Author Topic: Dietary decolonization  (Read 3551 times)

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #45 on: December 29, 2021, 10:28:36 pm »
"(Kobe beef, dark-haired pig, Wagyu beef etc.)"

"Wagyu" is a misnomer, as beef was avoided in ancient Japan, as covered in the first post of this topic:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/issues/dietary-decolonization/msg5060/#msg5060

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Historically, there was a beef taboo in Ancient Japan, as a means of protecting the livestock population and due to Buddhist influence.[84] Meat-eating had long been taboo in Japan, beginning with a decree in 675 that banned the consumption of cattle, horses, dogs, monkeys, and chickens, influenced by the Buddhist prohibition of killing.[85] In 1612, the shōgun declared a decree that specifically banned the killing of cattle.[85]

They should call it Meijigyu if they wanted to be historically accurate:

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This official prohibition was in place until 1872, when it was officially proclaimed that Emperor Meiji consumed beef and mutton, which transformed the country's dietary considerations as a means of modernizing the country, particularly with regard to consumption of beef.[85] With contact from Europeans, beef increasingly became popular, even though it had previously been considered barbaric.[84]

True Japanese eat natto:



https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20200727-japans-most-polarising-superfood

Anyone who prefers beef/pork to natto are degenerates who should be prohibited from reproducing.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2022, 10:24:22 pm by 90sRetroFan »

acc9

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #46 on: January 13, 2022, 01:24:29 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk5Y6ZT38o4&list=PLWX5WRs01r9EUVmdAb9mGjvL9eIpjJ0PV&index=2

What a lot of people value in today's eating/cooking culture is a significant reflection of how simple or complicated a style of life is preferred in everyday living. What comes to your mind when you hear "toffee apple"? The dessert as demonstrated in the above Masterchef Australia episode just shows to what extent simple cooking has been contorted .......Is our produce from nature for food or display?

Zea_mays

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #47 on: January 16, 2022, 08:41:58 pm »
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AT THE DINNER TABLE
(Summer of 1933)

His home was middle-class, one might almost say petit bourgeois. The rooms were smallish, the furnishing simple and without refinement. There was not a single piece that revealed anything of good personal taste or artistic value.

Whenever Hitler was in Berlin, he asked people to dine with him. It was considered a high honour to eat at Hitler’s table, and there were usually ten to twenty people, at most. The food was simple. In this, too, the party Führer liked to give an impression of modest living on proletarian lines. He frequently expressed his intention of changing none of his previous habits, either in his clothing or in his style of living. As a matter of fact, this did form an agreeable contrast to the extravagant behaviour of some of the new bosses. Hitler retained his old habit of sitting beside the chauffeur in his car; his clothes consisted of his familiar raincoat seldom surmounted by a hat, while under it he usually wore a civilian jacket with the party uniform trousers, or an ordinary lounge suit.

At dinner, there was soup, followed by a meat course, vegetables and a sweet. Hitler himself ate no meat, but he devoured astonishing portions of the sweet, and his personal cook, an old party member, prepared special vegetable dishes for him. But Hitler placed no vegetarian compulsion on his guests, nor did he refuse them alcohol in the shape of beer. There was a choice between beer and lemonade, and it was amusing to watch newcomers, especially enthusiastic party members, choosing lemonade, with a side-glance at the temperate Führer, in order to make a good impression.
Hermann Rauschning. (1939). Hitler Speaks. Page 66-67.
https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.505385/page/n65/mode/2up

Page 226:
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Did I know, he continued, that Wagner had attributed much of the decay of our civilisation to meat-eating? “I don’t touch meat,” said Hitler, “largely because of what Wagner says on the subject, and says, I think, absolutely rightly.” So much of the decay of our civilisation had its origin in the abdomen—chronic constipation, poisoning of the juices, and the results of drinking to excess. He did not touch meat or alcohol, or indulge in the dirty habit of smoking; but his reason had nothing to do with considerations of health, but was a matter of absolute conviction. But the world was not ripe for this advance.

