Author Topic: Uniting Americans  (Read 3587 times)

90sRetroFan

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Uniting Americans
« on: July 02, 2020, 11:58:08 pm »
OLD CONTENT

I support the recent increase in tendency to call out racists as un-American:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBfgn7go-e4

(I of course also appreciate the reference at 3:51 to Poland and Hungary.)

The following is a nice approach too:

www.yahoo.com/huffpost/trump-confederate-president-reelection-232605303.html

Quote
Running For Reelection, Trump Talks Like He’s Running For President Of The Confederacy

---

We need more of this (just ignore the idiot at 2:57):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEMIwf4NGw8

---

A topic that should have been addressed a long time ago:

www.yahoo.com/news/officer-stood-george-floyd-died-224329297.html

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“People don't have a baseline of an understanding of what anti-blackness even is,” Vaj, who’s Hmong American, said. “Yes, we [Asian Americans] have pain and we suffer from oppression and discrimination and racism. Black people are in a different boat. On top of that, their struggle with the police, at least in this country, has a long history of 400 years of control and occupation. I think that that's really important for us to acknowledge that.”

Tensions between the black and the Asian communities have long existed. The strained relations stem, in part, from being set in opposition to one another throughout American history, Vaj said. One of the most glaring examples is the Los Angeles riots that followed the acquittal of four white police officers for use of excessive force in the videotaped beating of Rodney King, a black construction worker. Businesses sustained roughly $1 billion in damage, with roughly half being Korean-owned. Divisions between immigrant Korean business owners and their black customers widened.

The organizer, who comes from a refugee family herself, said she can look back to as recently as her own people’s journey in the U.S. as evidence. When America resettled Southeast Asian refugees following the Vietnam War, many were placed in poorly funded urban areas with little infrastructure, such as Long Beach and Stockton, California, or the Bronx, New York, where black and brown communities had already existed.

“When you are put into this situation, and you live amongst other poor black and brown folks with very little resources, there is that piece of strain between communities that must fight for the same resources,” Vaj said. “There isn't enough for all of you.”

Moreover, resettlement efforts did not include sufficient introductions between refugees and the communities they now inhabited, Vaj said. The information that was fed to the new immigrants often did not humanize communities of color, she added.

“Everything you've learned, you've learned through the lens of white supremacy. And this is what this country is built on,” Vaj explained. Even now, the organizer said she’s received abusive comments and criticisms from some members of her community for standing with the black community.

Ellen Wu, a historian and the author of “The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority,” overlapped many of Vaj’s thoughts. She noted white supremacy has historically fed on the exploitation and destruction of the black community.

As Asian Americans began to arrive in the United States, white supremacy targeted the group as well. The government passed racist legislation like the Chinese Exclusion Act, and fueled movements like the anti-Japanese movement of the early 1900s.

But Wu explained that as time went on, white supremacy took on other forms. Fearing that anti-Asian racism could jeopardize the U.S.’ place as a leader on the world stage and impede imperial expansion abroad, white liberals sought to dismantle Asian exclusion legislation and practices during and after World War II.

“In other words, they expected a geopolitical payoff to recognizing Asian Americans as ‘model citizens,’” Wu said.

In the 1960s, white liberals wielded the model minority stereotype to stifle black social movements, using Asian Americans as “proof” of meritocracy and equal opportunity for people of color. As she mentions in her book, politicians weaponized Japanese American “success stories” after World War II as a tactic in reframing Japanese American incarceration and weakening the civil rights movement. Compliance with, rather than opposition to, the state would bring rewards, the politicians hoped to show.

“The insinuation was that hard work along with unwavering faith in the government and liberal democracy as opposed to political protest were the keys to overcoming racial barriers as well as achieving full citizenship,” Wu wrote.

The evolving forms of white supremacy, Wu said, gave Asians more space for social mobility.

“These gains, however, have come at a cost: complicity with white supremacy.”

...
Wu also clarified that Asian Americans are a diverse group with subgroups that have a range of power and privilege. Since their initial resettlement roughly 45 years ago, Southeast Asians, including Hmong, have dealt with the pain of impoverished neighborhoods and inadequate support under the backdrop of existing racial injustice, Quyen Dinh, the executive director of Southeast Asia Resource Action Center, said.

