Author Topic: Dress decolonization  (Read 4495 times)

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #60 on: December 22, 2021, 09:39:00 pm »
And don't even get me started on the further Western inferiority called:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_cleaning

Quote
Dry cleaning still involves liquid, but clothes are instead soaked in a water-free liquid solvent, tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene), known in the industry as "perc", which is the most widely used solvent. Alternative solvents are 1-bromopropane and petroleum spirits.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachloroethylene

Quote
The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified tetrachloroethylene as a Group 2A carcinogen, which means that it is probably carcinogenic to humans.[10] Like many chlorinated hydrocarbons, tetrachloroethylene is a central nervous system depressant and can enter the body through respiratory or dermal exposure.[11] Tetrachloroethylene dissolves fats from the skin, potentially resulting in skin irritation.

Animal studies and a study of 99 twins showed there is a "lot of circumstantial evidence" that exposure to tetrachloroethylene increases the risk of developing Parkinson's disease ninefold. Larger population studies are planned.[12] Also, tetrachloroethylene has been shown to cause liver tumors in mice and kidney tumors in male rats.[13]
...
Tetrachloroethylene exposure has been linked to pronounced acquired color vision deficiencies after chronic exposure.[22]
...
Tetrachloroethylene is a problematic soil contaminant because its density causes it to sink below the water table, inhibiting cleanup activities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Bromopropane

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In the EU, 1-bromopropane has been classified as reproductive toxicant per Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals, which makes it a "substance of very high concern".[11]
...
In 2013, a peer-review panel convened by the U.S. National Toxicology Program unanimously recommended that 1-bromopropane, be classified as reasonably anticipated human carcinogens.[15]
...
Reported symptoms of overexposure affect the nervous system and include confusion, slurred speech, dizziness, paresthesias, and difficulty walking, unusual fatigue and headaches, development of arthralgias, visual disturbances (difficulty focusing), and muscle twitching. Symptoms may persist over one year.[9] Other symptoms include irritation of mucous membranes, eyes, upper respiratory tract, and skin, as well as transient loss of consciousness.[7] Loss of feeling in the feet, an example of paresthesia, is colloquially called "dead foot" by workers who suffer from it.[5]
...
Animal studies of 1-bromopropane have showed that it is a carcinogen in those models.[7] Rodents exposed to 1-bromopropane developed lung, colon, and skin cancer at higher rates.[6]
...
Stratospheric ozone layer damage
...
According to United States Environmental Protection Agency, the ODP is 0.013-0.018 in the US latitudes, and between 0.071-0.100 in tropical latitudes.[17]

See also:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/western-civilization-is-a-health-hazard/

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #61 on: January 01, 2022, 08:33:31 pm »
Since I mentioned the hand dryer over here:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/issues/decolonized-housing-(america-edition)/msg10370/#msg10370

and tumble driers above, I should also mention that hair dryers (obviously also of Western origin) are similarly wasteful, as well as unhealthy:

https://headandshoulders.com/en-us/healthy-hair-and-scalp/hair-care/how-blow-drying-hair-damages-your-scalp

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Blow drying is known to damage your hair. The heat from a dryer can disrupt your hair cuticles and can also put the scalp under strain.

Heat damage on your scalp

When you’re blow drying your hair, that’s not all you’re drying out.

When you blow dry your hair, you’re instantly heating the moisture in both your hair and your scalp.

This causes a knock-on effect:

    Water inside the hair fibre can turn to steam and create permanent damage blisters

    The heat can dry out the scalp



WTF is wrong with Westerners? (Answer: they are Westerners.)

By the way, dress decolonization isn't just about clothes; we can also discuss the inferiority of Western hairstyles here.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2022, 08:35:04 pm by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #62 on: January 03, 2022, 09:04:21 pm »
Let's keep going:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_comb

Quote
A hot comb (also known as a straightening comb or pressing comb) is a metal comb that is used to straighten moderate or coarse hair and create a smoother hair texture.[1] A hot comb is heated and used to straighten the hair from the roots. It can be placed directly on the source of heat or it may be electrically heated.[2]
...
Parisian Francois Marcel Grateau is said to have revolutionized hair styling when he invented and introduced heated irons to curl and wave his customers' hair in France in 1872. His Marcel Wave remained fashionable for many decades. Britain's Science and Society Library credits L. Pelleray of Paris with manufacturing the heated irons in the 1870s.[4]
...
Potential consequences

It is not uncommon to burn and damage hair when using a traditional hot comb. A hot comb is often heated to over 65 degrees Celsius (149 degrees Fahrenheit), therefore if not careful severe burns and scarring can occur.