Although Rauschning was a rightist who became anti-NS, historians consider his work to generally be credible, and his description of Hitler's vegetarianism is consistent with other sources noting Hitler as a vegetarian.
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Hermann Adolf Reinhold Rauschning (7 August 1887 – February 8, 1982) was a German conservative reactionary[2] who briefly joined the Nazi movement before breaking with it.[3] He was the President of the Free City of Danzig from 1933 to 1934, during which he led the Senate of the Free City of Danzig. In 1934, he renounced Nazi Party membership and in 1936 emigrated from Germany. He eventually settled in the United States and began openly denouncing Nazism.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Rauschning

In the section following the quote from page 226, Hitler then talks about Wagner's opera Parsifal.
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Wagner's last opera Parsifal, written in 1882, possibly contained some elements of his views on animal rights and vegetarianism, but there is much debate about the extent of any 'message' in it. In 'Wagner and Philosophy' Brian McGee says in his introduction that in the rest of the book "...I have discussed the belief about the oneness of all living things, with its consequent requirement of compassion for animals, on which his vegetarianism was based, and which found expression in Parsifal." McGee expands on this in his chapter on Parsifal (C.16 The Crowning Achievement,s.V):

    Even more with animals than with man, he says, does he feel kinship through suffering, for man by his philosophy can raise himself to a resignation that transcends his pain, whereas the mute unreasoning animal can only suffer without comprehending why. "And so if there is any purpose in all this suffering it can only be the awakening of pity in man, who thus takes up the animal's failed existence into himself, and, by perceiving the error of all existence, becomes the redeemer of the world. This interpretation will become clearer to you some day from the third act of Parzival, which takes place on God Friday morning." Manifestly, then, the Parzival drama had already defined itself within him as the drama of compassion'. [the quote is from the 'Venice Diary' of 1858 when Wagner was writing the early draft of Parsifal - and now being strongly influenced Schopenhauer]

After Wagner's letter to Ernst von Weber about vivisection in 1879, Cosima recorded his concern that this would be seen as the basis for Parsifal, but if McGee is right then the concern was clearly much deeper and much older.

In Act Three the Knights of the Grail avoid eating meat, though some argue only from necessity, and below is a scene from Act One of Parsifal which leads to some of the speculation:

    Just at this moment, cries are heard from the Knights: a flying swan has been shot, and a young man is brought forth, a bow in his hand and carrying a quiver of matching arrows. Gurnemanz speaks sternly to the lad and tells him that this is a holy domain. He then asks the lad if he did this deed and the lad boasts that if it flies, he can hit it ("Im Fluge treff' ich was fliegt!") The elderly Knight asks what harm the swan had done, getting the lad to notice the swan's blood-flecked remains, limp wings and lifeless eyes. Now remorseful, the young man breaks his bow and casts it aside. . . . [next scene] The boy . . . is roughly ejected . . . with a warning not to shoot swans. A voice from heaven repeats the promise, “The pure fool, enlightened by compassion." [the boy, or the 'pure fool' is Parsifal]
https://ivu.org/history/europe19b/wagner.html

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #48 on: January 16, 2022, 08:51:00 pm »
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the furnishing simple and without refinement. There was not a single piece that revealed anything of good personal taste or artistic value.

Simple and without refinement is good personal taste and artistic value!

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Rauschning was a rightist who became anti-NS

Hence he does not understand this.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #49 on: January 27, 2022, 01:26:56 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u_sLantkq4

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Global production of cheese is skyrocketing and for many, it's the first alternative when we quit meat. But dairy products and cheese especially can have similar impacts on the environment as meat. In some scenarios, they're even more harmful to the planet.

Whose fault is this again?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese#Modern_era

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Until its modern spread along with European culture, cheese was nearly unheard of in east Asian cultures and in the pre-Columbian Americas and had only limited use in sub-Mediterranean Africa, mainly being widespread and popular only in Europe, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and areas influenced by those cultures. But with the spread, first of European imperialism, and later of Euro-American culture and food, cheese has gradually become known and increasingly popular worldwide.

