by the Icelandic government to ban the stationing of black soldiers in Iceland—a policy that contravened President Harry S. Truman’s 1948 desegregation order in the U.S. military. After World War II, Greenland (under Danish jurisdiction), Canada, Newfoundland, Bermuda, and the British possessions in the Caribbean were also on a U.S. list of overseas basing areas in which black soldiers were deemed not to be welcome. But all these places except Iceland were removed from the list in the 1950s, although assignments of black troops were sporadically cancelled to countries such as Turkey because of domestic political considerations.
[...]
The article shows that gender was at the heart of Iceland’s exclusionary practices against U.S. soldiers—that the underlying reason for sealing off the Keflavik military base was a patriarchal need to protect Icelandic women from having sexual relations with foreigners. Women’s organizations generally supported this policy. What is more, the Icelandic government was able to dictate the terms of its relationship with the United States throughout the Cold War. The U.S. government had practically no say in the matter.
[...]
In March 1971 the Nixon administration formally handed the Icelandic government a memorandum detailing its complaints and asking for changes. The document noted that “nowhere in the world [were] U.S. troops subjected to such stringent restrictions as in Iceland, neither in democratic nor [in] authoritarian states.”
[...]
During World War II the U.S. military was still segregated, but some influential military officials who favored racial integration tried to resist foreign requests for whites-only deployments. U.S. Secretary of War Henry Stimson rejected such demands by the Australian government and several Central and South American governments. But in the case of Iceland, Stimson, perhaps betraying his ambivalence about race, was far less principled. He claimed that blacks would find it “a bit cold” to stay in Iceland and expressed no qualms about the Icelandic demand to exclude blacks from serving on the island. The U.S. government, it turned out, strictly enforced the ban throughout World War II. In one instance, a plan to send black soldiers to Iceland for a special technical mission was scuttled at the last minute. By mistake, several black troops were briefly sent to Iceland to work in kitchens of the U.S. Navy, but they were withdrawn as soon as the Department of War realized that their presence violated the Icelandic government’s racial policy. Icelandic women who had relationships with white soldiers were ostracized and branded as whores, but when it was revealed that some of the black soldiers had attempted to fraternize with Icelandic women, this was deemed an unpardonable offense.
[...]
After World War II, and particularly after Truman’s desegregation order in 1948, the U.S. military encountered far greater difficulty in acceding to foreign demands for the exclusion of black troops. But when the United States and Iceland negotiated the 1951 Defense Agreement, Icelandic officials used the same arguments they had cited a decade earlier. Icelandic Foreign Minister Bjarni Benediktsson wanted to make sure that “none of our black friends” would be part of the U.S. troops stationed in Iceland, at least not among the first contingent. ... The Keflavik base, which from 1952 to 1961 was under U.S. Air Force command, was the only foreign site at which this discriminatory policy was enforced. Although this policy was officially secret, white troops who came to Iceland in the 1950s were informed of it.
[...]
U.S. Navy in 1961, increased pressure was brought to bear on the Icelandic government. The Kennedy administration even contemplated making a public announcement that the Icelandic government was fully responsible for the policy. Only under this pressure did the Icelandic government agree to a new informal policy, which was conveyed to the U.S. government as follows:

The Icelandic government will not oppose the inclusion of three or four colored soldiers in the Defense Force, [...]
[...]
the government said it was prepared to make the same concession it offered two years earlier: “to allow three or four carefully selected married blacks”
[...]
The Craighill report proved to be the first step toward ending the ban. At the outset, only a few black soldiers were chosen to serve in Iceland—consistent with the Icelandic government’s wishes. Their number increased slowly, and in the 1970s and 1980s all restrictions apparently were removed, probably unofficially.
[...]
The Icelandic policy of preventing sexual relationships between Icelandic women and black soldiers did not change from World War II until the mid-1960s. Yet, interestingly enough, the ban did not apply to other “colored” people. Filipinos, for example, could stay in Iceland without restrictions.
https://direct.mit.edu/jcws/article/6/4/65/12687/Immunizing-against-the-American-Other-Racism