This is another reason why you need to stop calling yourself "Asian", as I have long recommended. Or "black", for that matter. Or any other Western-invented category. The only category we need is the anti-category "non-white". WHICH DOES NOT INCLUDE JEWS.

Quote
“Let’s not forget that state violence in the United States has affected Asian Americans too,” Iyer said.

She pointed out that in 2006, a Minneapolis police officer Jason Andersen shot and killed a 19-year-old Hmong American Fong Lee who had been riding a bike with friends. An all-white jury ruled that Andersen, who claimed he saw Lee with a gun, did not use excessive force on the teen and exonerated him. A 57-year-old Indian grandfather, Sureshbhai Patel, was slammed to the ground and left partially paralyzed by Alabama officer Eric Parker during a visit to his son’s family.

“While incidences of police brutality against Asian Americans do not occur with the frequency they do against black people, we cannot deny that police brutality and discriminatory policing targets black and brown bodies at disproportionate and alarming rates,” Iyer said.

In addition to providing some historical perspective, Wu said Asian Americans can remind their own communities that many privileges they take part in came as a result of black movements.
...
There has been marked support from many Asian Americans for the black community during this time, many of the experts noted, particularly after tragedies such as Floyd’s death. Iyer noted that organizations, students and activists have created toolkits, campaigns and town halls to further solidarity practices between black and Asian communities. She also mentioned she’s seen examples of youth engaging in conversations between Asian small-business owners who operate convenience stores in black neighborhoods and black residents.

This is what we need more of, and more publicity for.

Quote
For Asian Americans to avoid the discussion on race would bring dangerous results, Lakshmi Sridaran, the executive director of South Asian Americans Leading Together, explained. Particularly as the community observes the rise in anti-Asian hate violence and racism amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they must interrogate their own reliance and trust in law enforcement. She noted that some communities look to the criminal justice system to mitigate hate.

“These complex relationships of distinct and shared struggles are informed both by interpersonal and state violence,” she explained. “If we recuse ourselves from these discussions, then we further entrench ourselves in white supremacy and continue to endanger other communities of color.

This is what I have been saying all along. And it's not just about having discussions. Eventually it will be about willingness to use firearms to protect one another.

---

www.wsj.com/articles/protests-spread-beyond-big-cities-from-raleigh-to-santa-rosa-11591099005
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“The nation has erupted,” said Kami Chavis, director of the criminal justice program at Wake Forest University School of Law, who called the outcry more intense than past protests. “What feels different to me about this time is that there’s so much solidarity across communities.”

Bethany Cannon, a 25-year-old student and bartender, organized protests that drew hundreds both Saturday and Sunday in Lubbock, Texas, a conservative city of 258,000 that is majority white and just 8% black. Ms. Cannon and others couldn’t recall another Lubbock protest with such crowds, but she called Mr. Floyd’s death a breaking point of too many police killings and too little change.
...
In El Paso, a Texas border city of 681,000 that is 81% Hispanic and less than 4% black, hundreds of people marched from a local park to police headquarters Sunday. Malik Dado, an Army reservist and activist of Asian and Hispanic descent, said that though El Paso is a long way from Minneapolis, the community understands racial injustice; a gunman accused of targeting Mexican-Americans killed 23 people in a Walmart there last year.

“It’s all of our fights, not as black or white or blue, but for the American people,” Mr. Dado said.

www.yahoo.com/news/teens-tiktok-exposing-generational-rift-141705669.html

Quote
Social media is awash with earnest shows of support for the Black Lives Matter movement. The best of these posts have been materially useful to the cause. Others, less so. But on TikTok, Gen Z is modeling the most important tenet of allyship: taking it upon yourself to research, point out, and confront racism, especially when it feels risky or uncomfortable to do so.

Fifteen-year-old Izabella, for example, documented her family's frustrating response to George Floyd's killing while in police custody, in a TikTok with more than 1.5 million views.

"I literally hate my family so much," Izabella said, eyes wet from crying. "It's just. They just tried to argue with me that George Floyd — like, they just tried to tell me that he deserved that 'cause he did something wrong, and that it was okay. That is not okay. And it's just making me so upset. I don't know. I do not wanna live here. I hate livin' in Louisiana. I hate livin' around these racist f-cks. Like, I just wanna leave."

In two days, her TikTok following went from roughly 50 to 17,000 people. After picking up traction on the platform, her video eventually landed on Twitter when culture critic Safy-Hallan Farah shared it.