Zea_mays

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2022, 05:33:40 am »
As a follow-up of the other post, here is more evidence I stumbled upon showing Hitler was indeed vegetarian.

Hitler at a meeting with the Strassers and General Ludendorff in 1920.
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‘Bravo,’ said Ludendorff. Raising his clear green glass, which rested on a massive stem, he offered to drink with each of us. We all naturally responded to his gesture, but to my astonishment I noticed that Hitler’s glass contained nothing but water.

‘Herr Hitler is a teetotaler,’ Gregor explained, with a host’s smile. ‘He is also a vegetarian,’ he added, with a glance almost of apprehension at his wife.

The roast had just been brought in.

‘Herr Hitler will not offend me by refusing my cooking,’ my little sister-in-law said calmly, but at the same time challengingly.

An instinctive dislike of the guest who had been thrust on her was perceptible in her eyes and her whole attitude.

Else never approved of her husband’s intimacy with Adolf Hitler. She tolerated him during the years that followed without ever daring to express her revulsion aloud. But her hostility to Hitler never changed.

That day Adolf Hitler ate meat. I do not think he has ever done so since.
Otto Strasser. (1940). Hitler and I. Translated by Gwenda David and Eric Mosbacher (1940). Page 5-6.
https://archive.org/details/HitlerAndIOttoStrasser

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Roehm had taken a year’s lease of a room at Wiessee. Immediately on receiving Hitler’s reply, he went to the village inn and booked a number of rooms for June 29. He even ordered a vegetarian lunch for Adolf. I learned these details from responsible witnesses.
Otto Strasser. (1940). Hitler and I. Translated by Gwenda David and Eric Mosbacher (1940). Page 188.
https://archive.org/details/HitlerAndIOttoStrasser


So, we have Rauschning (an anti-Hitler rightist) and Otto Strasser (an anti-Hitler leftist) both finding Hitler's vegetarianism and disinterest in alcohol to be remarkable enough to mention it multiple times.


Wagener and Hitler's secretary (Christa Schroeder, who was hired in 1933) suggested his vegetarianism was influenced by the death of his niece Geli Raubal in 1931 for some reason. However, Strasser makes clear that Hitler's vegetarianism and teetotalism was already notable by 1920, and Rauschning writes Hitler had told him his principled conviction in vegetarianism was influenced by Richard Wagner and romanticist attitudes.
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When I met him a week later [1931] in Nuremberg, it came to my attention that he ate no meat. Unfortunately, I myself had ordered goulash. I noticed Hitler fighting off nausea as I put the meat on my plate, though I did not make the connection. Suddenly he rose and said:

“I’ll sit over there. Please Join me when you’ve finished.”
Otto Wagener. (written in 1946, first published in German in 1978). Hitler: Memoirs of a Confidant. Edited by Henry Ashby Turner, Jr., translated by Ruth Hein (1985). Page 222.
https://archive.org/details/wagenerhitlermemoirsofaconfidant/page/n265/mode/2up

From the editor's narrative in the introduction. (They didn't do a very good job researching if they didn't find Strasser's and Rauschning's accounts!)
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He provides an explanation for Hitler's becoming a vegetarian, a development about which little is otherwise known.[38]

[38] See chapter 35, where Wagener connects that step with the death of Hitler’s niece Geli Raubal. Hitler’s private secretary had also linked his becoming a vegetarian to Geli’s death, but without the details provided by Wagener: Albert Zoller, Hitler Privat: Erlebnisbericht seiner Geheimsekretärin (Düsseldorf, 1949), p. 91.
Otto Wagener. (written in 1946, first published in German in 1978). Hitler: Memoirs of a Confidant. Edited by Henry Ashby Turner, Jr., translated by Ruth Hein (1985). Page xxv.
https://archive.org/details/wagenerhitlermemoirsofaconfidant/page/n27/mode/2up

The timeline of Hitler's teetotalism given by Wagener is consistent with Strasser's account, and it is consistent with Rauschning's account that Hitler did not do this for health reasons, but principle.
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But Hitler denied himself even more. Early on, he had given up smoking and, soon after the war, any enjoyment of alcohol.