90sRetroFan

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #34 on: November 21, 2021, 08:44:06 pm »
It's OK for healthcare to be "white":

https://www.yahoo.com/news/enslaved-peoples-health-ignored-countrys-121853269.html

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Foremost among the unrelenting cruelties heaped upon enslaved people was the lack of health care for them. Infants and children fared especially poorly. After childbirth, mothers were forced to return to the fields as soon as possible, often having to leave their infants without care or food. The infant mortality rate was estimated at one time to be as high as 50%. Adult people who were enslaved who showed signs of exhaustion or depression were often beaten.
...
White masters, often brutal and violent, dehumanized the enslaved people who worked for them and became wealthy from their work. Slaveholders justified their treatment by relying on the widely accepted view of Black inferiority and the physical differences between Blacks and whites. Racist medical theory, the racist notion that the blacks were inherently inferior and animal-like who needed maltreatment to be sound for work, was a critical element.

Enslaved people were poorly fed, overworked and overcrowded, which promoted germ transmission. So did their housing – bare, cold and windowless, or close to it. Because they were not paid, slaves could not maintain personal hygiene. Clothes went unwashed, baths were infrequent, dental care was limited, and beds remained unclean. Body lice, ringworm and bedbugs were common.

This treatment began in slave dungeons, built by Europeans on the coastal shores of Africa, where enslaved Blacks awaited shipment to the New World. In Ghana, for example, perhaps 200 were cloistered in tiny spaces where they ate, slept, urinated and defecated. Archaeological research has shown the dirt floors were soaked in vomit, urine, feces and menstrual blood. Conditions within the dungeon were so deadly that cleaning them was discouraged; those who tried risked smallpox and intestinal infections.
...
And if a doctor was involved, Black patients were not necessarily told anything about their condition. The medical report went directly to the slave owner.
...
Some of the Black women were used in medical experiments; much of the research, some conducted without anesthesia, focused on maternal health. As the white scientists inflicted tremendous pain on the pregnant women, the infants being carried sometimes died. Through the torture of these enslaved women, many white physicians and white medical institutions gained considerable fame and wealth.

Adverse health consequences for Blacks facilitated the establishment of some medical advances, such as the invention of the speculum for gynecological exams. One enslaved woman reportedly endured 30 gynecological surgeries without anesthesia. Medical interests and also economic and political interests were served.

90sRetroFan

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2021, 08:50:58 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/im-black-look-white-horrible-140002729.html

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I'm Black But Look White. Here Are The Horrible Things White People Feel Safe Telling Me.

I was outside my house gardening a few weekends ago when a neighbor, whom I had known for almost 30 years, stopped by so I could pet his large, fluffy dogs. I took my gloves off, squatted down to give the dogs a really good scratching around their ears and felt the sun on my back. What could be better? And then my neighbor said: “Why do you have a ‘Black Lives Matter’ sign on your front lawn when all those people do is kill each other?”

My lovely day screeched to a halt.

“You know I’m Black, right?” I said, standing up as tall as my 5’4” frame would allow, the sun shining on my blond hair. I continued to pet his dogs, because I needed the comfort of petting dogs at that moment, and because I needed to keep my hands busy so they didn’t slap that man’s face.

After the usual back and forth of him saying “No!” and me saying “Yes!” and then him trying to gauge exactly “how Black I was” by asking which of my parents was Black and me replying “Both,” we had a very uncomfortable conversation about racism.

I told him about my father’s struggles to get an education because guidance counselors and admissions agents would not accept Black people into community colleges or SUNY programs in the 1950s and ’60s. I told him that even though my father was a veteran, he could not be approved to use the GI Bill for college or buy a house, since no one would process his paperwork because he was a Black man. I told him that people painted “Go Home ****” on the back of our home when my parents finally saved enough money to build a house in the suburbs of Syracuse, New York. And I told him how “Black Lives Matter” calls attention to the fact that Black people are considered less than white people ― and that needs to stop.

