Author Topic: Name decolonization  (Read 1899 times)

90sRetroFan

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Name decolonization
« on: July 01, 2020, 02:04:15 am »
OLD CONTENT

Many places today bear names resultant from colonialism, which should be changed in order to reflect decolonization. The hubris of the colonialists was such that they did not even bother to use the pre-existing namesof the lands they colonized, but treated these lands as nothing but free real estate:

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Thisis not an exaggeration; for example, the name "Rhodesia" (after Cecil Rhodes) is literally no different than Donald Trump naming golf courses etc. after himself. Zambia set a good example by tossing out the name "Northern Rhodesia" in 1964; we hope many more follow suit in future.

A few of the more obvious ones:

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The name of the Philippines (Filipino: Pilipinas [pɪlɪˈpinɐs]; Spanish: Filipinas) is a truncated form of Philippine Islands, derived from the King Philip II of Spain in the 16th century.
...
Due to the colonial origin and direct meaning of the country's current name, proposals for name change have surfaced since the late 19th century up to present time. Among the proposed names that have surfaced include Sovereign Tagalog Nation (Haring Bayang Katagalugan)[6][7], Katipunan (Assembly/Gathering)[8], Kapatiran (Brotherhood)[8], Luzviminda (Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao)[9], Luzvimindas (Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, and eastern Sabah)[9], Mahárlika (Nobility)[8], Rizalia[8], Rizaline Republic (República Rizalina)[10], and Dayaw Republic (Repúblikang Dayaw).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_the_Philippines

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Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sighted New Zealand in 1642 and named it Staten Land "in honour of the States General" (Dutch parliament). He wrote, "itis possible that this land joins to the Staten Land but it is uncertain",[10] referring to a landmass of the same name at the southerntip of South America, discovered by Jacob Le Maire in 1616.[11][12] In 1645, Dutch cartographers renamed the land Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland.[13][14] British explorer James Cook subsequently anglicised the name to New Zealand.[15]

Aotearoa (pronounced /ˌaʊtɛəˈroʊ.ə/; often translated as "land of the long whitecloud")[16] is the current Māori name for New Zealand.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand#Etymology

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The English term Guinea comes directly from the Portuguese word Guiné, which emerged in the mid-15th century to refer to the lands inhabited bythe Guineus, a generic term used by the Portuguese to refer to the 'black' African peoples living south of the Senegal River (in contrast to the 'tawny' Sanhaja Berbers, north of it, whom they called Azenegues). The term "Guinea" is extensively used in the 1453 chronicle of Gomes Eanes de Zurara.[1] King John II of Portugal took up the title of Senhor da Guiné (Lord of Guinea) from 1483.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinea_(region)#Etymology (this also applies to Equatorial Guinea and Guinea-Bissau)

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When the Portuguese and Spanish explorers arrived in the island via the Spice Islands, they also referred to the island as Papua.[2] However, the name New Guinea was later used by Westerners starting with the Spanish explorer Yñigo Ortiz de Retez in 1545, referring to the similarities of the indigenous people's appearance with the natives of the Guinea region of Africa.[2] The name is one of several toponyms sharing similar etymologies, ultimately meaning "land of the blacks" or similar meanings, in reference to the dark skin of the inhabitants.

The Dutch, who arrived later under Jacob Le Maire and Willem Schouten, called it Schouten island, but later this name was used only to refer toislands off the north coast of Papua proper, the Schouten Islands or Biak Island. When the Dutch colonized it as part of Netherlands East Indies, they called it Nieuw Guinea.[2]

The name Irian was used in the Indonesian language to refer to the island and Indonesian province, as "Irian Jaya Province". The name was promoted in 1945 by Marcus Kaisiepo,[1] brother of the future governor Frans Kaisiepo. It istaken from the Biak language of Biak Island, and means "to rise", or "rising spirit". Irian is the name used in the Biak language and other languages such as Serui, Merauke and Waropen.[2]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Guinea#Names

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kL0XLUUSb5Y

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In 1920, Ernest Francois Eugene Douwes Dekker (1879–1950), who was also known as Setiabudi, introduced a new name for this proposed independent country (successor state of colonial Dutch East Indies) — which unlike its currently used name of "Indonesia" — did not contain any words etymologically inherited from the name of India or the Indies.[7] The new proposed name was the locally developed name Nusantara. This is the first instance of the term Nusantara appearing after it had been writteninto Pararaton manuscript.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nusantara#The_first_appearance_of_Nusantara_concept_in_the_20th_century

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In 1568, the Spanish navigator Álvaro de Mendaña was the first European tovisit the Solomon Islands archipelago, naming it Islas Salomón ("Solomon Islands") after the wealthy biblical King Solomon.[4] It is said that they were given this name in the mistaken assumption that they contained great riches,[6] and he believed them to be the Bible-mentioned city of Ophir.[7]

During most of the period of British rule the territory was officially named "the British Solomon Islands Protectorate".[8] On 22 June 1975 the territory was renamed "theSolomon Islands".[8] When Solomon Islands became independent in 1978, the name was changed to "Solomon Islands".