The hot petrolatum used with the iron was thought to cause a chronic inflammation around the upper segment of the hair follicle leading to degeneration of the external root sheath.[21]

In 1992, a hot comb alopecia study was conducted, and it was discovered that there was a poor correlation between the usage of a hot comb and the onset and progression of disease. The study concludes that the term follicular degeneration syndrome (FDS) is proposed for this clinically and histologically distinct form of scarring alopecia.[22]

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #63 on: January 07, 2022, 03:25:28 am »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/beijing-olympics-ceremonies-uniforms-deemed-231414370.html

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During the medals ceremonies, the Beijing Olympics organizers said that staff will don three designs featuring “traditional Tang dynasty fabrics and other traditional Chinese cultural elements.”

Oh, really?





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“The dress shows the Chinese charm with modern and simple techniques,” the committee wrote.

No, it doesn't! These are wholly Western clothes in idea, with merely tasteless "Chinese" tourist junk pasted on top! Note the long (leather? certainly not cloth) boots (with high heels for the women - see model furthest to the right of the top picture). Note the sexual dimorphism of the collar (centred for men, left over right for women) and the torso shaping (straight down for men, widening below the waist for women). Note the Santa workshop hats. Note the gloves. Note the puffy sleeves. Note the high jacket cutoff of the model furthest to the left of the top picture. This summarizes how deeply the Eurocentrist rot has eaten into China: that which is actually uniquely Western it normalizes as "modern", while what it calls "Chinese" might as well be a self-insult.



It would be bad enough if they were consciously deciding to be Western, but this is worse: they cannot get out of the Western framework even when they are trying to!
« Last Edit: January 07, 2022, 03:34:09 am by 90sRetroFan »

guest55

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #64 on: January 07, 2022, 09:18:10 pm »
Iran claims the "mullet" is a western hairstyle. I would argue that it is not....

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #65 on: January 10, 2022, 01:22:40 am »
Success:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/texas-schools-rethink-gender-based-160100723.html

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Texas Schools Rethink Gender-Based Dress Code Policies After Discrimination Claims Raise New Legal Issues

Hope Cozart was perplexed when she received a letter from her son Maddox’s school in April telling her he needed to cut his hair because it was too long. Even so, she obliged: She took Maddox to get a haircut, which consisted of shaved sides with a little more hair left at the top. Cozart would braid or plait her son’s hair to keep it out of his face.

But school officials from the Troy Independent School District, where Maddox was enrolled at Raymond Mays Middle School, outside of Temple, were still unhappy with the new cut. He was disciplined for breaking his school’s dress code, which at the time prohibited male students from wearing their hair in a ponytail, bun or top knot. Maddox was placed in in-school suspension for more than 10 days and later in lunch detention, Cozart said. Her daughter, who had a similar hairstyle, never faced any issues.

Which proves that the dress code was never motivated by practical considerations, but solely by Western expectations of sexual dimorphism accentuation.

Quote
“He was getting pulled out of class daily, sometimes by multiple teachers, and examined like he was an object,” said Cozart, noting that her son is biracial and that his hair style relates to his Black culture.

Cozart’s experience is part of a series of recent conflicts across the state over school dress codes, some of which have turned into civil rights court battles over gender and race.

In the Houston area, a lawsuit filed against Magnolia ISD in October accused the district of violating Title IX and students’ 14th Amendment protections by prohibiting male students from wearing long hair. This month, the district’s school board reached a settlement agreement and voted to eliminate its gender-based policy on hair.

This is a defeat for Western colonialism and a victory for America. I hardly need to remind everyone that in pre-colonial times, long hair (including mullets!) was the American standard for males as well as females:

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This year, the ACLU of Texas has sent at least two complaints to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights concerning male students of Native American heritage being punished for wearing their hair long, which aligns with their cultural and religious beliefs, according to the organization.

Like so many other issues, hairstyle can unite all victims of Western civilization against our common oppressor:

Quote
Mahogane Reed, an attorney with the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund, said the 2020 case of the Black male students who were disciplined for wearing dreadlocks at Barbers Hill ISD illustrates how sometimes students are caught at an intersection of identities and can be affected by school dress codes that don’t account for cultural intricacies.
...
Binary dress codes have also presented a dilemma for LGBTQ and nonbinary students such as Danielle Miller’s fifth grade child, Tristan, who is nonbinary and one of the seven plaintiffs in the lawsuit against Magnolia ISD.