I also told him if people don’t understand that Black lives matter, Black people will continue to be murdered by the police and denied opportunities by the establishment. We will not be allowed to participate in the “American Dream,” and we will be made to feel that this is somehow our fault, when it is in fact the fault of a racist society with the full support of our government.

This isn’t the first time I’ve had to have this conversation. Encounters like this have been going on for a very long time for me.
...
There is also the story of a great-aunt, Annie Mother, who would pass as white to purchase properties and then sell or rent them to Black family members and other Black families who could not find decent, affordable housing. I wanted to be like Annie Mother, so I pursued a career in social justice, specifically issues related to housing.

My parents originally tried to purchase a home in Syracuse in the 1960s. Most of the houses they made offers on had deed restrictions that stated the home could not be “sold to Negros.” Determined to own their own home, they decided to build a house, and found some land in a subdivision in Liverpool, New York, where the builder was happy to sell to them. Despite this good news, they soon learned they couldn’t get approved for a mortgage. My dad had a good job at General Electric and my parents had savings, but none of this was enough, because they were Black.

My dad accepted a transfer to a position in Alaska, because he could earn double what he’d make in Syracuse. My mom and I moved in with my grandmother for a year and my mom banked all of my dad’s checks. When he returned, my parents paid cash to have their house built in Liverpool.

This was the same house on which people painted “Go Home ****.” They did this when we already were home ― there was no other “home” to go to. We lived in a white neighborhood, and I went to a school where all the other students were white. Before I started kindergarten, my parents had “the talk” with me. If you don’t know about “the talk,” let me explain it to you. “The talk” is about race. It’s about being Black in a world run by white people, where white people make the rules.
...
I didn’t look Black, but I am Black, so we figured I could and would be subjected to racist actions by my peers. We were prepared for groups of white parents to gather at the school to shout at me. Or spit on me. My parents needed me to understand that if this happened, it didn’t mean I was bad. It meant the adults were bad
...
In high school, one student came dressed as a klansman for Halloween, carrying a noose. Another student, wearing blackface and a loincloth, ran around in front of him. When the few Black students and a number of our white classmates complained to the principal about it, we were told we needed to “develop a sense of humor.”
...
White people think I am white too, and therefore feel safe saying all kinds of horrible things they might not say publicly. I’ve had people tell me it “disgusts” them to see interracial couples. They’ve told me they don’t understand why Black neighborhoods look so “ghetto,” and that Black people are “animals” or “thugs.” Many of these people are educated, and hold jobs or positions that give them some form of power or influence over Black people. They are doctors, judges, lawyers, social workers and politicians. That’s frightening.
...
Living as a Black woman who looks white has allowed me to experience white privilege firsthand. Because people assume I am white, it is assumed I am honest, smart and trustworthy. Many times I have thought to myself: If I looked Black, how would these people treat me? And I have known, without a shadow of a doubt, that I would be treated with disdain or suspicion, or as a criminal. I know in many instances that if I looked Black, the police would have been called to question me. And this sickens and angers me. How many of our Black brothers and sisters have had the police called on them simply for the act of living their lives?

guest55

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2022, 12:06:14 am »
Let's talk about history and an oppressor narrative....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9xl5uvqtQg

Beau answering a CRT question from one of his viewers.

guest55

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2022, 04:04:20 pm »
How Slavery Caused the American Civil War
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We are starting a new Kings and Generals animated historical documentary series on the history of the American Civil War. In this first episode, we will cover the reasons that caused the American Civil War, and will talk about the effects of slavery, tariffs, taxation, expansion, the election of Lincoln, Bloody Kansas and much more showing the reasons why a number of states seceded from the Union and declared the Confederate States of America leading to a long and bloody conflict. The series will also focus on all the major battles of the war, including Fort Sumter, Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Sherman's March, Appomattox Station, and more.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb9u4CKxOLE

