Author Topic: Dress decolonization  (Read 4066 times)

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #30 on: April 23, 2021, 10:48:03 pm »
Today we will ridicule the complexity of one of the most definitive and most annoying elements of Western dress:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necktie

Quote
The necktie that spread from Europe traces back to Croatian mercenaries serving in France during the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648). These mercenaries from the Croatian Military Frontier, wearing their traditional small, knotted neckerchiefs, aroused the interest of the Parisians.[2] Because of the difference between the Croatian word for Croats, Hrvati, and the French word, Croates, the garment gained the name cravat (cravate in French).[3] The boy-king Louis XIV began wearing a lace cravat around 1646, when he was seven, and set the fashion for French nobility. This new article of clothing started a fashion craze in Europe; both men and women wore pieces of fabric around their necks. From its introduction by the French king, men wore lace cravats, or jabots, that took a large amount of time and effort to arrange. These cravats were often tied in place by cravat strings, arranged neatly and tied in a bow.

International Necktie Day is celebrated on October 18 in Croatia and in various cities around the world, including in Dublin, Tübingen, Como, Tokyo, Sydney and other towns.[4][5]


I just came over from watching TYT make fun of Carlson wearing a bowtie, so let's start with the bowtie:







The cravat is worse, however:



And of course the standard tie is the worst:

Quote
the four-in-hand knot. The four-in-hand knot may be the most common.
the Pratt knot (the Shelby knot)
the half-Windsor knot
the Windsor knot (also redundantly called the "full Windsor" and the "Double Windsor").
...
Small knot (also "oriental knot", "Kent knot"): the smallest possible necktie knot. It forms an equilateral triangle, like the half-Windsor, but much more compact (Fink–Mao notation: Lo Ri Co T, Knot 1). It is also the smallest knot to begin inside-out.
Nicky knot: an alternative version of the Pratt knot, but better-balanced and self-releasing (Lo Ci Ro Li Co T, Knot 4). Supposedly named for Nikita Khrushchev, it tends to be equally referred to as the Pratt knot in men's style literature. This is the version of the Pratt knot favored by Fink and Mao.
Atlantic knot: a reversed Pratt knot, highlighting the structure of the knot normally hidden on the back. In order for the wide blade to remain in front and rightside-out, the knot must begin rightside-out, and the thin end must be wrapped around the wide end. (Ri Co Ri Lo Ci T; not catalogued by Fink and Mao, but would be numbered 5r according to their classification.)
Prince Albert knot (also "double knot", "cross Victoria knot"): A variant of the four-in-hand with an extra pass of the wide blade around the front, before passing the wide blade through both of the resultant loops (Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T, Knot 62). A version knotted through only the outermost loop is known as the Victoria knot (Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T, Knot 6).
Christensen knot (also "cross knot"): An elongated, symmetrical knot, whose main feature is the cruciform structure made by knotting the necktie through the double loop made in the front (Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T, Knot 252). While it can be made with modern neckties, it is most effective with thinner ties of consistent width, which fell out of common use after the 19th century.
Ediety knot (also "Merovingian knot"): a doubled Atlantic knot, best known as the tie knot worn by the character "the Merovingian" in the 2003 film The Matrix Reloaded. This tie can be knotted with the thin end over the wide end, as with the Atlantic knot, or with the wide end over the thin end to mimic the look seen in the film, with the narrow blade in front. (Ri Co Ri Lo Ci Ri Co Ri Lo Ci T – not catalogued by Fink and Mao, as its 10 moves exceed their parameters.)
Victoria knot
Eldredge knot
Trinity knot
Tulip knot
Vidalia knot
Caped Eldredge knot
Trinity-Eldredge knot
St.Andrew knot
Balthus knot
Hanover knot
Grantchester knot
Plattsburgh knot

http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~tmf20/85ways.shtml

Quote
THE 85 WAYS TO TIE A TIE
...
There is an overwhelming amount of information about knots, knot tying, knot science, knot history, and knot theory in this book.  Think I'm kidding?

