Author Topic: Simple living movements  (Read 815 times)

guest55

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2021, 11:13:03 pm »
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Is life really just working a 40 hour work week to savor a precious weekend over and over again until you die?

I just turned 18, and from my understanding, being an adult means: working a meaningless and grueling job 5 days a week to have enough money to pay for livable accommodations, while having little to no time for relationships, hobbies, or really anything that makes life worth living.

Just started watching Undone on Netflix and the first episode is about the very same sentiments expressed in the quote from Zea-mays post.


guest55

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2021, 10:48:42 am »
Why Americans Are Quitting Jobs At Highest Rate in 20 Years
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A new report is showing that a surprising number of Americans quit their jobs in August.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VYiZ6Z9G3k

guest55

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2021, 04:10:49 pm »
Who can still afford to live in the city? | DW Documentary
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In cities around the world, housing prices are skyrocketing while incomes aren’t keeping pace. Housing is a human right that is becoming increasingly evasive. A market gone wild is putting the squeeze on tenants.

The documentary film sheds light on a new kind of faceless landlord, our increasingly unlivable cities and an escalating crisis that is impacting us all. This is not gentrification - it’s a different kind of monster.

Across the globe, rental prices in cities are skyrocketing and long-term tenants are being driven out of their apartments. The film follows Leilani Farha, UN Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing from 2014 to 2020, as she travels the globe, trying to understand who’s being pushed out of the city and why. Housing is a human right, a precondition to a safe and healthy life. But in a number of cities, having a place to live is becoming more and more difficult. Farha’s investigation leads her to a social housing project in the Swedish city of Uppsala, where several thousand apartments abruptly changed hands; to the trendy London district of Notting Hill, where many urban mansions are vacant; to Berlin, the German capital; and to Valparaíso in Chile. She also heads to the green hinterland of Seoul and the New York district of Harlem, where one tenant’s rent has been raised from 2,400 to 3,500 dollars from one day to the next for his 70-square-meter home. Besides interviewing desperate tenants, the journalist speaks with sociologist Saskia Sassen, economist and Nobel Prize laureate Joseph Stiglitz, and writer Roberto Saviano. They vividly explain how the transformation of the housing market into capital assets that are traded like stocks or commodities has culminated in a global social crisis within just a few years. "I believe there’s a huge difference between housing as a commodity and gold as a commodity. Gold is not a human right, housing is," says Leilani Farha. That is why she founded "The Shift," a global initiative that brings together advocates, mayors and NGOs, to counter the unbridled transformation of housing into financial assets.

#documentary #housing #dwdocumentary #freedocumentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPloUxLWfB8

Also related:
Suburbs that don't Suck - Streetcar Suburbs (Riverdale, Toronto)
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Car-dependent suburbs suck. But that doesn't mean that all suburbs suck. It is possible to build suburbs that don't suck, and the US and Canada used to design great suburbs all the time. But even though these pre-war suburbs are loved by many people, and in huge demand, they're illegal to build today.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWsGBRdK2N0

Zea_mays

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2022, 01:27:28 am »
There is now a Wikipedia article for Lying Flat. Not everyone in the party rejects the movement:

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However, there were official voices offering more empathic opinions on the tang ping phenomenon. Beijing's party-affiliated Guangming Daily newspaper added that tang ping should not be discounted without reflection—if China wants to cultivate diligence in the young generation, it should first try to improve their quality of life.[11] Huang Ping, a literature professor who researches youth culture at East China Normal University, told Sixth Tone that official media outlets may be concerned about the tang ping lifestyle because of its potential to threaten productivity, but "humans aren't merely tools for making things... when you can't catch up with society's development—say, skyrocketing home prices—tang ping is actually the most rational choice".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tang_ping


Related Sinosphere cultural phenomena:
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Buddha-like (Chinese: 佛系), or fo xi using its Chinese pronunciation,[1][2] is a buzzword used in China to describe young people who reject the rat race of the contemporary workaholic Chinese society in favour of a tranquil, apathetic life. The term is a neologism combination of two Chinese characters: "fó" (Chinese: 佛), meaning "Buddha"; and "xì" (Chinese: 系), meaning "series" or "school". Young people who uphold the Buddha-like mindset[3][4] are referred to as Buddha-like youths (Chinese: 佛系青年)[4] or Generation Zen.[5][6][7]

The term originated in a 2014 issue of the Japanese women's fashion magazine Non-no to refer to Japanese men who had progressed from being herbivore men to being monk-like men who consider it too exhausting to even bother interacting with women and enjoy being by themselves. The term has been also applied to numerous areas such as parenting, employment, online shopping, fandom, dating and interpersonal relationships. Although the word is inspired by the Buddhist doctrine of becoming spiritually satisfied through giving up anything tied to avarice, it is not a Buddhist principle.