See also: https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/abraham-lincoln/

90sRetroFan

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2022, 08:23:06 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/mcconnell-not-alone-lot-white-211016684.html

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McConnell’s not alone. A lot of white folks don’t think Blacks are real ‘Americans’ | Opinion
...
if you think McConnell is the only one who needs to be reminded that, as Black poet Langston Hughes once put it, “I, too, sing America,” you haven’t been paying attention. You missed Chuck Todd of NBC’s “Meet The Press” describing how “parents” are worried about critical race theory while “parents of color” might have a different view. You also missed CBS News’ tweet asking, “How young is too young to teach kids about race?” As if children of color don’t learn about race about the same time they learn about walking. Finally, you’ve missed all those news stories where reporters talk about “working-class voters,” “suburban moms” or “evangelicals” when they mean “white” — as if Black and brown people did not work, live outside the city or go to church.

Granted, this is not the bigotry of torches and hoods. No, this rhetorical decoupling of “African” and “American,” of Black people from normal human functions, represents “only” the bigotry of the implicit assumption, the things some people believe without consciously knowing they do — much less interrogating why they do. And yet, they do.

For them, white is the default position, the color of generic American-ness and, truth be told, generic human-ness. By contrast, Black and brown are the colors of exoticism, noteworthy only for how they diverge from, challenge or impinge the perceived norm.

That’s what McConnell’s mouth revealed about him. But it is necessary to recognize that he is not an outlier. Nor is inexact language the sin here. Rather, it is language that implicitly disavows, disinherits and disrespects tens of millions of people who are every bit as “American” as Mitch McConnell on his best day. Yes, it’s “only” the bigotry of the implicit assumption.

But that’s the most common kind.

guest55

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #39 on: January 28, 2022, 11:55:41 pm »
Martin Delany: The Father of Black Nationalism (Unique Coloring)
Quote
In this episode of Unique Coloring, Daniel J. Middleton draws and discusses the life of abolitionist, physician, and newspaper editor Martin Delany, the acknowledged father of black nationalism and the first black field officer appointed by the Union Army.

This Martin Delany biography features me drawing another grayscale coloring page for my black history adult coloring book.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79fVfTNkeAw

Quote
Martin Robison Delany (May 6, 1812 – January 24, 1885) was an abolitionist, journalist, physician, soldier, and writer, and arguably the first proponent of black nationalism.[1] Delany is credited with the Pan-African slogan of "Africa for Africans."[2]

Born as a free person of color in Charles Town, Virginia, now West Virginia (not Charleston, West Virginia), and raised in Chambersburg and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Delany trained as a physician's assistant. During the cholera epidemics of 1833 and 1854 in Pittsburgh, Delany treated patients, even though many doctors and residents fled the city out of fear of contamination. In this period, people did not know how the disease was transmitted.

Delany traveled in the South in 1839 to observe slavery firsthand. Beginning in 1847, he worked alongside Frederick Douglass in Rochester, New York to publish the North Star. In 1850, Delany was one of the first three black men admitted to Harvard Medical School, but all were dismissed after a few weeks because of widespread protests by white students.[3]

Delany dreamed of establishing a settlement in West Africa. He visited Liberia, a United States colony founded by the American Colonization Society, and lived in Canada for several years, but when the American Civil War began, he returned to the United States. When the United States Colored Troops were created in 1863, he recruited for them. Commissioned as a major in February 1865, Delany became the first African-American field grade officer in the United States Army.