In order for you to know how to tie all these 85 different knots, you first have to learn all the different moves:






Finally, if after all the above you still do not consider Western dress to be the most inferior the world, here is a necktie that suits you:

« Last Edit: March 12, 2022, 10:40:04 pm by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2021, 10:32:56 pm »
Another uniquely Western item that has has always annoyed me is the handbag. Ever since I was a child, I did not understand why women's clothes did not have pockets while men's clothes did. Either pockets are a good idea, in which case they should be used by everyone, or they are a bad idea, in which case they should be used by no one. This was actually how it was in non-Western civilizations. Western civilization, of course, only cares about sexual dimorphism:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handbag

Quote
In the 17th century, young girls were taught embroidery as a necessary skill for marriage; this also helped them make very beautiful handbags.[3] By the late 18th century, fashions in Europe were moving towards a slender shape for these accessories, inspired by the silhouettes of Ancient Greece and Rome. Women wanted purses that would not be bulky or untidy in appearance, so reticules were designed. Reticules were made of fine fabrics like silk and velvet, carried with wrist straps. First becoming popular in France, they crossed over into Britain, where they became known as "indispensables."[4] Men, however, did not adopt the trend. They used purses and pockets, which became popular in men's trousers.[5]

The modern purse, clutch, pouch, or handbag came about in England during the Industrial Revolution, in part due to the increase in travel by railway. In 1841 the Doncaster industrialist and confectionery entrepreneur Samuel Parkinson (of butterscotch fame) ordered a set of traveling cases and trunks and insisted on a traveling case or bag for his wife's particulars after noticing that her purse was too small and made from a material that would not withstand the journey. He stipulated that he wanted various handbags for his wife, varying in size for different occasions, and asked that they be made from the same leather that was being used for his cases and trunks to distinguish them from the then-familiar carpetbag and other travelers' cloth bags used by members of the popular classes. H. J. Cave (London) obliged and produced the first modern set of luxury handbags, as we would recognize them today, including a clutch and a tote (named as 'ladies traveling case').
...
In the early 20th century, Sigmund Freud argued that purses were sexually suggestive as the structure of the purse symbolized female genitalia and sexuality. ... Freud compared women retrieving items from their purse as a representation of ****. According to Freud’s argument, women who carried purses openly displayed their sexuality due to the sexual symbolism of the purse.[7]

As if this were not bad enough, Western critics of handbags based their opposition also on sexual dimorphism!

Quote
many critics said that women did not need them and that bags of such size and heavy material would 'break the backs of ladies.'

This is Western civilization for you.....
« Last Edit: December 18, 2021, 08:43:09 pm by 90sRetroFan »

Zhang Caizhi

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2021, 05:40:53 am »
I am not sure if Thai student uniforms in Thai public schools are based on western student uniforms or not.
Every student in Thai public schools have to wear the uniform regulated by the Ministry of Education of Thailand like in the image below.


90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #33 on: April 25, 2021, 11:56:04 pm »
While it has been modified to suit the warmer climate, I am fairly sure that it was based on a Western template. The folded collars, the shoes, etc. are dead giveaways.

This goes back to:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Thai_clothing#Modern_Rattanakosin

Quote
From the 1860s onward, Thai royals "selectively adopted Victorian corporeal and sartorial etiquette to fashion modern personas that were publicized domestically and internationally by means of mechanically reproduced images."[11] Stitched clothing, including court attire and ceremonial uniforms, were invented during the reign of King Chulalongkorn.[11] Western forms of dress became popular among urbanites in Bangkok during this time period.[11] During the early 1900s, King Vajiravudh launched a campaign to encourage Thai women to wear long hair instead of traditional short hair, and to wear pha sinh (ผ้าซิ่น), a tubular skirt, instead of the chong kraben (โจงกระเบน), a cloth wrap.[12]
...
On 15 January 1941, Plaek Pibulsonggram issued a Thai cultural mandate to modernize and westernize Thai dress, by deeming long-practiced customs of wearing underpants, wearing no shirt, or wearing a wraparound cloth, as forms of inappropriate public attire.[13]

This is what we are here to reverse.