"My sister sent me a TikTok of a white girl crying about her parents saying George Floyd deserved to die, tearfully disowning them," she wrote. "There's a whole genre of white gen z kids processing in real-time what's new information to them (but not us), that their parents are sociopaths."

Racism is psychopathy towards the outgroup. This is one of the simplest ways to explain what racism is.

Quote
Elaborating on the everyday racism she has observed in her community, which is located in the deep south, Izabella said she routinely hears white people "saying the n-word and making fun of black people."

"It makes me sick," she added.

On Monday, 16-year-old TikTokker Grace shared a tearful excerpt from a conversation with her father.

"Why can't I just speak my mind about it without anyone getting mad?" she asked her father in the clip, which was filmed using her front-facing camera.

"Because you won't stop," he replied. "And it's really, really, really annoying."

"Because I'm trying to say that black lives matter?" the teen asked, visibly upset.

"You said that, and now you're good," her father said. "You just keep talking about it and talking about it...We can choose not to listen because you've already said all of your points. And then you just keep going on and going on and going on. And it's ruining — it's just like, ruining the day."

To all anti-racists with racist parents, the best long-term thing that you can do is voluntarily refrain from reproducing.

---

www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/black-lives-matter-protests-near-me-small-towns

Quote
The movements and marches that convulse big cities don’t usually (or ever) make it to Havre. Nor do they usually make it to hundreds of other small towns across the country. But the protests following the death of George Floyd, who was killed in police custody on May 25, are different.

All over the country, people are showing up — often for the first time in their lives — to protest police brutality and injustice. In tiny ag towns like Havre and Hermiston, Oregon, but also in midsize cities Topeka, Kansas, and Waco, Texas; on island hamlets (Friday Harbor, San Juan Island; Nantucket, Massachusetts; Bar Harbor, Maine); and in well-to-do suburbs (Lake Forest Park, Washington; Darien, Connecticut; Chagrin Falls, Ohio). They are showing up at the courthouse. They are kneeling and observing eight minutes of silence — a reference to how long Floyd was pinned to the ground in a knee chokehold by the Minneapolis police officer who was later charged with his murder. They are marching down interstates and waving signs on street corners. Sometimes, like in the town of Alton, New Hampshire (population 5,335), where one woman organized a protest just two months after being hospitalized with COVID-19, only seven people come. Sometimes, like in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, there are thousands.

These protests are covered by local news outlets, but amid the deluge of national news — major protests in major cities, guard tanks and helicopters, tear gas and rubber bullets, looting and destruction in select cities, the president’s reaction, massive economic anxiety and unemployment, all against the backdrop of the continued spread of COVID-19 — it’s hard for these stories of smaller, even silent, protests to break through.
...
There have been protests in Belfast, Maine. In Farmington, New Mexico. In Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In Bentonville, Arkansas. In Lubbock, Texas. In Idaho Falls, Idaho. The biggest anyone can remember in Paducah, Kentucky, in Bozeman, Montana, in Pendleton, Oregon, in Frisco, Texas, and in Ogden, Utah. In Tacoma, Washington, pastors knelt in the rain, pleading with God. In Bowling Green, Kentucky, three rolling days of protests. In Owatonna, Minnesota, a student-led protest lasted for 10 hours. In Tulsa, Oklahoma, thousands gathered on the 99th anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre. In Myers Park, one of the wealthiest neighborhoods of Charlotte, North Carolina, where black people were prohibited from owning property for decades. And in Petal, Mississippi, where protesters have spent days calling for the resignation of Mayor Hal Marx, who tweeted last week that “If you can talk, you can breathe.”

These protests cut across demographics and geographic spaces. They’re happening in places with little in the way of a protest tradition, in places with majority white population and majority black, and at an unprecedented scale. People who’ve watched and participated in the Black Lives Matter movement since 2015 say that this time feels different. And the prevalence of these small protests is one of many reasons why.
...
Riverton, population 11,000, is surrounded by the Wind River Reservation in central Wyoming. Like a lot of towns that border Native American reservations — it can feel, as Steele put it, “old-fashioned.” But on Monday, more than 150 people showed up to protest. Some were from Riverton; others drove from the reservation and as far away as Lander. An older white woman had written “THIS WYOMING NATIVE KNOWS BLACK LIVES MATTER” on the back of her T-shirt.