The "Buddha-like" label is primarily adopted by young Chinese men from the post-90s and post-00s generations referring to their less-than-optimistic life outlook, although some post-80s experiencing quarter life crises also admit subscribing to the mindset. Stressed out by poor job prospects, decreased life satisfaction, increasingly stagnant social mobility, disappointing romantic life, familial complications of the one-child policy and soaring housing prices, youths have adopted the term to maintain their fortitude and as a backlash against society's high expectations. For example, the adherents of Buddha-like parenting would say that "there are not that many kids who will really amount to much, so why give them an exhausting childhood?"[1]
[...]
On 11 December 2017, a Chinese media company posted an article titled "The first group of post-90s generation who have become monks" (simplified Chinese: 第一批90后已经出家了; traditional Chinese: 第一批90後已經出家了) on its WeChat account Xin Shixiang (Chinese: 新世相), which had four million followers.[8][14][15] The essay, which discussed Buddha-like youth, went viral, in two days receiving over one million views on WeChat and 60 million on Sina Weibo.[15] It was the first time on Chinese platforms that the phrase "Buddha-like" became viral[16] and led to the neologism's broad adoption in Chinese society.[9] According to the scholar Jie Yang, the article was widely read by millions of viewers in China who connected with its message of living a Zen-like existence of being apathetic towards both wins and losses in life to confront the increased stress they feel from their community.[1]
[...]
The Buddha-like philosophy has been compared to the tang ping or "lie down" (Chinese: 躺平) philosophy an author introduced in 2021 in which the author had stopped working for two years and stopped caring about consumption.[23]
[...]
Whereas the diaosi and sang subcultures cast the blame for people's misfortune on extrinsic factors, the Buddha-like philosophy casts the blame inwards, bemoaning themselves for having physical and mental weaknesses and for being born in the wrong era.[17] The Buddha-like mindset is more biased to action and can be put more into practice in everyday life than the diaosi and sang subcultures.[17] The Buddha-like philosophy is to "don't fight, don't grab; let everything go" and urges tranquility and is a "sweet-hearted" mentality.[17] On the other hand, diaosi adherents have an "unwilling" mentality while sang followers have a dispirited mentality.[17] Buddha-like youth reject consumerism by saying, "I have the right not to consume, I have the right not to follow the logic led by consumerism, and I have the right not to pursue the materialism advocated by consumerism."[17] It is a progression from the diaosi subculture that covets the materialism of the wealthy and the sang subculture that finds passing pleasure in purchasing goods.[17]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddha-like_mindset


While the emerging Chinese counterculture has given youths idealistic new outlooks on life to save their souls from Western-style consumerism, other Sinosphere nations (and the US with its Antiwork movement) still remain in a state of paralyzed depression:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satori_generation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbivore_men
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikikomori

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampo_generation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N-po_generation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_Joseon


China needs to capitalize on its cultural power and start exporting its counterculture. The Cold War was not ended due to sheer military or economic might alone. It was as much of a battle of ideology, culture, and soul. Youths throughout the world are longing for idealism and hope just as they started to do in the 1950s-60s, and this time around the new counterculture has started to emerge in China.

Zea_mays

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2022, 09:12:30 pm »
More hunter-gatherer idolization from the Antiwork crowd. (They reposted these images. I don't know what the Twitter user's political views are):







https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FPgSoskXEAUCvYY?format=jpg&name=small
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Here are the data for two Machiguenga communities in Peru, collected in '72-'73 (left) and '86-'87 (right). The Machiguenga combined small-scale horticulture with foraging. Again, "doing nothing" leads the pack, either as number one or in the top 3.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FPgSvPGWYAQ-88G?format=png&name=small
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"Doing nothing" didn't always win. For the Madurese (Indonesia), it ranked 12th, perhaps reflecting the tiresome lives of more full-time agriculturalists. Still, across 8 diverse communities "doing nothing" came in 4th behind agri work, learning/teaching, & socializing (see plot)

3 of the top 4 activities in this culture are social activities (i.e. an agricultural society is conducive to socialism). However, this culture isn't fully agricultural since hunting ranks as the 5th most common activity...

Full Twitter thread:
https://twitter.com/mnvrsngh/status/1510978995269029888

And a recent paper where he got the data from:
https://www.pnas.org/doi/pdf/10.1073/pnas.1906196116


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Communism with Neolithic characteristics
https://old.reddit.com/r/antiwork/comments/twamvj/the_protestant_work_ethic_is_stupid/i3egwqb/

...Sigh. Maybe one day they'll learn what the Neolithic is.