At least the uniform shown does not include neckties! That is the only good thing about it.

Zhang Caizhi

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #34 on: April 26, 2021, 12:36:17 am »
Brief differences between male and female students in public schools regulated by the Ministry of Education of Thailand:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_uniforms_in_Thailand

Quote
Boys

Shirts
Most male students wear a white shirt with a left breast pocket. Initials or logo on the left breast and the name of the school or student ID number on the right breast. Embroidery in red or blue.

Pants and belt
Three styles:

Khaki shorts with brown leather belt
Black shorts with leather belt in black or brown
Blue shorts with belt, black or brown

Shoes and socks
Two styles:

Khaki shorts wears brown socks and brown shoes
Black or blue shorts wears white socks and black shoes

Girls

Blouses
Elementary students: White blouse similar to boy's shirts, untucked shirt tails
Secondary school: White blouse similar to boy's shirts, can have a ribbon and untucked shirt tails
Upper secondary students: White shirt similar to boy's shirts

Skirt
Navy blue with six pleats in front and six in back

Shoes and socks
Black leather shoes and white socks
« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 12:38:05 am by Zhang Caizhi »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2021, 12:50:24 am »
What pathological Eurocentrism looks like:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3VVZAVuLtU



90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2021, 02:27:16 am »
North Korea just doesn't get it:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/north-korea-bans-mullet-haircuts-151158799.html

Quote
North Korea has banned mullets, certain piercings, and skinny jeans in a bid to keep the country free from "decadent" Western fashion trends.

Counterculture is not Western! Try banning Western suits and neckties instead! Do you realize how colonized you look wearing that ****?


guest5

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Re: Sports as a platform for protest
« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2021, 02:02:33 am »
Robert Kraft Video Reveals How Out Of Touch Rich People Are
Quote
Robert Kraft has a new ride...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfQk-f9B4qk&list=TLPQMTIwNjIwMjEWSoqF3vWqWg&index=9

The comments are interesting....

Eurocentric "blacks" are obviously some of the most disgusting Eurocentricists out there! Eurocentric "black" rappers are just imbeciles to boot, they will all be forgotten once Western civilization dies and the world begins to heal from this nightmare.

The meaning behind the classical paintings in Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s “Apeshit”
Quote
Why it matters that the video takes place in the Louvre.
Quote
And as an artistic choice, the Louvre is par for Beyoncé’s course. For the past few years, Beyoncé has increasingly cribbed from the iconography of classical Western art in her own image-making.
https://www.vox.com/culture/2018/6/19/17476212/apeshit-video-beyonce-jay-z-carters-portrait-negresse-benoist

They obviously only do it because they believe it makes them look "sophisticated" and "classy", by Western standards of course.



Let's pretend for a second "Apeshit" was meant to be offensive toward Western civilization, oh wait never mind, just read the lyrics....



Is Sally Hazelgrove Jewish?





90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #38 on: July 04, 2021, 10:20:57 pm »
Again the Western obsession with sexual dimorphism:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/ukrainian-army-under-fire-making-185100601.html

Quote
Ukrainian army under fire for making female soldiers march in high heels
...
The military did not offer an explanation as to why women were made to march in different footwear than their male comrades, according to the Associated Press.
...
Aside from accusing Ukrainian society as a whole of being “patriarchal” and sexist, a 2016 United Nations study titled “Invisible Battalion” leveled several charges of sexism against the Ukrainian military itself. Analyzing warfare and the military through “feminist studies,” the report accused the military of treating women as "second class," failing to supply them with proper uniforms and hygiene products, and failing to take many of them seriously.