In September 2019, a Riverton police officer shot and killed a Northern Arapaho man outside the local Walmart after he allegedly had attempted to stab the officer, giving new life to long-standing complaints about the mistreatment of tribal residents by off-reservation police. (Native Americans are killed by police at a higher rate than any other ethnic group in the United States.) In November, the city met with the Northern Arapaho tribal council to attempt to improve relations between the two. But as Layha Spoonhunter, who is Eastern Shoshone, Northern Arapaho, and Oglala Lakota, told me, there was significant skepticism and racism from people in town.

Spoonhunter decided to put together the event, along with Micah Lott, as a way to “bring to light issues that we experience as people of color,” he said. He said the overwhelming response from the city, where you still regularly see Confederate flags hung in windows and in trucks, was positive. “There were people who shouted, ‘Hope you get the ‘rona,” he said. “But most people honked in support, or raised their fist, or if we shouted ‘black lives matter’ or ‘justice for Floyd,’ they would open their windows and yell it back.”

“As Indigenous people, we wanted to stand in solidarity with Black Lives,” Lott told me. “We put it on in Riverton, because of its older white conservative population and its prejudice toward Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.”

mexiconewsdaily.com/news/demonstration-at-us-embassy-protests-against-police-violence/

Quote
About 300 people participated in a peaceful protest against police violence and racism in the United States Thursday night at a candlelight vigil in front of the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.

Dressed in black, wearing masks and holding candles, the assembled crowd of mostly young people paid tribute to George Floyd, the African-American man who was killed on May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, allegedly by a police officer.

U.S. citizens, Mexicans and other foreigners expressed their solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and added their voices to protests that have occurred in all 50 U.S. states and in major cities around the world.

“We are here to remember the black lives that have been killed by the police in the United States where racism is an integral part of its systems and institutions,” said one of those attending the vigil.

“Your fight is my fight #BlackLivesMatter,”
“Racism kills. I can’t breathe” and “Justice for George Floyd” read some of the signs hoisted by the crowd.
...
“Just like our oppressions, our struggles are also linked. The anti-racist struggle in the United States is the same as that of Mexico and other parts of the world, the struggle of indigenous peoples is the same as that of blacks,” Bailey added.

This is what I like to see.

Bonus:

metro.co.uk/2020/06/05/protesters-form-circle-around-muslims-can-pray-peacefully-12810202/

Quote
Muslims were able to pray safely during a Black Lives Matter protest in Brooklyn after hundreds of people formed a protective circle.

A moving video shows non-Muslims creating a human shield to keep Muslims out of potential harm from officers of the New York Police Department (NYPD), who have come under fire over their excessive use of force.

Stance Grounded, who tweeted the footage, said: ‘Non-Muslims surround Muslims so they can pray safely from the harm of the NYPD during a Black Lives Matter protest in Brooklyn, New York. I LOVE THIS. THIS IS HUMANITY!’ He added: ‘They were really prepared to get tear gassed, maced, shot w/ rubber bullets just so fellow humans could pray in peace. If that isn’t LOVE, I don’t know what is. If that isn’t HOPE, I don’t know what is’.
...
The video of Muslims being protected as they pray has been praised for showing people coming together in a show of solidarity against racism.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2021, 01:39:01 am by 90sRetroFan »

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90sRetroFan

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2020, 12:08:06 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

Inner change is also required:

www.yahoo.com/news/latinos-must-confront-ingrained-anti-110856016.html

Quote
Latinos must confront 'ingrained' anti-black racism amid George Floyd protests, some urge

Ana Sanz, 26, marched for about 10 miles with a sprained ankle on Monday in Washington, D.C., to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and to demand accountability for the dehumanization of black people at the hands of law enforcement.

But Sanz, an Afro-Latinx from Washington who works with women overcoming domestic and sexual violence, said it's also time for something else — for her fellow Latinos to confront the racism and anti-blackness within the community.

Proximity to "Eurocentricity and whiteness is how our ancestors survived" through oppression, a painful legacy that still prevails and needs to be eradicated
, Sanz said.

This is what I have been saying.

Quote
Jasmine Haywood, an Afro-Latina who has researched anti-black Latino racism, told NBC News that millennial Latinos like Sanz are looking to break cycles of internalized racism and the ways Latinos perpetuate and uphold white supremacy.

"What Latinos need to realize is that our oppression is bound up and intertwined with the oppression of the black community," Haywood said. "Until they are liberated, until they are free from injustices and oppression, we will never be liberated."