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_Islands#Name

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The island appears with a Portuguese name Cirne on early Portuguese maps, probably from the name of a ship in the 1507 expedition. Another Portuguese sailor, Dom Pedro Mascarenhas, gave the name Mascarenes to the Archipelago.

In 1598, a Dutch squadron under Admiral Wybrand van Warwyck landed at Grand Port and named the island Mauritius, in honour of Prince Maurice van Nassau, stadholder of the Dutch Republic.Later the island became a French colony and was renamed Isle de France.On 3 December 1810, the French surrendered the island to Great Britain during the Napoleonic Wars. Under British rule, the island's name reverted to Mauritius

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius#Etymology

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Originally, Portuguese and French merchant-explorers in the 15th and 16th centuriesdivided the west coast of Africa, very roughly, into four "coasts" reflecting local economies. The coast that the French named the Côte d'Ivoire and the Portuguese named the Costa do Marfim—both, literally, mean "Coast of Ivory"—lay between what was known as the Guiné de Cabo Verde, so-called "Upper Guinea" at Cap-Vert, and Lower Guinea.[9][10] There was also a Pepper Coast, also known as the "Grain Coast", a "Gold Coast", and a "Slave Coast". Like those, the name "Ivory Coast" reflected the major trade that occurred on that particular stretch of the coast: the export of ivory.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivory_Coast#Names

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European contacts within Sierra Leone were among the first in West Africa in the15th century. In 1462, Portuguese explorer Pedro de Sintra mapped the hills surrounding what is now Freetown Harbour, naming the shaped formation Serra da Leoa or "Serra Leoa" (Portuguese for Lioness Mountains).[21] The Spanish rendering of this geographic formation is Sierra Leona, which later was adapted and, misspelled, became the country's current name.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_Leone#European_trading

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Gabon's name originates from gabão, Portuguese for "cloak", which is roughly the shape of the estuary of the Komo River by Libreville.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabon#Etymology

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Portuguese explorers reached the coast in the 15th century and named the area Rio dos Camarões (Shrimp River), which became Cameroon in English. Fulani soldiers founded the Adamawa Emirate in the north in the 19th century, and various ethnic groups of the west and northwest established powerfulchiefdoms and fondoms. Cameroon became a German colony in 1884 known asKamerun.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameroon

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For most of its history, up until independence, the country was known as Santo Domingo[36]—the name of its present capital and patron saint, Saint Dominic—andcontinued to be commonly known as such in English until the early 20th century.[37] The residents were called "Dominicans" (Dominicanos), whichis the adjective form of "Domingo", and the revolutionaries named theirnewly independent country "Dominican Republic" (República Dominicana).

Inthe national anthem of the Dominican Republic (himno nacional de la República Dominicana), the term "Dominicans" does not appear. The authorof its lyrics, Emilio Prud'Homme, consistently uses the poetic term "Quisqueyans" (Quisqueyanos). The word "Quisqueya" derives from a nativetongue of the Taino Indians and means "Mother of the lands" (Madre de las tierras). It is often used in songs as another name for the country.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominican_Republic#Names_and_etymology

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The name "Colombia" is derived from the last name of Christopher Columbus(Italian: Cristoforo Colombo, Spanish: Cristóbal Colón). It was conceived by the Venezuelan revolutionary Francisco de Miranda as a reference to all the New World, but especially to those portions under Spanish rule (by then from Mississippi river to Patagonia). The name waslater adopted by the Republic of Colombia of 1819, formed from the territories of the old Viceroyalty of New Granada (modern-day Colombia, Panama, Venezuela, Ecuador, and northwest Brazil).[18]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colombia#Etymology

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The Spanish expedition led by Alonso de Ojeda, sailing along the length of the northern coast of South America in 1499, gave the name Venezuela ("little Venice" in Spanish) to the Gulf of Venezuela — because of its imagined similarity to the Italian city.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_Venezuela

A few of the more subtle ones:

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In the early 17th century, the Dutch East India Company established a commercial post at Fort Zeelandia (modern-day Anping, Tainan) on a coastal sandbar called "Tayouan",[30] after their ethnonym for a nearby Taiwanese aboriginal tribe, possibly Taivoan people, written by the Dutch and Portuguese variously as Taiouwang, Tayowan, Teijoan, etc.[31] This name was also adopted into the Chinese vernacular (in particular, Hokkien, as Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tāi-oân/Tâi-oân) as the name of the sandbar and nearby area (Tainan). The modern word "Taiwan" is derived from this usage, which is seen in various forms (大員, 大圓, 大灣, 臺員, 臺圓 and 臺窩灣) in Chinese historical records. The area occupied by modern-day Tainan represented the first permanent settlement by both European colonists and Chinese immigrants. The settlement grew to be the island's most important trading centre and served as its capital until 1887. Use of the current Chinese name (臺灣) was formalized as early as 1684 with the establishment of Taiwan Prefecture. Through its rapid development the entire Formosan mainland eventually became known as "Taiwan".[32][33][34][35]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan#Etymology

(The only correct name is:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Tungning )

Then there is:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_African_Republic

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa

which need to be renamed because we need to discontinue the Eurocentric term "Africa" altogether. (Namibia was until 1990 known as "South-West Africa", therefore its name change sets a positive example that these other countries can follow.)