Even civilians should not be wearing high heels! Besides the health effects previously covered:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/western-civilization-is-a-health-hazard/msg43/#msg43

they are part of Western dress code:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dress_shoe#Women's_dress_shoes

Quote
Pumps
Pumps come in a variety of colors and styles. They can have a rounded or pointed toe, and are usually made of leather. They have a heel of at least 5 cm (2 inches)[citation needed]. Today, pumps have evolved beyond the classic working woman's shoe. Now, there are peep toe pumps, which have a small opening at the toes. There are also pumps with ankle straps. Not only have the styles evolved, the fabrics have as well. While almost all pumps used to be made of leather, pumps now come in a variety of materials, such as suede and wool.

Slingbacks
The slingback is similar to the pump in that it can have a rounded or pointed toe and usually has a heel, but it doesn't wrap all the way around the heel like pumps usually do. Instead, it has a narrow strap that is pulled up over the heel, leaving the rest of the heel exposed.

Loafers
Loafers are usually flat and typically thought of as both more masculine and comfortable than anything with a heel. The typical loafer has a round toe, and comes in darker colors, such as black or brown. A spin on the loafer is the cloak, which, like the loafer, is a slip-on shoe, but it has a heel and is considered a more "feminine" design.

Mules
Mules are shoes that slide onto the foot, and do not cover the heel or the back of the foot at all. These aren't considered dress shoes unless they have a heel.

and hence should be rejected on decolonization grounds alone. And of course the ultimate intent behind their design is to increase sexual dimorphism, therefore they should be rejected for this reason too.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #39 on: July 19, 2021, 09:49:00 pm »
And again. What is it about sexual dimorphism that is so important to Westerners?

https://www.yahoo.com/news/norwegian-womens-beach-handball-team-172201500.html

Quote
The Norwegian women's beach-handball team is facing fines for choosing to wear shorts at the European championship instead of bikini bottoms, according to a statement issued by the European Handball Federation (EHF) on Monday.
...
"Women should wear a bikini where the top should be a tight-fitting sports bra with deep openings at the arms. The bottom must not be more than ten centimeters on the sides," the regulations say.
...
Meanwhile, regulations for men's uniforms say that participants must wear "tight-fitting tank tops" and longer shorts "that are not too baggy" but "should be 10 centimeters above the kneecap."

It is clear that this has nothing to do with ergonomic efficiency. (Either bikini bottoms are more efficient, in which case men should also wear them, or else shorts are more efficient, in which case women should also wear them.) This is purely about the Western insistence that men and women dress differently even when performing the exact same activity, purely in order to accentuate sexual dimorphism.

(Rightists who claim that Islam etc. also requires women to dress differently than men completely miss the point, which is that Islamic dress codes try to reduce women's visible sexual dimorphism as opposed to Western dress codes which try to increase women's visible sexual dimorphism. It is incredible that I even need to explain this.....)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AHeOUOzcCw
« Last Edit: July 21, 2021, 03:47:56 am by 90sRetroFan »

Zea_mays

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #40 on: July 23, 2021, 11:16:47 am »

https://i.redd.it/16sgacgj3tc71.jpg

---------

I couldn't find any articles written about this, but I have heard about a number of different "black" professors and intellectuals who wear Western 1700s-style clothing in 'protest' of Eurocentrism. I guess they wait for people to ask why they are wearing weird clothes and then go on a long rant about something. But 99% of the people who see them from afar probably think they are just colonial junkies on their way to a Renaissance fair.

--

On a different note, here is an another article about denim's association with the Civil Rights Movement. Within the movement, there was a battle between those who wanted to appear respectable by "white" standards, and those who rebelled by rejecting "respectable" Western forms of clothing.
Quote
While Elvis Presley and the cast of Rebel Without a Cause helped spark a new appreciation for bootcuts among the Youthquake culture, most people considered them too closely linked with the working man to wear them. For example, in 1969 nearly 200 students got suspended from their high school for wearing dark blue pants because they too closely resembled blue jeans. They were mostly something you wore while cleaning out the garage, not something you put on for cocktails.
[...]
But the revolutionaries on the front pages of newspapers helped denim become a staple in everyday people’s wardrobes. “It took Martin Luther King’s march on Washington to make them popular,” wrote Caroline A. Jones, author of Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist. “It was here that civil rights activists were photographed wearing the poor sharecropper's blue denim overalls to dramatize how little had been accomplished since Reconstruction.”