Haywood said anti-blackness sentiments are "ingrained in our cultures" in part because generations of Latinos were "taught to seek partners that have a certain European or white phenotype or lighter skin to lighten their family trees."
...
While Latinos largely acknowledge their ethnicity and African roots — dating to Latin America's colonial period, when mixing occurred among indigenous people, white Europeans, slaves from Africa and Asians — many still struggle to consider themselves as black. In Pew's survey, 39 percent of Afro-Latinos identified as white, while only 18 percent identified as black

Ultimately we need to discard all these terms (all of which were invented by Western civilization), but until then, we first need to reject belief in "white" superiority,
So long as you believe in "white" superiority, it is logically impossible to not also believe in "black" inferiority (or, for that matter, Jewish hypersuperiority). Western standards of superiority/inferiority must be discarded.

Quote
At the same time, Latinos of every color face overt and subtle racism and discrimination, whether they were born in the U.S. or not.
...
"White-passing Latinos really need to come to terms with their privilege in the context of anti-blackness," whether they were born in the U.S., Latin America or the Caribbean, and they "need to just accept the reality that we also come from a racist society that is embedded in white supremacy," Varela said.
...
Vilson said it is important to remember "how interconnected so many of our struggles are."

"The focus on anti-blackness does not mean that we don't care about kids in cages. Similarly, we understand that slavery also manifested in so many Asian Americans who had to build railroads in this country. We understand that the prison system was exponentially built on the backs of black people through the 13th Amendment," he added. "The more we can hone in on some of the worst offenses, we can find ways to alleviate all kinds of different aggressions and oppressions."

WESTERN CIVILIZATION MUST DIE!

---

us.yahoo.com/news/floyd-case-could-finally-unite-085701529.html

Quote
In the case of Floyd, the store in which he allegedly attempted to pass a counterfeit $20 bill is owned by a Muslim American of Palestinian heritage named Mahmoud Abumayyaleh.
...
it was a 17-year-old clerk who called the police, not Abumayyaleh, who was out of the store at time and who has stated he personally knew Floyd and would’ve never called the authorities if he had been present
...
On the more positive side though, the person who will lead the prosecution of the officers for killing Floyd is Muslim: Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, who announced Wednesday that he was upgrading the charges against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin from third- to second-degree murder and he charged the three officer at the scene with aiding and abetting in the murder.

Add to that, we’ve seen an “unprecedented outpouring of support from Middle Eastern and South Asian Muslims” for Floyd and in support of Black Lives Matter, according to Margari Hill, an African-American Muslim who serves as executive director of the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative, based in Alta Loma, California.

This second development has not always been the case. As longtime activist Linda Sarsour, co-founder of MPOWER Change, told me , “Since the 2014 police murder of Mike Brown in Ferguson, we have seen more non-black Muslim participation in the anti-police brutality movement because now we have begun to understand the intersections of oppression by law enforcement and that one-third of our Muslim community is African-American, and they are hurting too.” But she added, “We still have so much more work to do.”

That was the same sentiment I heard from Cleveland City Council member Basheer Jones, the first Muslim ever elected to the council with his 2017 victory. Jones, a 33-year-old African-American, is doing his best to bring together the diverse facets of the Muslim community. I’ve seen Jones give impassioned speeches to Muslim audiences that were primarily Arab and South Asian, telling them in essence, “I’m with you on Syria and Palestine, you have to be with us on Black Lives Matter.”

Jones, who is now actively considering a run for Cleveland mayor in 2021, explained that when he first ran for office three years ago, he received very little support from the greater Muslim community, but that has dramatically changed over time. Jones noted that one of the most effective tools in uniting and animating the disparate parts of the Muslim community is none other than Donald J. Trump: “It doesn’t matter if you are Middle Eastern, South Asian, or black, if you are not white, you suffer from the impact of white supremacy—which has grown even more acute in the time of Trump.”

In other words, Jews (by far the biggest beneficiaries of the Trump administration) must never under any circumstances be considered "non-white".

Quote
Jones, who was a community organizer before running for City Council, spoke of the long list of African-Americans wrongly killed by the police in Cleveland, including 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was shot and killed by a police officer in 2014 while playing with a pellet gun. But he noted the the Floyd case was especially heartbreaking and jarring: “Not only did we see the police with a knee on George Floyd’s throat for over eight minutes, the police knew they were being filmed and still didn’t care.”

