Author Topic: Dress decolonization  (Read 4066 times)

Killthebank

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2021, 09:19:54 pm »
This isn't about decolonization but it's funny because a certain group got triggered.

https://www.newsrael.com/post/-MXTjqlultwWM1Znv_mp

Anybody going to wear that shirt while walking around Queens?
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guest5

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2021, 01:20:54 am »
Young people in China want traditional non-Western Han clothing back in fashion
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Across China, some young people are switching from jeans and T-shirts to long dresses, silky robes and black hats.

They’re not cosplayers or period drama actors, but rather members of a booming movement to turn Hanfu, or ethnic Han clothing, into everyday wear.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cip9DA1UvHk

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Dave102693
1 year ago
Traditional clothing needs come back to the whole world.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2021, 03:17:23 am »
"Young people in China want traditional non-Western Han clothing back in fashion"

It seems like they are more anti-Manchurian than anti-Western. Their main aim seems to be to emphasize that Han people shouldn't wear Qing clothes, rather than to reject Western aesthetics.

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Across China, some young people are switching from jeans and T-shirts to long dresses, silky robes and black hats.

Jeans and T-shirts are Counterculture clothes, not Western clothes. In particular, the T-shirt being collarless and cuffless:



is actually closer to Qing style:

https://img9.doubanio.com/view/photo/l/public/p2585786663.webp

than to Western style which is defined by collars and cuffs:



originating from this ****:



But if these people are actually motivated by dislike for Qing style, then it is no surprise they would reject T-shirts (which have similar geometry) also.

So while I would support the movement in principle, in practice I am not optimistic. Not least because I have already noticed Chinese Eurocentrist filmmakers trying to sneak in Western sartorial elements and passing them off as "Han":











Of course lapels are also Western:



as are epaulettes:



Still think I'm exaggerating about how bad Eurocentrism is?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2021, 03:38:08 am by 90sRetroFan »

rp

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2021, 10:49:40 am »
"Jeans and T-shirts are Counterculture clothes, not Western clothes."

But jeans were invented by the Jew Levi Strauss though.. and you pointed this out:
https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/if-western-civilization-does-not-die-soon/msg5549/#msg5549
« Last Edit: April 16, 2021, 10:51:54 am by rp »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2021, 10:16:16 pm »
Yes, but jeans did not become fashionable until associated with Counterculture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeans#20th_century_evolution

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After James Dean popularized them in the movie Rebel Without a Cause, wearing jeans became a symbol of youth rebellion during the 1950s.[23][24] During the 1960s the wearing of jeans became more acceptable, and by the 1970s it had become general fashion in the United States for casual wear.[25] In Japan in 1977, a professor of Osaka University Philip Karl Pehda chastised a female student wearing jeans in the classroom. Then he was protested by the students, and a controversy arose in the country.[26][27]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Dean#Legacy_and_iconic_status

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Numerous commentators have asserted that Dean had a singular influence on the development of rock and roll music. According to David R. Shumway, a researcher in American culture and cultural theory at Carnegie Mellon University, Dean was the first iconic figure of youthful rebellion and "a harbinger of youth-identity politics". The persona Dean projected in his movies, especially Rebel Without a Cause, influenced Elvis Presley[108] and many other musicians who followed,[109] including the American rockers Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent.

In their book, Live Fast, Die Young: The Wild Ride of Making Rebel Without a Cause, Lawrence Frascella and Al Weisel wrote, "Ironically, though Rebel had no rock music on its soundtrack, the film's sensibility—and especially the defiant attitude and effortless cool of James Dean—would have a great impact on rock. The music media would often see Dean and rock as inextricably linked [...] The industry trade magazine Music Connection even went so far as to call Dean 'the first rock star'."[110]

As rock and roll became a revolutionary force that affected the culture of countries around the world,[111] Dean acquired a mythic status that cemented his place as a rock and roll icon.[112]
« Last Edit: April 16, 2021, 10:20:42 pm by 90sRetroFan »

rp

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2021, 10:41:04 pm »
"Yes, but jeans did not become fashionable until associated with Counterculture"
The same could be said of New Age Hedonism....