And of course the most obvious one of all that is so obvious it is sometimes forgotten:

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The name "Israel" (Hebrew: Yisraʾel, Isrāʾīl; Septuagint Greek: Ἰσραήλ Israēl; 'El(God) persists/rules', though after Hosea 12:4 often interpreted as "struggle with God")[60][61][62][63] in these phrases refers to the patriarch Jacob who, according to the Hebrew Bible,was given the name after he successfully wrestled with the angel of theLord.[64] Jacob's twelve sons became the ancestors of the Israelites, also known as the Twelve Tribes of Israel or Children of Israel.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel#Etymology

(The only correct name is:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_name_%22Palestine%22 )

Please add to this list as well as discuss existing items.

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How fitting that Colón has such a surname. (Colón is actually cognate with “Dove,” the bird, but never mind that.)

It would be tactical in propaganda to synonomize Colonial mindset with *Colónial*—referring to the mindset of Columbus as he “stumbled” across the Carribean.

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newsinfo.inquirer.net/1091675/duterte-stresses-desire-to-rename-philippines

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President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday reiterated his desire to change the name of the Philippines weeks after he said the late president Ferdinand Marcos was right in wanting to change the country’s name to “Maharlika.”

But Duterte said he had no particular name yet in mind.

“I want to change it in the future. No particular name yet but sure I would like to change the name of the Philippines because the Philippinesis named after King Philip,” he said in a speech during the groundbreaking ceremony of the Isabela City gymnasium in Basilan.

Do it! And make sure you rename the gymnasium (and the city the gymnasium is named after) while you are at it!

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citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/1990322/eff-wants-sa-renamed-azania-says-shivambu/

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Talking to JJ Tabane on Power FM, EFF deputy president Floyd Shivambu addressedthe issue of name changes in South Africa, saying he believed ‘South Africa’ had colonial connotations and should be changed to Azania.

“The name South Africa was an attempt to give direction to the colonial output. We must decide as a country to democratically change the name ofthe country to Azania,” he said.

Shivambu’s view seems to be in line with that of PAC general secretary Narius Moloto, who called for SAto be renamed Azania in June 2017.

“Azania is the original name of the Southern tip of Africa, and the research by Professor Es’kiah Mphahlele clearly reveals that the real name of South Africa is actuallyAzania,” he told Talk Radio 702 at the time.

According to Moloto: “The name Azania is derived from the term Azanj, which is Arabic.”

“It has its own historic referral rather than geographical. This country did not have a real name, rather a geographical name,” he continued.

Shivambu said the EFF also wanted to rename anything in South Africa that was still named after apartheid leaders.

“The names of so many things in SA after racist apartheid leaders is one that definitely should be addressed, and we are working on that,” he said.

Nice! Azania it is!

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90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2020, 02:04:33 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

Rename the bases!

www.nytimes.com/2020/05/23/opinion/sunday/army-base-names-confederacy-racism.html

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Why Does the U.S. Military Celebrate White Supremacy?

It is time to rename bases for American heroes — not racist traitors.
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The white supremacist who murdered nine black churchgoers in Charleston, S.C., five years ago dispensed with the fiction that the Confederate battle flag was an innocuous symbol of “Southern pride.” A murderer’s manifesto describing the killings as the start of a race war — combined with photos of the killer brandishing a pistol and a rebel flag — made it impossible to ignore the connection between Confederate ideology and ablood-drenched tradition of racial terrorism that dates back to the mid-19th century in the American South.
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This same toxic legacy clings to the 10 United States military installations across the South that were named for Confederate Army officersduring the first half of the 20th century. Apologists often describe the names as a necessary gesture of reconciliation in the wake of the Civil War. In truth, the namings reflect a federal embrace of white supremacy that found its most poisonous expression in military installations where black servicemen were deliberately placed under the command of white Southerners — who were said to better “understand” Negroes — and confined to substandard housing, segregated transportationsystems and even “colored only” seating in movie houses.

As the official Defense Department history of this period now acknowledges, thefederal embrace of the Jim Crow system undermined the country’s readiness for war and destroyed morale, introducing black recruits to a brand of hard-core racism many had not experienced in civilian life. As the military opened more and more such bases across the country, the history notes, it “actually spread federally sponsored segregation into areas where it had never before existed with the force of law.” In otherwords, the base names were part of a broad federal sellout to white supremacy that poisoned the whole of the United States.