In Minneapolis, where Floyd was murdered, the Muslim community has been especially active—not just participating in the protests but organizing them as well, explained Jaylani Hussein, the executive director of the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). Hussein, who is of Somali heritage, remarked that since the Muslim community in Minneapolis is primarily African American, they’ve been leading the protests. But he added that there has been a visible presence by the Palestinian American community, which he views as a very positive development.

Hussein, who was involved in protesting past police killings in Minneapolis such as of the case of Philando Castile, a black motorist killed by a police officer who was later acquitted, the Floyd case has animated the Muslim community unlike ever before. In Hussein’s view, the horrific killing of Floyd on video has “fully engaged” the Muslim community to stand up for black lives and oppose police brutality.

For more on BLM support for BDS:

https://www.timesofisrael.com/in-platform-black-lives-matter-accuses-israel-of-genocide-backs-bds/

---

www.yahoo.com/entertainment/george-lopez-says-latinx-celebrities-195853724.html

Quote
George Lopez has a message for Latinx celebrities who are choosing to stay silent during the George Floyd protests: stop.

"You see some comments that are like "How am I supposed to help black lives when they don't help us? That's the wrong attitude. You don't do something and expect something in return. You do it because it's right," the comedian tells EW.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CA-ewbWH-kP/?utm_source=ig_embed

https://www.instagram.com/p/CAQ19eAFUq8/?utm_source=ig_embed

---

www.yahoo.com/news/one-big-difference-george-floyd-140544805.html

Quote
“This is utterly different from anything we’ve seen,” said Douglas McAdam, a Stanford sociologist who studies social movements, referring to the recent protests. Since the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014, every highly publicized death of an African American man while in police custody brought protests, he said, “but overwhelmingly in the black community.”

The pattern evident in the streets has now been confirmed by early demographic data: Researchers fanned out across three American cities last weekend and found overwhelmingly young crowds with large numbers of white and highly educated people.
...
While opinion polls on race do not always capture what people actually think, surveys have shown that racial attitudes among white Americans have been shifting. There has been a sudden and sharp turn by white liberals toward a much more sympathetic view of black people in recent years, said Andrew Engelhardt, a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University, who has published papers documenting the shift.

“In the last 10 years or so we’ve seen something unprecedented with white Democrats,” Engelhardt said.
...
by 2018, white liberals felt more positively about blacks, Latinos and Asians than they did about whites.

They should also stop calling themselves "white" ASAP. The sooner the only people left calling themselves "white" are all rightists, the tidier the battlefield becomes.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2020, 12:12:12 am »
www.yahoo.com/news/muslims-join-demand-police-reforms-130012297.html

Quote
In the wake of George Floyd's death in police custody, dozens of American Muslim organizations have come together to call for reform to policing practices, and to support black-led organizations.

“The victimization of unarmed Black Muslims has a long and troubling history,” said a coalition statement signed by more than 90 civil rights, advocacy, community and faith organizations. “As American Muslims, we will draw on our diversity, our strength, and our resilience to demand these reforms because Black lives matter.”
...
Like members of other faith groups, many Muslims in America have joined in the outrage unleashed after Floyd, a black man, died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee to his neck. Groups from multiple denominations across faiths have publicly called for action against racism and aligned with the goals of peaceful demonstrators.

In street protests, statements, sermons and webinars, American Muslims have rallied against racism and discussed reforms.

“Muslim American organizations are committed to advocating at all levels to put an end to excessive use of force which has led to the murders of countless Black Americans,” said Iman Awad, legislative director of Emgage Action, one of the statement’s signatories. “Our message is that we will continue to fight but most importantly uplift the work being done by our Black leaders.”

Muslims in America are ethnically and racially diverse and Floyd’s death has also reinvigorated conversations about the treatment and representation of black Muslims in their own faith communities.

“I’m hopeful and heartened by the number and diversity of groups that have signed on,” said Kameelah Rashad, president of Muslim Wellness Foundation, also a co-convener. “That says to me that there’s at least recognition that we as a whole can no longer separate Islamophobia, anti-Black racism, surveillance, and violence. People are reconciling with the notion that means our struggles are intertwined.”

Now, she said, is the time for action.

“It’s vital that non-Black Muslims develop a respect for the resilience and resistance of Black people.”