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2021, 10:44:49 pm »
What are you proposing?

rp

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2021, 10:47:46 pm »
I am saying that we should not praise all things Counterculture because some of them are Jewish.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2021, 10:56:54 pm »
Yes, Jews are experts at controlling dissent by leading it.

This is unrelated to our need to establish that Counterculture is not to be referred to as "Western", an academic error which is currently causing a lot of confusion as many who claim to be "anti-Western" are actually anti-Counterculture.

If you want to critique Counterculture, please start a new topic here:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/counterculture-era/

rp

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2021, 11:22:23 pm »
So would opposing jeans necessarily make one Western? Shouldn't non-Westerners also oppose jeans since they are after all a Western invention?

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2021, 12:21:35 am »
"So would opposing jeans necessarily make one Western?"

Not necessarily. But anyone who opposes jeans MORE THAN they oppose anything within Western dress code (informal and above) is Western, since in effect they imply that Western is superior to Counterculture.

"Shouldn't non-Westerners also oppose jeans since they are after all a Western invention?"

You may personally prefer some non-Western types of trousers over jeans, but you should still give credit to pro-jeans fashion movements for the significant part they played in chipping away at Western dress code during the Counterculture era:

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Distressed denim emerged from the cultural punk movement in the 1970s. Early punks tore apart consumer goods as an expression of their anger towards society.[52] Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols manifested the British punk ideology, which was fighting against the status quo. Denim became a key target of this politically fueled deconstruction, with both men and women donning torn pants and jackets, accessorized with safety pins and slogans. The trend became popular again in the 1990s with the emergence of grunge fashion. If punk was "anti-fashion", grunge was "non-fashion". The grunge youth wore loose-fitting ripped jeans, flannel shirts or woolen Pendletons layered over T-shirts. Their anti-conformist approach to fashion led to the popularization of the casual chic look, a trend which continued into the 2000s.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2021, 12:24:37 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2021, 10:20:09 pm »
While on the subject, let me mention one element of Western dress that has always irritated me: sexually dimorphic button placement:



This does not happen with the clothes of any other civilization, thereby once again demonstrating Western inferiority in its unique obsession with sexual dimorphism.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/03/the-curious-case-of-men-and-womens-buttons/388844/

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Women’s and men’s shirts and jackets differ not just in terms of how they’re cut, but also in how they’re oriented: To the person wearing them, men’s dress shirts have their buttons on the right, while women’s have them on the left.

This is not a big thing, but it is a weird thing: Every day, millions of people are walking around with these little reminders of gender inequality emblazoned on their chests. There are different theories as to why the discrepancy exists in the first place, but all of them come down to this: The Button Differential is a relic of an old tradition that we have ported, rather unthinkingly, into the contemporary world.
...
“To insure that an enemy's lance point would not slip between the plates,” curators write in The Art of Chivalry: European Arms and Armor from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, “they overlapped from left to right, since it was standard fighting practice that the left side, protected by the shield, was turned toward the enemy. Thus, men's jackets button left to right even to the present day.”

You can extend the theory even further back (as in, waaaaaay further back). As Katherine Lester puts it in Accessories of Dress, “a man's role as hunter required that he pull a weapon from left to right. Fastening a garment from right to left would impede the movement of our ancestors.”
...
Okay. So that (mostly) explains why men’s buttons are on the right. But then, why are women’s on the left?

One theory: babies. Given right-hand dominance, women tend to hold their infants in their left arms, keeping their right arms relatively free. So shirts whose open flap is on the right, one theory goes, makes it easier for them to open with those free hands for breastfeeding.

Another theory: horses. Women, to the extent women rode horses, rode sidesaddle, to the right—so putting their shirt and dress buttons on the left reduced, to some extent, the breeze that would flow into their shirts as they were trotting along.