“When I explained that we would have to adhere to a boy’s dress code [to Tristan], it was just met with complete trauma, and I realized that we weren’t going to be cutting their hair and we’re going to have to do everything we had to to go ahead and fight this because it’s not OK,” Miller said during a media briefing with the ACLU.

Finally, let us recall how they used to treat us not so long ago:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalping#Continued_Indian_Wars

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In 1851, the U.S. Army displayed Indian scalps in Stanislaus County, California. In Tehama County, California, U.S. military and local volunteers razed villages and scalped hundreds of men, women, and children.[47]

Scalping also occurred during the Sand Creek Massacre on November 29, 1864, during the American Indian Wars, when a 700-man force of U.S. Army volunteers destroyed the village of Cheyenne and Arapaho in southeastern Colorado Territory, killing and mutilating[48][49] an estimated 70–163 Native Americans.[50][51][52] An 1867 New York Times article reported that "settlers in a small town in Colorado Territory had recently subscribed $5,000 to a fund ‘for the purpose of buying Indian scalps (with $25 each to be paid for scalps with the ears on)’ and that the market for Indian scalps ‘is not affected by age or sex’." The article noted this behavior was "sanctioned" by the U.S. federal government, and was modeled on patterns the U.S. had begun a century earlier in the "American East".[53]: 206 

From one writer's point of view, it was a "uniquely American" innovation that the use of scalp bounties in the wars against indigenous societies "became an indiscriminate killing process that deliberately targeted Indian non-combatants (including women, children, and infants), as well as warriors."[53]: 204  Some American states such as Arizona paid bounty for enemy Native American scalps.[54]

NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.

Related:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/true-left-breakthrough-degendering/

Zea_mays

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #66 on: January 11, 2022, 12:09:22 pm »
Lol.

The double standard is the point of course, but I will also point out how Boris's hair is at least a departure from the excessive grooming standards of high-maintenance Western hairstyles which were popular from the late 1800s to 1950s.



In the Romantic era in the mid-1800s, it wasn't uncommon for men to have low-maintenance and "unprofessional" hairstyles:






Boris would appear even less respectable if his hair looked "professional", like this:


Or this:





bondburger

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #67 on: January 12, 2022, 11:43:48 am »
What footwear would you recommend wearing? Especially for if doing lots of walking. At most shoe shops I tend to have difficulty finding boots that are both small enough and leather-free, so I don't have much flexibility getting footwear conventionally (I do have leather-free boots, but they're probably not ideal since they're the only affordable ones I was able to find). Is there a nostalgic approach to this?

guest55

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #68 on: January 13, 2022, 07:48:41 pm »
For Americans wouldn't shoes such as the Converse Chuck Taylor All-Stars work?:


Since Converse is now a subsidiary of Nike we can also be sure that none are being sold in Israel anymore....

Quote
Converse started making an early basketball shoe in 1917 and redesigned it in 1922, when Chuck Taylor asked the company to create a better shoe with more support and flexibility. After Converse added Taylor's signature to the ankle patch they became known as Chuck Taylor All Stars. By the 1960s the company had captured about 70 to 80 percent of the basketball shoe market, but the shoe declined in popularity during the 1970s, when more and more basketball players wore other brands of shoes. Chuck Taylor All Stars enjoyed a comeback in popularity in the 1980s as retro-style casual footwear.[3][4]
Quote
Ad from 1920 for the forerunner of the Chuck Taylor All Star, Converse "Non-Skids."

Marquis Mills Converse founded the Converse Rubber Shoe Company in 1908 in Malden, Massachusetts. In 1917 the company designed the forerunner of the modern All Star shoe that it marketed under the name of "Non-Skids." The shoe was composed of a rubber sole and canvas upper and was designed for basketball players.[citation needed]

In 1921, Charles "Chuck" Taylor, an American semi-professional basketball player, joined Converse as a salesman.[5] Within a year of Taylor's arrival, the company had adopted his ideas for improvements to the shoe's design to enhance its flexibility and ankle support. The restyled shoe also incorporated a distinctive All-Star logo on the circular patch that protected the ankle. After Taylor's signature was added to the ankle patch as his endorsement, they became known as Chuck Taylor All Stars, the first celebrity-endorsed athletic shoe.[6][7]

To promote sales of Converse All Star shoes to basketball players, Taylor held basketball clinics in high school and college gyms and YMCAs all across the United States and taught the fundamentals of the game.[8] During the 1926–27 season Taylor also served as a player-manager of the company-sponsored basketball team called the Converse All Stars. The Chicago-based touring team was established to promote sales of the company's All Star basketball shoes.[9]