After the Civil War, Delany went to the South, settling in South Carolina. There he worked for the Freedmen's Bureau and became politically active, including in the Colored Conventions Movement. Delany ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor as an Independent Republican. He was appointed as a trial judge, but he was removed following a scandal. Delany later switched his party affiliation. He worked for the campaign of Democrat Wade Hampton III, who won the 1876 election for governor in a season marked by violent suppression of black Republican voters by Red Shirts and fraud in balloting.
Quote
Medicine and nationalism

While living in Pittsburgh, Delany studied medicine under doctors. He founded his own practice in cupping and leeching. In 1849, he began to study more seriously to prepare to apply to medical school. In 1850 he was accepted into Harvard Medical School, after presenting letters of support from seventeen physicians, although other schools had rejected his applications. Delany was one of the first three black men to be admitted there. However, the month after his arrival, a group of white students wrote to the faculty, complaining that "the admission of blacks to the medical lectures highly detrimental to the interests, and welfare of the Institution of which we are members". They cited that they had "no objection to the education and elevation of blacks but do decidedly remonstrate against their presence in College with us."[18]

Within three weeks, Delany and his two fellow black students, Daniel Laing, Jr. and Isaac H. Snowden, were dismissed, despite many students and staff at the medical school supporting their being students.[19] Furious, Delany returned to Pittsburgh. He became convinced that the white ruling class would not allow Black people to become leaders in society, and his opinions became more extreme. His book, The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States, Politically Considered (1852), argued that blacks had no future in the United States.[20] He suggested they should leave and found a new nation elsewhere, perhaps in the West Indies or South America. More moderate abolitionists were alienated by his position. Some resented his criticizing men who failed to hire colored men in their own businesses. Delany also strongly criticized racial segregation among Freemasons, a fraternal organization.[citation needed]

Delany worked for a brief period as principal of a colored school before going into practice as a physician. During a severe cholera outbreak in 1854, most doctors abandoned the city, as did many residents who could leave, since no one knew how the disease was caused nor how to control an epidemic. With a small group of nurses, Delany remained and cared for many of the ill.

Delany is rarely acknowledged in the historiography of African-American education.[21] He is generally not included among African-American educators, perhaps because he neither featured prominently in the establishment of schools nor philosophized at length on Black education.[22]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Delany

See also: https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/secret-societies-and-occult-forces/

Zea_mays

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Re: The "Black" and "White" Identity Politics Scam
« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2022, 05:44:46 am »
Quote
Conservatives Are Pre-Mad at Biden's Supreme Court Pick Before the Pick Has Been Made
[...]
During the 2020 campaign, President Joe Biden pledged to nominate a Black woman to the big bench, and on Thursday afternoon he confirmed that he will follow through on that promise. It hasn't yet happened, to be clear, which hasn't stopped the pre-backlash to the future event from rolling in.
https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a38914282/biden-black-woman-supreme-court-nominee/


Meanwhile, the leftist take on this same topic.


90sRetroFan

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christianbethel

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When in doubt, use the 16 Words: 'We must Engineer the Destruction of Western Civilization and Tribalism, and Unite All Races Through Nobility.'

Aryan ≠ 'White'.

History is Written by the Victors.

He Who Controls the Past Controls the Future; He Who Controls the Present Controls the Past.

guest55

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Why I don't relate to my skin colour
« Reply #43 on: April 01, 2022, 04:21:41 pm »
Excellent! This is close to what we have been saying for decades now!

Why I don't relate to my skin colour
Quote
NB. This video is entirely my opinion and about my experiences. Please be considerate in the comment section down below. Thank you for your time, engagement, and support! I appreciate and adore you all.
--- chapters ---
2:00 Why I'm bitter | Defining 'tribalism'
6:57 What I (don't) see when looking into a mirror
16:14 Why we 'tribe'
17:20 How my boarding school became my surrogate 'tribe'
28:17 Thank you to my Patrons
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaCEUrVJfTc

"Black" and "white" are social constructs. No one is actually born white, or black! Pinkish and brown perhaps, but why is skin colour so important in the first place?

See also: https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/the-'black'-and-'white'-identity-politics-scam/

guest55

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Let's talk about Mallory McMorrow and identifying with the bad guy....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KgVF25J8cQ