Celebrating a War Criminal

The officials who named a military base in Virginia for a profoundly dishonorable Confederate general, George Pickett, must have been willfully blind to a voluminous record demonstrating his unworthiness. In addition to being accused of cowardice at the pivotal battle at Gettysburg, the incompetent, self-regarding Pickett faced a war crimes investigation for the executions of 22 Union soldiers at Kinston, N.C., near the end of the war. When a Union general reminded Pickett that federal policy mandated retaliation for extralegal killings of Union soldiers, the Confederate general responded by crowing about the killings and threatening to hang 10 U.S. Army prisoners for every Confederate prisoner who might be marched to the gallows.

A military panel investigating the Kinston killings wrote unsparingly of Pickett’s command: “It is the opinion of board,” the panel wrote, “thesemen have violated the rules of war and every principle of humanity, andare guilty of crimes too heinous to be excused by the Government of theUnited States.” Pickett fled to Canada to avoid possible prosecution. He might well have been hauled back in manacles had the U.S. Army commander, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, not short-circuited the investigation.As the journalist and Civil War historian Gerard A. Patterson writes, Grant’s decision to save Pickett, with whom he had served in the Mexican-American war, was a classic act of old-boy cronyism. Even if Pickett’s crimes were set aside, his ineptitude in combat should have ruled him out of consideration when federal authorities were naming military installations.

By the time the federal government soughtout military training facilities in the South in preparation for war abroad, the school of mythology known as the Lost Cause movement — forged by groups like The United Daughters of the Confederacy — had rewritten Civil War history. This telling valorized the Ku Klux Klan; cast even the most execrable Confederate officers as saints; and portrayed slavery as an idyll featuring loving masters who doted on happy black retainers.

The Lost Cause era also ushered in a reignof racial terror during which African-Americans were stripped of basic rights and murdered in public for reasons such as competing with whites in business, seeking the vote or even failing to give way on the sidewalk.
...
The federal government embraced pillars of the whitesupremacist movement when it named military bases in the South. Consider, for example, Fort Benning, Ga., which honors a Confederate general, Henry Lewis Benning, who devoted himself to the premise that African-Americans were not really human and could never be trusted with full citizenship.

Benning was widely influential in Southern politics and served on the Supreme Court of Georgia before turning his attentions to the cause of secession. In a now famous speech in 1861, hetold secession conventioneers in Virginia that his native state of Georgia had left the union for one reason — to “prevent the abolition ofher slavery.” Benning’s statements strongly resemble that of present-day white supremacists — and reference the race war theme put forward by the young racist who murdered nine African-Americans in Charleston five years ago.

Benning warned, for example, that the abolition of slavery would one day lead to the horror of “black governors, black legislatures, black juries, black everything.” This, heopined, would place white womanhood at the mercy of African-Americans with the same rights as white people. “We will be completely exterminated,” he said, “and the land will be left in the possession of the blacks, and then it will go back into a wilderness.”

By naming yet another Georgia base for a Confederate general, John Brown Gordon, the federal government venerated a man who was a leader of the Georgia Ku Klux Klan after the Civil War and who may have taken on a broader role in the terrorist organization when its first national leader — a former Confederate general, Nathan Bedford Forrest — suffereddeclining health. As a politician, Gordon championed the late-19th-century campaign that stripped African-American Southerners ofthe citizenship rights they had briefly held during the period just after the Civil War known as Reconstruction.

Among the other Confederate officers honored at Southern military bases are merely undistinguished or flatly incompetent commanders like the irascible Gen.Braxton Bragg — “the most hated man of the Confederacy,” one biographercalls him. Bragg was known for pettiness and cruelty, along with the battlefield failures that eventually led to his being relieved of command.

A Deal With White Supremacy

The Charleston dead were scarcely cold when an Army spokesman declared that there was no need to expunge Confederate base names because the names were merely “historic’’ and “represent individuals, not causes or ideologies.”

The first problem with this argument is that, as individuals, these men were traitors. These rebel officers, who were willing to destroy the United States to keep black people in chains, are synonymous with the racist ideology that drove them to treason.

The second difficultyis that the base names were agreed upon as part of broader accommodation in which the military embraced stringent segregation so asnot to offend Southerners by treating African-Americans as equals. The names represent not only oppression before and during the Civil War, butalso state-sponsored bigotry after it.

Black recruits who volunteered to die for their country were mainly shut out of combat units, commanded by white Southerners who often resented being assigned to colored units. In some contexts, black servicemen were treated worse than prisoners of war. The actress and singer Lena Horne, for example, flew into a rage during World War II when she arrived at a military campto entertain only to find that the best seats — in the “white” section of the audience — had been reserved for German P.O.W.s.

The racist conventions applied on Southern military bases were exported to bases in the North and West as well. When commanders sought to police the leisure time conduct of black soldiers, those conventions spilled over into surrounding towns that had never known Jim Crow. At the heightof World War II, for example, Southern white officers at a base not farfrom Philadelphia reacted in vintage Deep South style when they saw black soldiers dating white women. One officer decreed that “any association between the colored soldiers and white women, whether voluntary or not, would be considered ****” — an offense that had long been subject to the death penalty under military law.