Numerous professional basketball players were soon wearing All Stars. The shoes also became popular among younger basketball players, including athletes in the Olympic Games and American soldiers in the 1940s. Converse All Stars were the official shoe of the Olympics from 1936 to 1968.[6][10] During World War II All Stars were the official athletic training shoes of the U.S. armed forces.[6]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Taylor_All-Stars


SirGalahad

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #69 on: January 15, 2022, 05:05:55 pm »
@Mazda My main issue with Converse is that they're such a pain to put on. Especially the ones that go up to the ankle, like in the picture you showed. I kind of avoid shoes with shoelaces in general. I prefer sandals, shoes with velcro straps, or even the Vans slip-ons, which are very convenient:



Maybe I'm just lazy when it comes to shoes, and maybe I'm just overly passionate about a minor annoyance, but I feel like shoelaces were a pointless invention. Plus, if I'm in a hurry, I have to fight to loosen the shoe enough for me to shove my foot into it
« Last Edit: January 15, 2022, 05:14:48 pm by SirGalahad »

bondburger

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #70 on: January 15, 2022, 07:27:57 pm »
Maybe I'm just lazy when it comes to shoes, and maybe I'm just overly passionate about a minor annoyance, but I feel like shoelaces were a pointless invention. Plus, if I'm in a hurry, I have to fight to loosen the shoe enough for me to shove my foot into it

Completely get your frustrations here, and perhaps this is just me not being great at tying them, but shoelaces coming undone drives me mad. Some laces seem to come undone way too easily and completely interrupt a walk or a run. I get why to have them on walking boots, but on indoor or running shoes... no.
Wearing velcro shoes was the kind of thing you'd get teased for at school in my experience - "you STILL use velcro?". There may well be plenty of advantages that shoelaces do have, but the main motivation for learning them seemed to be looking more mature, doing things the harder cleverer way to show you're not stupid. Very progressive.
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90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #71 on: January 23, 2022, 04:38:20 am »
Every time I think our enemies cannot possibly get more obsessed about sexual dimorphism, I am proven wrong:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOBKPQOnKPM

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #72 on: February 12, 2022, 12:55:51 am »
Encouraging signs:

https://us.yahoo.com/lifestyle/jade-jewelry-became-symbol-hope-180800477.html

Quote
I recall growing up with peers who deemed jade outdated and aging. When I was a teen, it wasn't exactly cool to wear a Buddha on the traditional red string, or a circular Bi disc pendant. (We used to jokingly call them Lifesavers, but it’s actually a classic shape that dates back to the Neolithic era and symbolizes heaven.) Jade was what your grandmother or elderly aunts would wear. At its most extreme, wearing the stone suggested you were not properly assimilated — a terrifying thought for a kid facing strong social pressure to adopt the customs and aesthetics of the dominant American culture. But while my friends may have failed to see the value in jade during our teens, it's undeniably back.
...
“I’m half Chinese and third-generation, so I used to associate the stone with older women. I always assumed I wasn't ‘Chinese enough’ to wear it. As I have become more confident in my background, my jade jewelry has even more meaning for me. It’s something I wear proudly that announces my heritage.”

Actually, jade is also American:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jade_use_in_Mesoamerica

so wearing it doesn't make you more Chinese but less American; it makes you more Chinese and simultaneously more American. Jade should really be another medium to help America and China feel closer to each other (especially in opposition to our former common colonizers).

American jade:



Chinese jade:



Homo Hubris jewellry:



Exercise: find the odd one out.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2022, 01:04:18 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #73 on: March 12, 2022, 10:32:31 pm »
https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20220311-leftist-gabriel-boric-the-president-breaking-new-ground-in-chile

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Whether refusing to wear a tie, shunning the upscale neighborhoods of Chile's political elites or naming a majority woman cabinet, Boric has already shown his presidency will be a clean break from what has come before in the South American country.
...
while he has adopted jackets, he shuns ties and makes no attempt to hide his tattoos.

Well done for not wearing a tie, but I hope he can take it a step further and instead of a Western jacket wear something like this:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poncho

Quote
Ponchos have been used by the Native American peoples of the Andes and Patagonia since pre-Hispanic times, from places now under the territory of Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, and Argentina and are now considered typical South American garments.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2022, 10:45:14 pm by 90sRetroFan »

rp

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Re: Dress decolonization
« Reply #74 on: March 19, 2022, 12:10:22 am »
Palestinian wedding in Sarasota, FL:
https://youtu.be/lF44-6vlhns