While at first activists snapped on their overalls out of practicality — they were tired of mending tears from attack dogs and high-pressure hoses, and jeans could withstand the abuse — they also put them on to bring back a not-too-distant past. They used to be referred to as ‘Negro clothes’ — slave owners bought denim for their enslaved workers, partly because the material was sturdy, and partly because it helped contrast them against the linen suits and lace parasols of plantation families — and their inclusion in the civil rights movement suggested that pointed societal divide. For much of the black community, the activists’ symbolism was obvious. Separate then; separate now.

“There were some African Americans who felt that to wear jeans was disrespectful to yourself,” says James Sullivan, author of Jeans: A Cultural History of an American Icon. “For many African Americans, denim workwear represented a painful reminder of the old sharecropper system. James Brown, for one, refused to wear jeans, and for years forbade his band members from wearing them.” Sullivan points out that if you look at pictures of the sons and daughters of the sharecropper generations of the early 20th century who moved north to get away from the fields, you’ll notice that they wore suits, ties, and hats to their factory jobs, partly to create that distance.
[...]
Although some protestors knew their white neighbors would chafe against seeing them walk the streets in sharecropper clothes — and used that to their advantage — the strategy wasn't promoted by all Freedom Fighters. Respectability politics was still a popular tactic for gaining support. In 1965, before gearing up to drive down to three hard-core segregationist states in the Deep South to register people to vote, a NAACP representative went to the front of the room during a secret civil rights meeting in New York City, and flatly declared, “We don't want any girls in blue jeans. We don't want any boys in beards.” They wanted people’s hair pressed and collars crisp, knowing how quickly the evening news would misrepresent them if they came in anything less than their Sunday best.
[...]
by putting on the working man’s uniform, revolutionaries showed they didn’t have to dress in a way their white peers deemed “acceptable” in order to gain the rights that were theirs to begin with. Even if activists showed up in banker’s pinstripes, that wouldn’t convert segregationists into allies. “No matter what the whites’ sense of justice tells them needs to be done for Negroes, are they going to let themselves to be bulldozed into doing it?” asked the Missouri Springfield Leader and Press in 1967. Whites refused to be “pushed” toward equality. The movement’s clothes weren’t the issue, and having their appearance policed was just another way of being controlled.

Denim was very much the look of the black freedom struggle, but like most nonconformist messages — from the anti-establishment punks with their queen’s tartan to the anti-capitalist beatniks with their berets — it was co-opted by the mainstream; taken out of its original context in order to fit into people’s wardrobes. But unlike those well-known and heavily referenced underground movements, most people aren’t aware which of their denim styles were copied from civil rights protestors. Instead, those same styles were lauded as “new.”
https://www.racked.com/2017/10/30/16496866/denim-civil-rights-movement-blue-jeans-history

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #41 on: July 23, 2021, 11:25:44 pm »
"I have heard about a number of different "black" professors and intellectuals who wear Western 1700s-style clothing in 'protest' of Eurocentrism. I guess they wait for people to ask why they are wearing weird clothes and then go on a long rant about something. But 99% of the people who see them from afar probably think they are just colonial junkies on their way to a Renaissance fair."

This sounds like a stupid idea to me. It would be equivalent to us as anti-Zionists walking around wearing kippahs!