“People sometimes think,” he told me on the occasion of a trip we took together, “that I don’t like beer or wine. Oh! I really do like them. But every time I saw a bottle of wine, or even a quarter-bottle, or a mug of beer, I was reminded of my time in Vienna and later in Munich, when I had wanted it so much, I as well as my comrades—but we had not been able to afford it. All of us had had to think twice, three times, before we spent so much as a penny. And even then I had often enough put the money back into my pocket once more because somewhere I had seen a book that I wanted to borrow or buy because I felt an inner urge to have read it. And today, when there are so many people out of work who are living now as I lived in those days, I cannot bring myself to take a glass of wine or a mug of beer, since behind the glass I always see the sobbing expression of a head of a family or the satanic grimace of the plight afflicting the Volk.

“And so I gradually gave it up.”
Otto Wagener. (written in 1946, first published in German in 1978). Hitler: Memoirs of a Confidant. Edited by Henry Ashby Turner, Jr., translated by Ruth Hein (1985). Page 34.
https://archive.org/details/wagenerhitlermemoirsofaconfidant/page/n63/mode/2up

----

Ok, one more account. It was shockingly easy to find all this, given the number of random articles I've seen in the past desperately trying to claim Hitler being a vegetarian was just some myth.
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The food was emphatically simple. A soup, no appetizer, meat with vegetables and potatoes, a sweet. For beverage we had a choice between mineral water, ordinary Berlin bottled beer, or a cheap wine. Hitler was served his vegetarian food, drank Fachinger mineral water, and those of his guests who wished could imitate him. But few did. It was Hitler himself who insisted on this simplicity. He could count on its being talked about in Germany. Once, when the Helgoland fishermen presented him with a gigantic lobster, this delicacy was served at table, much to the satisfaction of the guests, but Hitler made disapproving remarks about the human error of consuming such ugly monstrosities. Moreover, he wanted to have such luxuries forbidden, he declared.
[...]
Hess came to table about once every two weeks; he would be followed by his adjutant in a rather weird getup, carrying a tin vessel containing a specially prepared meal which was to be rewarmed in the kitchen. For a long time it was hidden from Hitler that Hess had his own special vegetarian meal served to himself. When someone finally gave the secret away, Hitler turned irritably to Hess in the presence of the assembled company and blustered: “I have a first-class diet cook here. If your doctor has prescribed something special for you, she will be glad to prepare it. But you cannot bring your food with you.” Hess, even then inclining to obstinate contrariness, began explaining that the components of his meals had to be of special biodynamic origin. Whereupon Hitler bluntly informed him that in that case he should take his meals at home. Thereafter Hess scarcely ever came to the dinners.
Albert Speer. (1969). Inside the Third Reich. Translated by Richard Winston and Clara Winston. (1970). Page 119-120.
https://archive.org/details/inside-the-third-reich-memoirs-by-albert-speer-by-albert-speer-richard-winston-a/page/118/mode/2up

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Finally the conversation would revert to the quality of the food. He was highly pleased with his diet cook and praised her skill at vegetarian cuisine. If a dish seemed to him especially good, he asked me to have a taste of it.
[...]
Incidentally, even here at headquarters he would often make fun of meat-eaters, but he did not attempt to sway me. He even had no objection to a Steinhager after fatty food—although he commented pityingly that he did not need it, with his fare. If there were a meat broth I could depend on his speaking of “corpse tea”; in connection with crayfish he brought out his story of a deceased grandmother whose relations had thrown her body into the brook to lure the crustaceans; for eels, that they were best fattened and caught by using dead cats.
Albert Speer. (1969). Inside the Third Reich. Translated by Richard Winston and Clara Winston. (1970). Page 301.
https://archive.org/details/inside-the-third-reich-memoirs-by-albert-speer-by-albert-speer-richard-winston-a/page/300/mode/2up
« Last Edit: January 31, 2022, 09:34:56 pm by Zea_mays »