I do like the idea of "Socialism with Neolithic characteristics" though:
https://trueleft.createaforum.com/ancient-world/ancient-candidates-for-socialism/

As we've already seen, farmers had plenty of time to lie flat during the non-harvest season:
https://trueleft.createaforum.com/issues/simple-living-movements/msg8554/#msg8554

Zea_mays

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2022, 01:29:32 pm »
Elon Musk comes out against the Lying Flat movement:
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“I think there will be some very strong companies coming out of China, there is just a lot of supertalented hardworking people in China who strongly believe in manufacturing,” he added.

“They won’t just be burning the midnight oil, they will be burning the 3am oil, they won’t even leave the factory type of thing, whereas in America people are trying to avoid going to work at all.”
https://finance.yahoo.com/finance/news/elon-musk-tesla-boss-praises-182248534.html

People are starting to understand Musk:
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It's in the bloodline, with his dad and all.


Meanwhile, Sinophobic liberals still don't get it:
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China sounds great - he should move there - now.

Response from people who aren't complete idiots:
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I wish. China regularly punishes its billionaires for doing **** like he does. He wouldn’t be as big a problem in China because the government probably would have forced him into hiding and made him donate half of his wealth by now.

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Can't wait till one of his tweets makes him "disappear" to a reeducation camp

I mean China doesn't care if you're a billionaire or not - they keep disappearing

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenniferwang/2021/01/07/disappearing-billionaires-jack-ma-and-other-chinese-moguls-who-have-mysteriously-dropped-off-the-radar/
He should move to China and see how far "iM jUsT a tRoLl" tweeting gets him


Combing the Lying Flat counterculture with the Chinese government's autocratic and populist enforcement of the law against corrupt billionaires seems to be exactly what the Western "Antiwork" crowd advocates for? But I guess even the smallest amount of Eurocentrism and democracy addiction is able to blind them to the fact that China is far closer to achieving an ideal society than any Western nation is capable of.

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Right?? That was my first thought. Chinese people are sick of this **** too. Tang ping / laying flat all day

guest55

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2022, 12:17:25 pm »
The rise of ‘bai lan’: why China’s frustrated youth are ready to ‘let it rot’
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Phrase bai lan gains popularity as severe competition and social expectations leave many young people despondent
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Early this month China’s president Xi Jinping encouraged the country’s youth to establish “great ideals” and incorporate their personal goals into the “bigger picture” of the Chinese nation and people. “‘China’s hope lies in youth,” he said in a major speech.

But on China’s internet, some young people say their WESTERN “ideals” simply cannot be achieved and many of them have given up on trying. Frustrated by the mounting uncertainties and lack of economic opportunities, they are resorting to a new buzzword – bai lan (摆烂, or let it rot in English) – to capture their attitude towards life.

The phrase, bai lan, which has its origin in NBA games, means a voluntary retreat from pursuing certain goals because one realises they are simply too difficult to achieve. In American basketball, it often refers to a player’s deliberate loss of a game in order to get a better draft pick.

On Weibo, the bai lan-related topics have generated hundreds of millions of reads and discussions since March. Netizens also created different variations of the bai lan attitude. “Properties in Shanghai too expensive? Fine, I’ll just rent all my life, as I can’t afford it if I only earn a monthly salary anyway,” one grumbled.

In recent days, this phrase – and more previously ‘tang ping’ (lying flat, 躺平), which means rejecting gruelling WESTERN competition for a low desire life – gained popularity as severe competition and high social expectations prompted many young Chinese to give up on hard work.

But bai lan has a more worrying layer in the way it is being used by young people in China: to actively embrace a deteriorating situation, rather than trying to turn it around. It is close to other Chinese phrases, for example ‘to smash a **** pot’ (破罐破摔) and ‘dead pigs are not afraid of boiling water’ (死猪不怕开水烫).

Or, if something's about to fall just push it and get it over with?  :)

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State media have taken note of this trend. “Why modern young Chinese like to ‘bai lan’?” one recent article in official media outlet asked. “In fact, this is as a result of negative auto suggestion, repeatedly telling oneself I cannot make it (in the Western worldview?)… And this kind of mentality often leads people to adopt the ‘bai lan’ attitude.”

Western civilization was never really designed to meet the needs and desires of non-Westerners?