The Army surgeon general blew a kiss to racists in 1941 when he justified the RedCross policy of segregating the wartime blood bank by donor race — eventhough there was no scientific reason for doing so. The point was to assure white recipients that they would receive only “white” plasma. African-American newspapers quickly pointed out that a black doctor, Dr.Charles Drew, who directed the first Red Cross blood bank, had pioneered the techniques that made large-scale blood plasma storage possible.
...
Military installations that celebrate white supremacist traitors have loomed steadily larger in the civic landscape since the country began closing smaller bases and consolidating its forces on larger ones. Bases named for men who sought to destroy the Union in the name of racial injustice are an insult to the ideals servicemen and women are sworn to uphold — and an embarrassing artifact of the time when the military itself embraced anti-American values. It is long past time for those bases to be renamed.

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https://www.instagram.com/p/CBEN2Y9nIp3/?utm_source=ig_embed

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBDwhB0lzZU/?utm_source=ig_embed

Maybe one day we will have a "WESTERN CIVILIZATION MUST DIE PLAZA"?

Thank you Mayor Bowser! She is also a sanctuary city trailblazer:

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www.modernghana.com/news/1009117/wake-up-africa-rename-victoria-falls-and-lake.html

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Fellow Africans and friends of Africa liberation starts by "Decolonizing The Mind," to borrow the title of a must-read book by Ngugi wa Thiong'o the Kenyan intellectual and author.

Africans why do we in the 21st century still have a “Lake Victoria” in Uganda and a “Victoria Falls” in Zimbabwe?

These are just two of the many African wonders that need to be renamed or restored to their original ones.

Yes! And on top of all this, stop using the terms "Africa" and "African", which themselves are Western concepts! Group people and territories by language, or by river basin, or by ancient empire, or by present-day country instead! This was how we used to do it before colonialism. Let'sget back to it.

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A parallel campaign must be the recovery of Africa's artifacts--which is an ongoing campaign--now housed or displayed in the world's leading museums.

I agree. We cover this also.

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How can Africans talk of Pan-African unity without first reclaiming Africa’s past? Do you see a lake Samori Ture in France or a Mount Nehanda in Britain? These were iconic resisters of European imperialism in the 19th century.

Do not talk of "pan-African" unity! Talk of unity among all formerly colonized peoples instead! Stop letting Westerners divide us according to how they see us!

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Last year, in April, while visiting London I posed for a photo in front of ariver the natives call "Thames." I posted the photo on my Facebook pageand declared I’d renamed that body of water "Gulu River," after my great ancestral hometown in Uganda.

The post got hundreds of "likes.” Someone tweeted it and it has since been retweeted several thousands of times. It also became a “story” when The Wire , The Daily Nation , Nairobinews and other outletes wrote about it. The BBC also carried an item under the headline “Ugandan ‘explorer renames London river.’” Thereafter, Africans started posing in front of monuments and rivers throughout Europe and renaming them after African icons.

Iimagine people liked my “discovery” because they felt I was giving the British a title ”taste of their own medicine." After the global Covid-19lockdowns end, I plan to resume my exploration so I can discover and rename more landmarks in Europe and here in the United States.

Nice for trolling, but be careful not to start taking it too seriously. We are better than the Western colonialists.

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But I want us to also start reclaiming Africa’s natural wonders which were arrogantly renamed by European so-called explorers. They were taken by African guides to "discover,” lakes, rivers, and mountains they then renamed (including Lake Victoria). Even though Africans naively assistedthem, they wrote terrible things about the Africans once they returned to Europe, as I document in my book " The Hearts of Darkness How White Writers Created The Racist Image of Africa," (third edition coming soon).

Samuel Baker, the British imperialist wrote in "Albert Nyanza," his 1866 book: "I wish the black sympathisers in England could see Africa’s inmost heart as I do, much of their sympathy would subside... Human nature viewed in its crude state as pictured amongst African savages is quite on a level with that of the brute, and not to be compared with the noble character of the dog. There is neither gratitude, pity, love, nor self-denial; no idea of duty; no religion; but covetousness, ingratitude, selfishness, and cruelty. All are thieves, idle, envious, and ready to plunder and enslave their weaker neighbours.”

Yet today in the 21st century, there's a secondary school named after Samuel Baker in Uganda, and a few years ago alumni raised money for his statue which stands on the school's campus. So evenin death, Baker still mocks the so-called "natives."

There are many African heroes and sheroes who deserve the honorific given to QueenVictoria, including: Kwame Nkrumah, Nelson Mandela, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, Thomas Sankara, Samora Machel, Steve Biko, Robert Sobukwe, Kenneth Kaunda, Winnie Mandela, Nehanda, Yaa Asantewaa, Nzingah, and many others.