SirGalahad

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2022, 07:37:52 pm »
None of this information is even all that necessary because Hitler's teeth have been analyzed, and there were no traces of meat consumption. So whenever vegetarian and vegan leftists claim that members of Hitler's party only claimed him to be vegetarian for propagandistic purposes, they're making a statement that's so easily falsifiable if you skim through Hitler's Wikipedia entries. In their defense though, this analysis was only conducted a few years ago.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2022, 07:44:16 pm by SirGalahad »

guest55

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2022, 12:07:33 am »
Karl Wilhelm Krause also confirms Hitler's vegetarianism at 19:25 of this interview of him. Note that it was Dr. Morel that told Hitler to eat sardines. Many in the upper echelon of the NSDAP seemed to be suffering stomach issues at the time too, I suspect stress was a major contributor. (I'm not a big fan of Krause myself and it seems Hitler ended up having some issues with him as well....).

In The Service Of The Führer Hitler’s Shadow Documentary
https://vimeo.com/583598857

Zea_mays

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2022, 09:39:27 pm »
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None of this information is even all that necessary because Hitler's teeth have been analyzed, and there were no traces of meat consumption.

Interesting, I hadn't heard of that before. Still, even before that there were multiple literary sources available for decades confirming it, yet I have seen so many blogs and articles try to argue without even being aware of such basic information.  ::)

(I just edited my previous post with an additional source. I figured I'd compile this information here as I stumbled across it while doing research for the socialism thread.)

Zea_mays

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #54 on: January 31, 2022, 09:48:38 pm »
Ok, time for some actual ideological decolonization:

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Tell us about the Sistah Vegan Anthology and why you started this project.

In September 2005, I transitioned to veganism because it aligned with my perceptions of social and environmental justice. I had been living in the Boston area for six years, and couldn’t find any other black identified vegans. I was also doing research on the internet just to look at veganism and African Americans when I somehow came to the BlackPlanet.com website. There was a dialogue about a PETA campaign and the images used—people suffering in the Holocaust, Native American genocide and African American slaves positioned next to nonhuman animals that were suffering from exploitation. There were 28 people on that dialogue and 27 were really annoyed and offended by this campaign. There was only one black woman who said she understood what PETA was trying to convey. I found that interesting and wondered if this was a case of racism from PETA or speciesism from the 27 black people on the forum.

I decided to do a call for papers and see if there were other female vegans of the African Diaspora in America. I wanted to look at how our philosophies are shaped by the fact most of us, collectively as black women, have experienced racism and classism. How does that shape how we understand food, nutrition, veganism and how we understand those connections to environmentalism and the treatment of nonhuman animals?
[...]
Can you talk more about veganism as an approach to combating institutional racism, and the legacies of colonialism and slavery?

It is important to note a lot of the health disparities we face result from legacies of colonialism, slavery and current systemic whiteness.

A lot of the foods African Americans have been eating we were given as part of the slave system and colonialism. Most of the food and preparation was never actually healthy—high flesh foods, high saturated fat and sugar foods. A lot of it came from exploiting nonhuman animals and the reason we are eating it is because we ourselves historically have been exploited as slaves. We need to start reflecting deeper in our practices of anti-racism and decolonization. Like Dick Gregory notes, we even need to look at our own traditional black soul food diet as part of this decolonization process.

One thing I’ve been thinking about lately is the work of Antonia Dumas who works at the Food Studies Institute in New York. In 2001 she went to Florida to the Bay Point School for boys where she worked with low-income “at risk” adjudicated black and Latino teens. She asked the boys to incorporate a plant-based whole foods diet for six weeks and keep a food journal about how they feel. In the journals the boys recorded that their moods changed drastically. Their grades changed for the better and physically they felt better. It was amazing. I listened to an interview of her on the radio show Animal Voices, out of Toronto. The interviewer noticed Antonia was having problems getting funding for this project and asked ‘Do you think this has something to do with how profitable the prison industrial complex is?’ I thought that was an interesting link to what a more mindful and compassionate diet means for at risk youth. Whole foods plant-based veganism is potentially a great way to lower the risk of these teenage boys entering the prison industrial complex.