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Prof Mary Gallagher, director of the Centre for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, says ‘bai lan’ is not necessarily a sentiment unique to China. “It is a bit like the ‘slacker’ generation in America in the 1990s. And like ‘tang ping’ last year, it is also a rejection against the ultra-WESTERN-competitiveness of today’s Chinese society.”
Entire article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/26/the-rise-of-bai-lan-why-chinas-frustrated-youth-are-ready-to-let-it-rot?utm_source=pocket-newtab

guest55

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2022, 01:37:58 pm »
Burnout: The truth about overwork and what we can do about it | DW Documentary
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Why do we work, and why are we working more than ever? Overwork is damaging our lives and the planet. This film takes a look at the past and also asks how we can change the future of work.

Why do we feel pressure to be busy, and where did this pressure come from? Some answers lie with the influences of the church, monarchies, 15th-16th Century colonialism and the effect of industrialization on modern-day consumerism and work ethics. Faced with the widespread problem of burnout, many modern companies respond with "mindfulness" in the workplace. Unions and the fight for labor justice are being replaced by therapies and office yoga. And yet, people who are unemployed are worse off than those with jobs — why?

Predictions that digitalization would make people’s work easier and that machines and artificial intelligence would replace us as workers don’t seem to add up. After all, the priority of automation is not to give people more freedom, but to make production more efficient and therefore increase profits.

So how can we free ourselves from the vicious cycle of overwork and consumerism, and learn to relax again?

#documentary #dwdocumentary #burnout
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q98aCklzCBE

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution
                https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/western-civilization-is-a-health-hazard/

BONUS:
Beats Antique - Rising Tide (feat. LYNX) [Blind Threshold]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7FI1ITX6Po

Lyrics:
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You're an island of a girl
Adrift in the world
With the Rising Tide
You know that the coming storm
Is gonna be a crazy ride
With you altars made of trash
The aftermath
Of disposable dreams
You know that you were born
For more than what machines provide

I will write you a song
That sounds like
A faded photograph
Of your favorite night
Just a little something
To remember me by
You can sing along
If you like it enough
Play it on your phonograph
It sounds kinda rough
Just a little something
To remember me by
You're an ocean of a girl
Surrounded a world
With the blackening tide
You know that the coming storm
Is gonna be a crazy ride
With your altars made of bones
The aftermath
Of disposable wings
You know were born
For more than what machines provide
Machines provide

I will write you a song
That sounds like
A faded photograph
Of your favorite night
Just a little something
To remember me by
You can sing along
If you like it enough
Play it on your phonograph
It sounds kinda rough
Just a little something
To remember me by
You can sing along
If you like it enough
Just a little something
To remember me by

90sRetroFan

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Re: Simple living movements
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2022, 06:55:59 pm »
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/young-chinese-love-frugal-living-113000576.html

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On Douban, a Chinese website that provides information related to current events, music, and more, young Chinese are flocking to groups that offer money-saving tips. One group, named “Crazy Money Savers,” which has over 600,000 subscribers, encourages members to shun takeout and bubble tea, and advises them to delete popular e-commerce apps like Alibaba and Pinduoduo.

In 2015, Chinese President Xi Jinping launched a new economic strategy emphasizing domestic consumption and production to shift the Chinese economy into its next stage of development. But in recent years, many young Chinese—like those who joined Douban’s “Crazy Money Savers”—have begun saving, scrimping, and turning to social media influencers for advice on how to live frugally, a lifestyle directly in conflict with the government’s ambitions.
...
Now, Beijing’s economic planners, who are resting their hopes on growing consumption to fuel China’s economy, are trying to reverse the newly frugal lifestyles of many young Chinese

This is the resurgent blood memory of pre-modern China vs Eurocentrist Xi's "New China". We of course support the former.

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In 2020, a clear trend began emerging across Chinese social media: the proliferation of so-called “low desire” and “low consumption” money-saving groups. Douban users created groups like “Stingy Men’s Federation” and “Stingy Women’s Federation.”

 :)

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The recent events shattered Vera’s confidence in the authorities and led her to question China’s economic future for the first time. “I always thought I’d want to stay in China and buy a home. Now I’m really not sure,” she said.
...
China’s youth unemployment rate soared to nearly 20% in July. The country’s general slowdown and government crackdown on tech has led to pay cuts and mass layoffs.

Emigrate ASAP! Pre-modern China will only be fully restored when the population falls to pre-modern numbers:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/issues/population-and-demographics/msg6837/#msg6837

Continuing:

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As young Chinese look to save money, the government is pushing them to spend more.
...
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said in a Wednesday speech that the government will do “whatever we can to expand effective investment and promote consumption” to deal with the weak demand.

The correct response to reduced demand is reducing labour (whether in the short-term by cutting working hours or in the long-term by reducing population), not promoting consumption.