The statement said: “Black people are often marginalized within the broader Muslim community. And when they fall victim to police violence, non-Black Muslims are too often silent, which leads to complicity.”

---

https://www.thedailybeast.com/officer-tou-thaos-silence-actually-killed-george-floyd

Quote
The image of a white police officer, Derek Chauvin, kneeling on the neck of a Black man, George Floyd, for 8 minutes and 46 seconds has been etched into the American consciousness.

But for many Asian-Americans like myself, there’s another lingering image from that fatal encounter—the face of the Asian officer who stood by and did nothing as Floyd was violently choked to death.
...
Among those who empathized most with Southeast Asian refugees was the gay black civil rights leader, Bayard Rustin. In an ad headlined "Black Leaders urge admission of the Indochinese refugees,” paid for by the International Rescue Committee and published in The New York Times in 1978, 80 black leaders concluded, “If our government lacks compassion for these dispossessed human beings, it is difficult to believe that the same government can have much compassion for America’s black minority, or America’s poor.”
...
Like many Black Americans, Hmong youth were over-policed, stereotyped as gang members, and victimized by the institutional failures that fueled the school-to-prison pipeline.
...
“All of the legislations that were created to punish and criminalize Black people were also the same legislation and guidelines that were criminalizing us,” says Vaj.

Police brutality hit home for many in the Hmong community in 2006, when 19-year-old Fong Lee was shot eight times and killed by Minneapolis police officer Jason Andersen, who had been assigned to the Metro Strike Gang Force. The official account accused the dead teenager of being armed, but later, his family argued the gun was planted by the police after paperwork was uncovered that implied the gun was already in police possession. Black and Hmong activists rallied around Fong’s family in comfort and solidarity in the high-profile case, bringing many into the wider conversation about justice for racist police killings.

"They were the loudest voices for us," Fong's older sister, Shoua Lee told the BBC. "Even before we asked for help from other communities, they had come to us and offered their help."


Fong was hardly the only Hmong slain by the police in and around the Twin Cities. Others include 13-year-olds Ba See Lor and Thai Yang, who were shot in the back with a shotgun by a suburban police officer in 1989; 29-year-old Jason Yang, who police say jumped off a freeway off-ramp to his death while fleeing officers in 2010; and 52-year-old Chiasher Vue, who was shot by police in his home in 2019.
...
Asian-Americans who have bought into the idea of us as model minorities still cannot grasp that the discrimination of Black people around the world has been what informs the racist systems that discriminate against other people of color and actively pit us against each other. The imperialist white supremacist institution that intervened and invaded our countries (giving us our oft-quoted “we are here because you were there”) is the same white supremacist institution that kills Black people at home.

Martin Luther King knew that. Bayard Rustin knew that. The Black activists who uplifted Fong Lee’s family knew that. The white supremacist structure inherent in the police is what clouds any expectation of solidarity between officers of color and the overcriminalized populations they come from.

But what should we expect from a system that was originally founded to uphold the ultimate white supremacist institution of slavery?

At a rally organized by BLM-Minnesota, Tou Saiko Lee, the organizer, stood next to Youa Vang Lee, the mother of Fong Lee, as Youa urged her community to stand on the side of justice. Her presence at the rally was transformative in lending empathy to the Black community from a Hmong perspective. “A lot of people saw their mother in Fong Lee’s mother,” said Lee.

The daughter of Jason Yang, a Hmong man who was shot dead by Minneapolis police in 2010, also lent her support for the #Hmong4BlackLives movement in a lengthy Facebook post. “We are grieving for George Floyd’s family because we know,” Autumn Yang wrote. “And it hurts to see that some people in my own community won’t support BLM due to the color of their skin when BLM is fighting for the same thing that my family fought for in 2010.”

90sRetroFan

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2020, 12:18:39 am »
Our enemies have made a video for us:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVtAjZ0MztQ

The more Americans unite, the more worried Westerners become.

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2020, 09:04:13 pm »
"I Wasn't Listening": How Protests And Hip Hop Are Sparking A New Race Dialogue Across Generations
Quote
MSNBC anchor Ari Melber quotes MSNBC viewers of all ages to explore how views and conversations are shifting about race, civil rights and hip hop. Melber quotes one mother who wrote into The Beat to relay how after watching the show's special report about Black artists and rappers confronting police brutality, she said, “Now I get it, I wasn’t listening to those rappers back then, but I understand now.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXp3tg2Jlt4

I've been monitoring hip-hop for this type of activism in tandem with the True Left ideology for well over a decade now. I'm glad more people are finally listening!