A few months ago, we were having a discussion about how the public dialogue around ethical eating is dominated by a select few, and how it often doesn’t incorporate the larger justice issue we are talking about here. It seems to be more about modifying the status quo than challenging consumption. Can you talk about that?

I’ve been thinking about that since I read Peter Singer’s interview in Satya. I understood his intent that maybe if we get people mindful and aware of where their meat comes from, then they’ll start buying organic and free-range. Maybe it’s more “humane,” maybe eventually this will spark something in the person’s brain to really reflect on where their food comes from. I think he was hoping people will keep on enlightening themselves to the point where they’ll realize they don’t need to eat meat.

But I think someone can actually fall into being apathetic and complacent. It just puts a band-aid on the larger problem. Back to African slavery, there were people trying to figure out how to make the state of slavery better, how to make the slaves’ lives better. But that doesn’t address the question, is it okay to enslave human beings?

Supposedly by 2048 we will no longer have a seafood stock from the ocean. And people are saying ‘oh no, well what fish can we start breeding so we can have more to eat?’ My question is why are we not reframing the question to, why do we still need to eat fish?

At least there is some mindfulness and compassion behind fair trade coffee, chocolate and tea, but I don’t want it to stop there. It is a phenomenal idea because up until recently many people were suffering to give first worlders their addictive substances. But then, I started thinking why are we using their land to give us our addictive substances—sugar, tea, coffee and chocolate—even if it is fairly traded? Why don’t we reframe the question, and ask why can’t we just let them use that land to grow their own crops to be self-sufficient?

It’s problematic because we are not trying to get to the very root of the problem, which is, at least in the first world, over consumption. We are not addressing our addictions.
https://www.loveunityvoice.com/sistah-vegans-the-satya-interview-with-dr-amie-breeze-harper/

Article with some thoughts on how to use intersectionality/anti-racism to improve vegan activism.
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White Veganism is a reference to mainstream veganism—which is, undeniably very white, narrow, one sided and ignores intersectionality.
[...]
The more constructive approach would be illustrating how our government heavily subsidizes this corrosive industry, then create programs (i.e. WIC)  that will disproportionately funnel disease-inducing food into Black and Brown bodies. How CAFO’s (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations) are strategically placed in or near PoC communities where irresponsibly managed waste poisons the air, water, and food supply of the community. How we shouldn’t attack slaughterhouse workers who are not evil incarnates, but poor and marginalized people forced to work a job most people would not do themselves. How realizing that our plant-based foods are anything but “cruelty free” when you consider the  farm workers who are horribly mistreated most places our food is grown. The intersection of capitalism and white supremacy utilizes the mass exploitation of animals as a medium to drive profit and power over people and the planet.  
[...]
The adherers of white veganism (because white veganism is a way in which veganism is advocated and could very well be adhered to by a PoC) will often talk about how they do not care about the oppression of humans and will willfully engage in that oppression. They will often times perpetuate racism and sexism in their quest to promote veganism or just in everyday actions as they do not care about dismantling other systems of oppression. This is due to the privilege white vegans inherit that allows them to not think about race or racism on a daily basis. White veganism erases the role that whiteness and its constructs create and promote in animal exploitation. They will often say we are “divisive” and “taking away from the animals” when we speak on the issues of white veganism but nothing could be farther from the truth. White veganism creates barriers against veganism, it paints veganism as being inherently racist.

Animal liberation cannot succeed through white veganism.
https://web.archive.org/web/20200616042747/https://veganvoicesofcolor.com/2017/01/09/dismantling-white-veganism/

"White" identity alert! (Comment from someone who disagrees with the article):
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Anti-white hatred has gotten to the point where almost all leftist thought is soaked in it. I say this as a Jew, as a traditionally liberal Jew, and it really disturbs me. This is why veganism needs to be kept away from partisan politics.
https://old.reddit.com/r/vegan/comments/5n8bah/dismantling_white_veganism_mainstream_veganisms/dc9w1ws/