Sidesaddle is also not present in any other civilization, though many civilizations adopted horseriding from Turanians. So we have yet another example of Western inferiority in its unique obsession with sexual dimorphism. Here we have the buttons and the saddle (and the subhuman face) in one picture:



By the way:

https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2014/10/06/sidesaddles-suffragettes-fight-ride-vote/

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because it placed the majority of the weight on one side, it routinely injured the horse’s back. Plus, because of the long flapping riding dress hanging along his left flank, a “lady’s horse” had to be exceptionally well-trained, which translated into “expensive.” Finally, because of its bad fit, grooms were known to girth a sidesaddle up so tightly that the horse had trouble breathing.

But:

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Nevertheless, a noted British riding master, Colonel Hitchcock, urged women to continue with the method because, “the sidesaddle is the most decorative, dignified, and graceful method, and pleases the male eye, which prefers the ultra-feminine woman to the type which emulates the male in attire or atmosphere.”

**** Westerners.....
« Last Edit: April 18, 2021, 01:38:14 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2021, 01:43:18 am »
While we're at it, let's look at a few other sexual dimorphism enhancements unique to colonial-era Western dress:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bustle











https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pannier_(clothing)







https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corset







And for men:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codpiece



Yes, the one on the right actually has a FACE on it! Westerners want to be literal dickheads!







Anyone who tells you Western civilization is not the most sexist civilization in history is lying.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 01:45:28 am by 90sRetroFan »

guest5

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2021, 01:07:55 am »
There's a joke about Westerners polishing their codpiece lurking around in my brain somewhere that I heard from someone once, but I forget how it goes. The fact that they actually put a face on one though should be all anyone needs see to come to the realization Westerners are some of the most mentally disturbed people in all of human history.  :D

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2021, 12:18:18 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/model-rawdah-mohamed-using-social-170400624.html

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Model Rawdah Mohamed On Using Social Media to Challenge France’s Proposed Hijab Ban
...
I wanted my oppressors to see my face and the women who look like me. They don't get to hide in their luxurious parliament offices and regulate the female body without a fight. I want my face—and all of our faces—to always be remembered.

OK, let's get this done first (incoming Aryan phenotype alert!):







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This ban disproportionately harms the right of women to manifest their freedom of religion. It is devastating. There is risk of marginalization which will also exclude hijabi women from the public spaces, and the ban can also weaponize oppressive and aggressive ideologies that continue to target us. For women this means daily discrimination in workplaces and out in the public. As reported by CCIF (The Collective Against Islamophobia in France) there were 676 registered Islamophobic acts in 2018 and seventy percent of those targeted were women, with fifty-five percent of those acts being committed by institutions. This is a highly dangerous xenophobic and anti- Muslim climate that we must move past together.

As a Muslim hijabi woman who often works in France, I believe this ban stems from discrimination and deeply rooted stereotypes against women of my religion. In my work as a fashion model, I constantly have to fight against inaccurate representation and biased perceptions that have been politicized, which are further reinforced through media outlets and then perpetuated within the general public and the fashion industry. I see this ban as yet another obstacle placed in the way of Muslim womens’ participation in society. The only thing this bill will accomplish is separating Muslim women from the public space.

The obstacles Muslim women face appear in all facets of their lives, including work. However, the times I have met creative people in the fashion industry have all been positive experiences—whether I have encountered designers, fashion editors, or stylists. I have been on numerous shoots where clients were eager to learn about the hijab and are open to explore the identity of today’s Muslim women and how to best portray us. On my first runway, the stylist along with the creative director let me choose between various hijab of the fashion house and allowed me to illustrate different ways I would style the hijab.

The real challenge, and the most discrimination I have felt, comes from the gatekeepers of the industry, mainly those in public relations and casting directors. As a result, I have felt hindered from the opportunity to meet the visionaries behind the brands. Those whom I meet before the client have often been perpetuators of the inaccurate representation of what it means to be a hijabi woman. They are in search of their one girl, their token card, and if you are not willing to play along with their biased perceptions, you are as good as banned from many jobs. They dominate the market and have exclusive control over multiple fashion houses and their strategies.

This is why nothing less than boycotting all Eurocentric brands is needed. So long as they know enough people will keep buying their products no matter how badly they behave, what incentive have they to improve their behaviour?