Nehanda was an anti-colonial resistanceleader executed, at the age of 58 by the British in Zimbabwe during Queen Victoria’s era. She was then beheaded and he skull shipped off to England. Don’t you think the spectacular falls deserves to bear her nameinstead of that of Victoria whose imperial agents killed her?
...
Start a campaign to honor African icons in your country.

This is the time to reclaim Africa!

Except,I repeat, it was the same Western colonialists who introduced you to the concept of "Africa", a term which was never used locally in pre-colonial times south of Roman Libya. If you are serious about reclamation, begin by discarding this Western term!

(The fact that I have to point this out to a self-proclaimed decolonizer just shows how deep the colonization is.....)

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This is good too:

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8460719/House-Democrats-vote-make-Washington-D-C-state-renaming-Douglass-Commonwealth.html

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Washingtonthe ‘District of Columbia’ would be no longer, the bill’s language says, as the new state would be referred to as ‘Washington, Douglass Commonwealth’ – swapping out Italian explorer Christopher Columbus for Maryland-born abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

On the practical side:

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Republicans have been averse to giving the city of 706,000 Americans statehood because it would mean giving Holmes Norton, a Democrat, a vote and then there would be two new senators.

In 2016, about 91 per cent of D.C.’s voters selected Democrat Hillary Clinton for president, while just 4 per cent chose President Trump.

With the current demographic makeup of the city, there’d be practically no chance for a Republican senator to be elected from the new Washington, Douglass Commonwealth.
...
Bowser made that point at a press conference in mid-June explaining that with state-hood D.C. could refuse National Guard members from other states coming into the city without local official’s consent.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2020, 02:17:55 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2020, 02:18:21 am »
https://www.fox8live.com/2020/06/29/mayor-cantrell-creates-street-renaming-commission/

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NEW ORLEANS, La. (WVUE) -Mayor Latoya Cantrell says she plans to name two people to the city’s Street Renaming Commission which will aim to get rid of parks, streets, and monuments that celebrate white supremacists.
...
The renaming commission was officially formed just two weeks ago, but Jefferson Davis Parkway is already in the process of being changed and will soon be named after former Xavier University president Norman C. Francis.
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The Commission will serve for a full calendar year with the responsibility for making the following recommendations:

    A list of streets, parks, and places that should be renamed, accompanied by a detailed explanation.
    A proposed list of replacement names for each recommended street, park, or place, accompanied by a detailed explanation.
    A process to facilitate both educating residents and receiving public feedback on the proposed changes.

https://www.facebook.com/LaToyaForNOLA/posts/4194410810598870
« Last Edit: July 01, 2020, 02:24:25 am by 90sRetroFan »

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2020, 03:50:00 am »
This was from 2018:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvcE1-r1Qjo

Two years later, victory:

https://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2020/7/13/21322508/washington-nfl-football-team-nickname-change

Every bit of activism makes a difference.

What have you, the reader, done to help kill Western civilization?

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2020, 11:14:41 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/gop-congressmen-introduce-resolution-change-171935204.html

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A group of Republican House members introduced a resolution Thursday that would effectively ban the Democratic Party from the House or force a party name change over past slavery ties.

I see this as an opportunity for a Blue name change. Being called something other than "Democratic" will make things more convenient when we eventually promote autocracy. The truth is that the name "Democratic" is un-American, since democracy was never independently developed in the New World.

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2020, 11:35:14 pm »
https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur

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In 1851, John P. McCown, an amateur ornithologist and army officer stationed in Texas, shot a group of larks on the prairie. Examining his kills, he noted two examples of a bird he’d never seen before: pale gray longspurs with a small spot of chestnut on the wings and prominent white patches in the tail. After preparing the specimens, he sent it off to an ornithologist friend, who gave it the name McCown’s Longspur.

At the time, this was typical for species discovery and naming. In the 1800s, European explorers were rapidly documenting and naming animals new to them. As amateur and professional collectors like McCown pushed west into Indian lands, they often mailed bird specimens to researchers back east. Sometimes, ornithologists honored colleagues by tagging their names to new species, or named them after patrons or relatives. Today, 142 North American English common bird names are honorifics.

But McCown’s case stands out for one significant reason: Ten years after shooting the longspur, he joined the Confederate States Army, where he was ultimately promoted to Major General and commanded multiple armies by the end of the war. He is the only member of the Confederate armies whose name is borne by a bird.

Now, as American culture is embroiled in a reckoning with monuments to white supremacy—and when the birding world is itself confronting its own past and present racism—the McCown’s Longspur has become a central point of tension in a much larger debate about honorific bird names, colonialism, and racism. On social media, scientific listservs, and in petitions, many birders are arguing that honoring McCown enshrines the ideas he stood for when he fought for the right to enslave people and went to war against native tribes.

Confederacy aside, what does it say about a civilization that sees no problem with naming birds after the first humans who shot them?? Answer: it is Western. This story really succinctly captures how Western civilization interacts with everything it comes into contact with. The initiated violence, the utter lack of respect, the reflexive hubris, all in one package.