This article is mostly academic word salad, but it also raises the point that "white" veganism must be replaced with anti-capitalist and anti-racist sentiments if veganism is to be worthy of being called a social justice movement. Western Civilization is behind both the dietary colonization of non-Western nations (which, prior to colonization, were largely vegetarian/vegan), and ongoing racist oppression. Veganism as a social justice movement can only succeed if it is anti-Western/anti-"white".
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Recently, I watched a youtube video from Unnatural Vegan entitled, “Anti-Capitalism is Anti-Vegan”. I am not even going to elaborate on the nonsense that this video is propagating — there are response videos make a great analysis against this content. The creator has 250K subscribers and the video 142K views. But this explains why veganism as a social (justice) movement is in crisis. There is truth here — Veganism is not inherently anti-capitalist, and this is truly problematic as an anti-oppressive social (justice) movement. Unnatural Vegan’s arguments align with a white supremacist imperialist veganism, which was never disrupted by Watson and The Vegan Society, and is currently propagated by John Mackey of Whole Foods Market. This is a morally astute form of capitalism, “Conscious Capitalism”. For too many people there is only one form of veganism — a single-issue movement that is anti-indigenous, anti-Black, colonial, capitalist and centered around white supremacy and white saviorism.
[...]
The animal agriculture industry has expanded in the Global South. Roeder’s “Beyond Diet’’ piece explains that for some BIPOC contemporary vegans around the world, “the return to a plant-based diet signifies resistance to a legacy of European colonialism that harms both human health and the natural environment.” But this walks around neocolonialism that enforces European-American customs and food traditions based on diets high in meat, dairy, and gluten (the Western Patterned Diet). Although Roeder positions veganism as “an obvious threat to the animal agriculture industry,” neocolonialism exists in more ruthless and hegemonic ways.

While mainstream veganism focuses on contentions with meat and dairy industries in the US and Europe, there is very little investment in disrupting the neocolonial take over by meat and dairy industries in the Global South. Neoliberal free-market policies in the last 40 years have exponentially expanded meat and dairy industries and pushed consumption throughout the world. In continental African, where prior to European colonization food was often vegetarian and still is in many regions, growing capitalist markets are attempting to change that.
[...]
White-led anti-oppressive movements will always be problematic. Veganism is institutionalized, those who wield power and moral authority within veganism are white.
[...]
Anti-blackness has never been positioned as unethical in western settler colonial nations, and neither has white savior trauma ****. The work of Reign Hervey contends that “race is seen as only worthy of discussion as a means of advancing nonhuman animal liberation. …Instead of addressing white supremacy as an ideology responsible for exploitation, white veganism maintains animal rights as a single issue or uses nonwhite bodies to fill a quota to avoid talking about race directly.” Hervey’s work connects with Aph and Sly Ko’s Aphro-ism: Essays on Pop Culture, Feminism, and Black Veganism from Two Sisters: “Comparing and contrasting the literal/physical violation these subjects experience misses the conceptual boat since the reason why they are each oppressed is precisely because they are all citizens of the same subhuman space. Naturally, their oppression might physically resemble one another since they have a common oppressor.
[...]
When white supremacy and capitalism is ejected from our collective understanding and activism against speciesism, veganism as an anti-oppressive social (justice) movement is stripped from truly being revolutionary.
[...]
Additionally, T. Colin Campbell coined the term “plant based” to depoliticize veganism and focus solely on diet culture further pushes colonialism and cultural appropriation. This connects currently with John Mackey, a self proclaimed conscious capitalist and vegan health advocate. So we can not be surprised when veganism projects and sustains elitism and white supremacy.
[...]
Veganism is not yet fully ethical and not yet fully liberatory, but Black Veganism shows the way.
https://lbetty1.medium.com/veganism-is-in-crisis-36f78fa9a4b9


90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #55 on: February 05, 2022, 11:03:52 pm »
Here is an example of how decolonization in one field can end up increasing colonization in another field. Just days ago we thought we had seen a sign of hope:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/issues/media-decolonization/msg10956/#msg10956

Now what we thought was an icon of decolonization is being used in China to sell WESTERN WINE FFS:

https://wx4.sinaimg.cn/mw2000/6b1a55e1ly1gyi1f91td8j20u01hcq6w.jpg (WTF?!)

https://wx4.sinaimg.cn/mw2000/6b1a55e1ly1gyi1f5uzxfj20u01hcqav.jpg (WTF?!?!)