Quote
it helped contrast them against the linen suits and lace parasols of plantation families

See also:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/western-civilization-is-ugly-48/msg6283/#msg6283


Avena_sativa

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #42 on: July 25, 2021, 01:54:06 pm »
Quote
Islamic dress codes try to reduce women's visible sexual dimorphism as opposed to Western dress codes which try to increase women's visible sexual dimorphism. It is incredible that I even need to explain this
I actually think that this needs to be explained further, especially when we consider that many False Leftists who receive our propaganda share similar positions (often in agreement) with Rightists on the topic of Mohammedanism. Generally, False Leftists who hold some form of anti-colonial/anti-western/anti-“white” beliefs already agree that Islamic dress codes are at least superior to Western dress codes. However, explicit discussions of sexual dimorphism being the reason for this superiority may result in the more idealistically-motivated False Leftists (especially ones who claim to be anti-traditionalist) seeing contemporary Islamic dress codes as visually sexually dimorphic in their own right on account of such codes employing different articles of clothing for men than for women and on account of the perception that those dress codes reduce the visual sexual dimorphism of women without simultaneously reducing the visual sexual dimorphism of men to the same degree.

This may produce positive results, such as the motivation to improve existing Islamic dress codes. It also could produce negative results, such as False Leftists drawing an incorrect conclusion that Mohammedanism views women as more sexually dimorphic than men. I believe this potential confusion could be proactively prevented if we are able to communicate an idealized version of the Islamic dress code according to Mohammedan standards to the audience receiving our message. What might such a dress code look like relative to the existing ones?
« Last Edit: July 25, 2021, 02:06:33 pm by Avena_sativa »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #43 on: July 25, 2021, 10:25:01 pm »
"contemporary Islamic dress codes as visually sexually dimorphic in their own right on account of such codes employing different articles of clothing for men than for women"

The key is to clearly explain that different dress practices for men and for women does not necessarily correspond to celebration of sexual dimorphism, so long as the particular practices are designed to disguise (rather than accentuate) the sexual dimorphism of the practitioners.

"those dress codes reduce the visual sexual dimorphism of women without simultaneously reducing the visual sexual dimorphism of men to the same degree."

This is a valid criticism and one which I have raised myself in the past. Why should women do more work than men in dressing up? They should not. But the point here is that Western dress also requires women to do more work than men in dressing up, yet this extra work is done by women in order to increase their visible sexual dimorphism! Thus both Western and Islamic dress codes (sadly) require women to do more work, but for opposite objectives, and comparing only the objectives allows us to conclude that Islamic dress code is at least trying to aim in a good direction (albeit with much room for improvement).

"an idealized version of the Islamic dress code according to Mohammedan standards to the audience receiving our message. What might such a dress code look like relative to the existing ones?"

The main issue is how to cover hair. I personally would say that hats/turbans are adequate, though societies which want headscarves should be allowed to keep using them on the condition that men be required to wear them also. I also support the alternative of shaving the head.

Related:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/re-genghis-khan/msg4142/#msg4142

Zea_mays

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #44 on: July 26, 2021, 12:27:38 pm »
Quote
This sounds like a stupid idea to me. It would be equivalent to us as anti-Zionists walking around wearing kippahs!

I still can't find any articles about US professors/intellectuals doing this, but I stumbled across this article about Namibians. (See articles for pictures).

Quote
The Namibians who STILL dress like their colonial masters: Tribe clings to 19th century dress 'to protest against the Germans who butchered them'

    Anthropologists believe the dress of the Herero tribe is a fascinating subversion of their former rulers' fashion
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2286624/The-Namibian-women-STILL-dress-like-colonists-Tribe-clings-19th-century-dress-protest-Germans-butchered-them.html

Maybe 100 years ago it was a triumph over colonialism, now it's just plain colonialism.

Quote
Naughten told TIME that, according to custom, whenever a Herero warrior would kill a German soldier they would take his uniform, considered to be a badge of honor and an act that would symbolically “take their power.”

Today, many of the uniforms are merely bartered, bought or sold, but the influence of the early German colonial wares has led the Herero to adopt other more European elements of fashion. In this remote corner of the Namib, European style of dress has become a celebrated aspect of the modern Herero’s identity.
https://time.com/3797199/jim-naughten-conflict-and-costume-in-namibia/

-----

This website may be a useful resource when examining colonization and decolonization in fashion:

https://fashionandrace.org/database/vision-statement/