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Name changes aren’t uncommon in the bird world. The NACC annually updates common names—the names birds are colloquially called, as opposed to their formal scientific names—to reflect new scientific analyses or grammatical changes. But it has historically proven resistant to changing bird names on the grounds of cultural sensitivity. In a proposal filed in 2000 to change the name of an Arctic duck from the anti-Indigenous slur “Oldsquaw” to the European name Long-tailed Duck, the committee agreed to change the name for reasons of consistency but explicitly ruled out doing so for “political correctness.” Another proposal in 2011 to rename a Hawaiian species known as the Maui Parrotbill—which is not, as the proposal pointed out, a member of the parrotbill family—in favor of a newly invented name, Kiwikiu, which used Hawaiian symbols, was met with considerable venom. “It seems contrived, unfamiliar, unpronounceable, and lacks a long history of usage,” opined one member of the board, while another wrote: “For no other region in the world have what are the equivalent of local colloquial names been widely incorporated into standardized English names. Enough is enough.”

What do you expect from a Western institution?

And here is a False Leftist on the issue:

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Should any birds be named after people? Some birders, like Nick Lund, didn’t want to end the honorific process altogether. “It’s fun to honor people, and add a sense of history,” he wrote at The Birdist, while stressing that offensive names should be changed. “If there's a bird named after some guy and it turns out that guy was a huge racist jerk, change the name!”

Lund may be against racism, but he is still a Westerner because he thinks it is "fun" to name non-humans after humans. A True Leftist, on the other hand, is effortlessly aware that it is disrespectful.

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Birders like Philadelphia’s Tony Croasdale have created lists of revised names, redubbing animals like Rivoli’s Hummingbird to Majestic Hummingbird or Harris’s Hawk to Pack-hunting Hawk.

https://www.wildlifeobservernetwork.com/blog/renaming-the-birds-of-north-america
« Last Edit: August 10, 2020, 11:48:42 pm by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2020, 11:23:35 pm »
https://www.nola.com/gambit/news/the_latest/article_dc1464e2-e2f8-11ea-9fce-7ba5e4be9be3.html

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'Jefferson Davis, your time is up': New Orleans street to be renamed for Black leader Norman Francis

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2020, 11:45:25 pm »
https://www.ed.ac.uk/news/students/2020/equality-diversity-and-inclusion-an-update

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From the start of the new academic year the David Hume Tower will be known as 40 George Square.

This is Hume:

https://medium.com/@christopherrichardwadedettling/david-hume-versus-the-negro-as-an-inferior-human-race-5430648f14fa

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There never was a civilized nation of any other complexion than white, nor even any individual eminent either in action or speculation. No ingenious manufacturer amongst them, no arts, no sciences. On the other hand, the most rude and barbarous of the Whites, such as the ancient German, the present Tartars, still have something eminent about them

Further reading:

https://www.abc.net.au/religion/peter-harrison-enlightened-racism/12341988

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These questions become more pressing when we consider that other Enlightenment figures held similar views. Voltaire, lauded today as a champion of reason and free speech, categorised the “Caffres, the Hottentots, the Topinambous” as “children.”
...
Another Enlightenment luminary, Immanuel Kant, expressed the view that full perfection of humanity was reserved for “the white race”; next came the “yellow Indians,” following by “the Negroes” and finally “the American peoples.” Americans he regarded as ineducable and lazy.

Even the generally inoffensive John Locke, well known as an advocate of religious toleration and liberalism, was not entirely blameless. He was an investor in the Royal Africa Company, an operation responsible for the transportation of tens of thousands of West Africans to the Americas.
...
Given all this, it is not surprising that more than one commentator has suggested that the scientific racism of the nineteenth century had its intellectual origins in the Enlightenment. But historical genealogies are complicated, racism clearly predated the Enlightenment, and many different historical factors inform the varieties of modern racism. We can still ask, however, whether the attitudes of these Enlightenment figures were simply background noise or were in some way integral to their thinking. If the latter, then we may need to view some prominent recent advocacies of a return to Enlightenment values with a degree of caution.

Many False Leftists make the mistake of appreciating "Enlightenment values".

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Two aspects of “Enlightenment thinking” around the race question bear closer attention: ideas of progress and religious scepticism. (Scare quotes are deployed here because I refer to popular conceptions of the Enlightenment, rather than the messy and multiple historical movements that might legitimately lay claim to that label.)

Commitment to progress, inflected by the racial understandings on display in Hume and others, meant that “inferior races” were either doomed to perpetual inferiority or extinction on account of supposed fixed and unchangeable deficiencies, or were seen as the child-like stages of the fully developed Western European type. Either way, the principle of progress meant that other races would be ranked in accordance with their degree of conformity to European societies that were imagined to epitomise human advancement.

The True Left is not bothered by such a description because we view children as superior. This is why we call ourselves the regressive left:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/leftists-against-progressivism/
« Last Edit: September 13, 2020, 12:04:56 am by 90sRetroFan »

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2020, 03:40:28 am »
Palestine is also a colonial name introduced by the Romans. What about Canaan?