BONUS:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9VQye6P8k0

90sRetroFan

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2020, 11:41:57 pm »
Mainstream journalists almost get it now:

https://us.yahoo.com/news/column-trump-makes-clear-two-202234422.html

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Column: Trump makes it clear: There are two Americas, and November is for choosing sides
...
There is Donald Trump’s America, a world of white racial resentment where the Confederate flag proudly flew, where monuments to traitors are to be revered, where protesting racial injustice is an intolerable act of aggression, and where a pandemic that has killed at least 133,000 Americans and put millions out of work is a mere inconvenience that people will come to accept.

And then, there is what I like to think of as the real America, a deeply flawed country that is starting to come to grips with the wages of racism, a too-violent police culture, a wealth gap, an education gap, a health insurance gap. A country that believes in its better angels, a country that knows it can do better.

In other words, there is Western civilization, and there is America. What we have to do is get people calling them by these names. False Leftists especially need to pay attention: never describe anything bad about the US as "American"; describe everything bad about the US as "Western". This is how we can reclaim Americanism for the left!

WESTERN CIVILIZATION MUST DIE, so that America can rise from the ashes.

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2020, 07:22:16 pm »
Joe Biden: ‘If We can’t Unite America, We’re Done’
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Former vice president and 2020 candidate Joe Biden unveiled his economic recovery plan and stressed the importance of uniting America. Biden said, “The only thing that can tear America apart…is America itself…we need to remember who we are.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSGG9JUOMwE

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2020, 11:53:19 pm »
This is what American unification looks like:


guest5

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2020, 01:24:07 pm »
‘They’ve had enough of everything’: Record numbers of Americans are giving up their US citizenship
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-citizenship-renounce-trump-coronavirus-tax-a9663791.html


Number of Americans giving up US citizenship skyrocketing in 2020, report says

https://www.kansascity.com/news/nation-world/national/article244847412.html#storylink=cpy

A record number of people are giving up their US citizenship, according to new research. Here's why
https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/09/us/us-citizenship-renounced-data-trnd/index.html

Not surprised at all! The political "elites" that run the US and western civilization are some of the most miserable, imbecilic, and Judaic cunts this world has ever known. The societies and cultures they "create" are pure trash!

guest5

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2020, 01:47:04 pm »
73% of US respondents: Gov’t crooked, unaccountable
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A new Pew Research poll has revealed 73 percent of people in the United States believe the government is crooked and unaccountable to the public. The poll found people across the political spectrum share a mutual disdain for the government. Rick Sanchez, host of “The News with Rick Sanchez,” discusses.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T_FWY7Rxw8&feature=youtu.be

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Re: Superiority cannot be taught
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2020, 09:06:02 am »
Soldier Defends Muslim Worker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG6omxJJrw4
From the show "What Would You Do" an American soldier instinctively defends a Muslim deli worker being harassed.
True Leftist in uniform?

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2020, 01:01:48 am »
"True Leftist in uniform?"

Only if he would not similarly defend a Jew. Otherwise False Leftist.

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2020, 02:07:04 am »
Trump voters are not Americans. Uniting Americans means cutting out Trump voters:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GV7w9qyCdMA

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2020, 08:11:16 am »
Mattis on Trump
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90sRetroFan

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Re: Uniting Americans
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2020, 04:37:15 am »
I support this:

https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/joe-biden-urged-appoint-muslim-federal-judges-grace-meng

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The vice-chair of the Democratic Party is calling on Joe Biden to commit to appointing, for the first time, Muslim judges to the federal bench if he were to win November's presidential election.

House Representative Grace Meng made the request in a letter to the Biden campaign last week, asking the former vice president and his running mate Kamala Harris to publicly make the commitment.
...
The letter was drafted by the Muslim Bar Association of New York and signed by the South Asian Bar Association of New York.

In their letter, Meng and the two organisations highlighted that the roles of Muslims in America pre-date "the founding of the nation", pointing out it is estimated between 10 to 15 percent of those trafficked to the continent for slavery were Muslims.
...
In 2016, Trump said he believed Muslim and Hispanic justices should not be eligible to oversee any case involving him because "it's possible" they would be biased against him.