Author Topic: Temperature effects  (Read 332 times)

90sRetroFan

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Temperature effects
« on: November 24, 2020, 02:49:18 am »
OLD CONTENT

We hereby commence the pushback against the popular HBD notion (tacitly grounded in Western standards) that colder habitats evolve superior people on average. It all depends on what standards we use to measure superiority.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22345077

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Sexual dimorphism in body composition across human populations: associations with climate and proxies for short- and long-term energy supply.
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CONCLUSIONS:

The inverse correlation between lean mass dimorphism and adiposity dimorphism indicates a sex-trade-off between these two tissue accretion strategies. At colder temperatures, females invest disproportionately more in adiposity, and males disproportionately more in lean mass. Dimorphism also increased in proportion to proxies for short-term but not long-term energy availability. These findings suggest that phenotypic plasticity contributes to variability in body composition dimorphism, and that the occupation of dimorphic niches regarding reproductive energetics may be important.

In other words, warmer habitats evolve lower sexual dimorphism on average. Therefore, by Aryan standards (low sexual dimorphism is superior), warmer habitats evolve superior people on average.

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bigthink.com/surprising-science/humans-evolved-live-in-cold

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Humans emerged from a tropical environment. For the most part, our bodies are not well adapted to the cold. You might be feeling that this winter as you battle the frost winds and dream of sunnier days. The fact that we can live in cold climates is a result of many behavioral adaptations. Though, in recent years we've also found that some populations have genetically evolved to be able to better adapt and live in the cold.
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Tapper goes on to say:

At the higher latitudes, you're confronting seasonality for the first time. . . They were experiencing winter. No other primate lives where there's no fruit in winter. There may be a dry season, but there's not a cold winter like these individuals in Dmanisi were experiencing.

It's believed that by shifting to a more meat-centric diet that they were able to live in such an environment.
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According to research from the Biological Sciences and Molecular Medicine at the University of California Irvine, scientists discovered that after early humans had migrated to colder climates, their chance of survival increased when their mtDNA was mutated and generated greater body heat production.

Professor Douglas C. Wallace states that:

In the warm tropical and subtropical environments of Africa it was most optimal for more of the dietary calories to be allocated to ATP to do work and less to heat, thus permitting individuals to run longer, faster and to function better in hot climates… In Eurasia and Siberia, however, such an allocation would have resulted in more people being killed by the cold of winter. The mtDNA mutations made it possible for individuals to survive the winter, reproduce and colonize the higher latitudes.

In other words, cold-adapted humans are thermodynamically more wasteful twice over, once via their diet and once in how they allocate energy after eating.

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www2.palomar.edu/anthro/adapt/adapt_2.htm

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A study of 100 human populations during the early 1950's showed a strong negative correlation between body mass and mean annual temperature of the region. In other words, when the air temperature is consistently high, people usually have low body mass. Similarly, when the temperature is low, they have high mass.
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A corollary of Bergmann's rule stated that a linear shaped mammal will lose heat to the environment faster than a more compact one of similar size. The boxes below illustrate this fact. Note that the long, narrow box has the same volume but greater surface area. It is comparable to a tall, slender animal.



In 1877, the American biologist Joel Allen went further than Bergmann in observing that the length of arms, legs, and other appendages also has an effect on the amount of heat lost to the surrounding environment. He noted that among warm-blooded animals, individuals in populations of the same species living in warm climates near the equator tend to have longer limbs than do populations living further away from the equator in colder environments. This is due to the fact that a body with relatively long appendages is less compact and subsequently has more surface area. The greater the surface area, the faster body heat will be lost to the environment.

While we (for good reason!) place a lot of emphasis on the selective pressures exerted by the subsistence farming lifestyle, it is also possible that (and this would explain why farming began in warm regions) is that some initial physiological neotenization occurred as a result of warm climate, which came with mentality changes that made these proto-Aryans think that farming would be a good idea, thus creating the selective pressure that then led to further and more comprehensive neotenization.

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I remember reading the Communication part of aryanism.net (out of curiosity of course), and I had a mind pop about how warmth usually equals welcoming, friendly, and empathetic while cold equals unfriendly, calculated, detached, frigid (hence the idiom "as cold as ice"). I thought it had some correlation with some of the core messages of this website and that a lot of those on the right who are interested into evolutionary biology always relate to whites being descended from the Arctic and relying on that as to why they claim they've created more complex civilizations (via destroying everything in their path with "cold calculation." This is a random tangent, but I'm just curious....

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Definitely! One of the most dangerous enemy strategies we are fighting against is the Arctic Alliance, which I guess deserves reposting in this thread:

vdare.com/articles/john-derbyshire-at-amren-the-arctic-alliance-revisited

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I divide the human race into Arctics and non-Arctics on paleoanthropological grounds. So Arctics are those present-day races whose remote ancestors inhabited the forests and tundra of northern Eurasia—the whites and the yellows, to a first approximation. In my book We Are Doomed I used the synonym “Ice People.”

In the world today, the Arctics exhibit two characteristics that separate them quite clearly from non-Arctics, or “Sun People.”.

**** YOU. We are Sun People.

See also:

www.stormfront.org/forum/blogs/u64037-e3293/

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In warm climates, people survive easily. They do not need to devote much effort to finding food, as fruit grows plentifully in the forests year-round. Contemporary hunter-gatherers living in tropical areas eat relatively little meat, and anthropologists believe Africans have always been highly herbivorous[1].
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In cold climates, on the other hand, food is difficult to come by, as fruit does not grow the whole year round. Consequently, people need to hunt to survive. In fact, primitive peoples in Arctic climates rely virtually exclusively on animal foods. Hunting requires creating tools and understanding of the behavior of animals, both of which are spurs to the evolution of intelligence.

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90sRetroFan

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Re: Temperature effects
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2021, 12:33:04 am »
Example:

https://sports.yahoo.com/nebraska-high-school-football-player-dies-following-heat-exposure-at-practice-221332158.html

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Geiger's father Scott Hoffman told the World-Herald that his son was 6-foot-3˝ and 389 pounds and didn't have any known medical conditions.

"He was a big kid, but he was a healthy big kid," he said.

He was a cold-adapted big kid.



Note sibling similarities:

« Last Edit: August 12, 2021, 12:49:03 am by 90sRetroFan »