As for the so-called Enlightenment, I'm with you on this one. Enlightnenment thinkers supported enlightened rational egoism, in fact they were predecessors to Ayn Rand.

Kant saw Native Americans as more primitive than Blacks? That's something new, normally racists see Blacks as the worst.

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2020, 12:11:43 am »
"Palestine is also a colonial name introduced by the Romans"

The Roman Empire was not a colonial empire, therefore we have no problem with Roman names continuing to be used.

In any case, "Palestine" comes from "Philistine" which predates the Roman Empire:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philistines#Etymology


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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2020, 12:21:56 am »
Small victories:

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/S-F-might-change-44-school-names-renouncing-15651679.php

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A third of San Francisco public schools could see their names changed as officials push to replace “inappropriate” ones honoring presidents, writers, generals and even Sen. Dianne Feinstein.
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The principal of Commodore Sloat, Fowzigiah Abdolcader, notified parents Wednesday of the need to come up with a new name, because John D. Sloat was a colonizer who “claimed/stole” California from Mexico, according to the committee.
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In a September meeting, panelist Mariposa Villaluna urged the committee to include Thomas Edison Elementary School on the list to change, saying he euthanized animals, including Topsy the elephant, according to a video of the meeting.
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El Dorado Elementary came up next for discussion, with board members questioning whether the criteria should apply to a mythological place associated with settlers or colonists.

“The concept of El Dorado, especially in California, had a lot to do with the search of gold, and for the indigenous people that meant the death of them,” said Mary Travis Allen during a September panel meeting. “I don’t think the concept of greed and lust for gold is a concept we want our children to be given.”
...
That work includes a recommendation to change the name of Dianne Feinstein Elementary, a name given by the Board of Education in 2006 when the new school opened.

The school made the list because, as mayor in 1986, Feinstein reportedly replaced a vandalized Confederate flag, one of several historic flags flying in front of City Hall at the time.

And of course:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dianne_Feinstein

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Feinstein was born Dianne Emiel Goldman[1] in San Francisco, to Betty (née Rosenburg), a former model, and Leon Goldman, a surgeon. Feinstein's paternal grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Poland. Her maternal grandparents, the Rosenburg family, were from Saint Petersburg, Russia.[9] While they were of German-Jewish ancestry,[10] they practiced the Russian Orthodox (Christian) faith

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The Voice of Black America?
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2020, 10:24:10 am »
The Voice of Black America?
Quote
How the white political establishment anointed Charlamagne tha God as the spokesman for all Black voters.
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2020/11/charlamagne-tha-god-white-political-establishment-breakfast-club.html?utm_source=pocket-newtab

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Charlemagne (English: /ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn, ˌʃɑːrləˈmeɪn/; French: [ʃaʁləmaɲ])[3] or Charles the Great[a][b (2 April 748[4][c] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles I, was the King of the Franks from 768, the King of the Lombards from 774, and the Emperor of the Romans from 800. During the Early Middle Ages, he united the majority of western and central Europe. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire around three centuries earlier.[5] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian Empire. He was later canonised by Antipope Paschal III.

Charlemagne was the eldest son of Pepin the Short and Bertrada of Laon, born before their canonical marriage.[6] He became king of the Franks in 768 following his father's death, initially as co-ruler with his brother Carloman I, until the latter’s death in 771.[7] As sole ruler, he continued his father's policy towards the papacy and became its protector, removing the Lombards from power in northern Italy and leading an incursion into Muslim Spain. He campaigned against the Saxons to his east, Christianising them upon penalty of death and leading to events such as the Massacre of Verden. He reached the height of his power in 800 when he was crowned "Emperor of the Romans" by Pope Leo III on Christmas Day at Old St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

Charlemagne has been called the "Father of Europe" (Pater Europae),[8] as he united most of Western Europe for the first time since the classical era of the Roman Empire and united parts of Europe that had never been under Frankish or Roman rule. His rule spurred the Carolingian Renaissance, a period of energetic cultural and intellectual activity within the Western Church. The Eastern Orthodox Church viewed Charlemagne less favourably due to his support of the filioque and the Pope's having preferred him as emperor over the Byzantine Empire's first female monarch, Irene of Athens. These and other disputes led to the eventual later split of Rome and Constantinople in the Great Schism of 1054.[9][d]

Charlemagne died in 814 and was laid to rest in Aachen Cathedral in his imperial capital city of Aachen. He married at least four times and had three legitimate sons who lived to adulthood, but only the youngest of them, Louis the Pious, survived to succeed him. He also had numerous illegitimate children with his concubines.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2020, 10:23:55 pm »
More small steps:

https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article247549410.html

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Nine Charlotte streets named after people with ties to the Confederacy, white supremacy, segregation or slavery should be renamed, a panel commissioned by the city recommended Wednesday.