So I looked it up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_in_China#Consumption

Quote
China's consumption of red wine has grown by 136% since 2008
...
Since around 2008, many small convenience stores have begun to carry a small selection of wines, with specialty wine shops emerging in cities throughout the country.



Still, this gives us the chance to discuss something else: alcohol decolonization. Since the colonial era, pre-colonial local alcoholic beverages in colonized countries have been to varying degrees supplanted by Western wine. This is also something we should be trying to reverse. While we are not especially pro-alcohol in general, if people must drink, from a purely anti-colonialist perspective we should encourage them to drink the pre-colonial stuff.

This also applies to the New World, where we should be promoting the various local varieties of:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_beer

while attacking anyone who drinks Western wine.

Further information:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicha

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiswin

etc.

It goes without saying that we should also ridicule the Homo Hubris wine glasses at every opportunity:









90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #56 on: February 05, 2022, 11:34:17 pm »
And the Homo Hubris wine bottles too!











As well as related items:









And one more thing:



How to be a Westerner:



What will happen if we do not prohibit our enemies from reproducing:

« Last Edit: February 06, 2022, 12:03:30 am by 90sRetroFan »
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90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #57 on: February 26, 2022, 09:18:41 pm »
This is a good small step, at least:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/russian-vodka-pulled-shelves-us-072106736.html

Quote
Liquor stores across the U.S. and Canada have started throwing out their stocks of Russian vodka in protest of President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, according to reports.


guest55

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #58 on: February 26, 2022, 09:54:49 pm »
Hey man, I was born in the Rheinland Phalz and apparently my biological father grew grapes!?!?  :D We started making wine because of the Romans though? Should I start calling you Charlemagne!?  ;)

Quote
Germany has a long history of winemaking. In the course of their conquests some 2,000 years ago, the Romans – who adopted viticulture from the Greeks and Etruscans – introduced viticulture to the Germanic territories. In the 8th century, Charlemagne regulated viticulture and viniculture as well as wine-related commerce. Monasteries were centers of wine culture, and wine was the drink of the people throughout the Middle Ages. The 19th century could be seen as a “golden age” of German wine, a time when wines from the Mosel and the Rhine were favorites among royalty and fetched higher prices than even Champagne and Bordeaux. Today, German vintners are introducing innovative ideas to modernize their centuries-old traditions: celebrating iconic varieties like Riesling and the Pinots while experimenting with new grapes, styles, and techniques.
https://germanwineusa.com/basics/history-of-german-wine/




90sRetroFan

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Re: Dietary decolonization
« Reply #59 on: February 27, 2022, 01:07:04 am »
"We started making wine because of the Romans though?"

I would theoretically support reviving drinking wine from Roman-style vessels:



https://www.123rf.com/photo_14990586_illustration-of-ancient-roman-dippers-or-drinking-cups-with-a-wine-jug.html

More examples:

https://www.catawiki.com/en/l/18587909-ancient-roman-terracotta-legionary-wine-cup-55x50mm

https://www.catawiki.com/en/l/17037765-ancient-roman-terracotta-legionary-wine-cup-47x68mm

https://www.catawiki.com/en/l/18701829-ancient-roman-terracotta-legionary-wine-cup-95x93mm

as opposed to the Western-style stemware (pictures in earlier posts) which originated from the Renaissance:

Quote
The first stemmed glass is said to have originated in Venice, the capital of glassmaking, around the 1400s. The style was based on the structure of the chalice that was used for religious purposes. At that time, wine was drunk in cups that were either made from wood, leather, pewter or clay, so the stemware didn’t receive much attention. Around 1450, the cristallo glass was invented and was used on the island of Murano in Venice. With this, it helped in enhancing the look of glassware especially with its colorless appearance.