Author Topic: Sudan  (Read 258 times)

90sRetroFan

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11557
  • WESTERN CIVILIZATION MUST DIE!
    • View Profile
Re: Sudan
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2023, 11:34:05 pm »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UG2zULrf9w

It will only get worse! Get out and head straight for the EU! (South Sudanese should also head for the EU!)

Best comment:

Quote
We should invite all of them Sudanese to France.

SudanAndWagner

  • Guest
Re: Sudan
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2023, 08:00:38 pm »
Ukraine 'likely' behind strikes in Sudan, Ukrainian military source says
Quote
Ukrainian special services were likely behind a series of drone strikes and a ground operation directed against a Wagner-backed militia near Sudan’s capital, a CNN investigation has found, raising the prospect that the fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has spread far from the frontlines.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M5iq5x29mY

Comments:

Quote
This seems highly unlikely. Are any other news outlets reporting this?
Quote
Agree. France  or US more likely. This few names could be quickly edited.
Quote
I'd expect that western intelligence agencies are backing this. UK, France and the US all have a presence in the region and view Wagner/Russias work as both destructive and harmful to their interests.  Ukraine really doesn't have the resources to do these things outside their own region, but a partnership with our intelligence agencies would be in their interest.

Sudan

  • Guest
Re: Sudan
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2023, 10:39:31 pm »
Sudan's Darfur refugees report ethnically driven killings by RSF | Al Jazeera Newsfeed
Quote
People fleeing to Chad have reported a new surge in ethnically driven killings in Sudan's West Darfur after the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) took over the main army base in the state capital, el-Geneina.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfJHpsDQxJ4

Comments:

Quote
So much hostility against the poorest weakest defenseless people's, a true sign of the end of time's. Sickening 😢
Quote
May God give victory to all oppressed people globally
Quote
May Allah give freedom to the oppressed
Quote
The brutality of humans is unsurpassed.💔

Worst rightist\Hasbara(?) comment:

Quote
shouldn't you be more mad at the free palestine movement which won't do much about this? because they claim to be the only people who currently care about "ethnic cleansings"

Best comment:

Quote
They are Arab-speaking and driven from their homes, but one major thing counts against them: they are Africans. Therefore, it is not so emotionally taxing to overlook their plight. International media have done their part in desensitizing audiences to injustices in Africa by chronically portraying the continent as a place of perpetual misery. Sure, the Sudanese have been escaping bombs too, but no Sudanese attacked a country of high importance to the conceptual "West". The cameras dimmed after a brief spotlight on the region when it seemed like something more menacing to "Western" interests was emerging elsewhere -- coups in "former" French colonies.

Darfur

  • Guest
Re: Sudan
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2023, 01:10:18 am »
Will Sudan’s War Cause Darfur to Secede?
Quote
After 7 months of fighting and recent escalations in violence, Sudan is at risk of splitting once again. So in this video, we'll break down Darfur separatism, the current ethnic violence unfolding there and whether it could secede in the future.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TTdYtW2VkA

Comments:

Quote
I'm from Sudan, thank you for talking about my country, the Army failed to protect the state and the people from the RSF and its allied Arab militia because they're being supplied by countries like the UAE... kinda whished if you talked about how some countries are negatively impacting the peace process in my country beside the multiple peace initiatives that also complicated the matter.
Quote
we cant do that, its the fault of the west
Quote
UAE is west country?

"Fault of the West", absolutely. Anglo-Egyptian Sudan...

Quote
Darfur (/dɑːrˈfʊər/ dar-FOOR; Arabic: دار فور, romanized: Dār Fūr, lit. 'Realm of the Fur') is a region of western Sudan. Dār is an Arabic word meaning "home [of]" – the region was named Dardaju (Arabic: دار داجو, romanized: Dār Dājū) while ruled by the Daju, who migrated from Meroë c. 350 AD, and it was renamed Dartunjur (Arabic: دار تنجر, romanized: Dār Tunjur) when the Tunjur ruled the area. Darfur was an independent sultanate for several hundred years until 1874, when it fell to the Sudanese warlord Rabih az-Zubayr. The region was later invaded and incorporated into Sudan by Anglo-Egyptian forces in 1916.[2] As an administrative region, Darfur is divided into five federal states: Central Darfur, East Darfur, North Darfur, South Darfur and West Darfur. Because of the War in Darfur between Sudanese government forces and the indigenous population, the region has been in a state of humanitarian emergency and genocide since 2003. The factors include religious and ethnic rivalry, and the rivalry between farmers and herders.[3]

The first historical mention of the word Fur occurs in 1664 in the account by J. M. Vansleb, a German traveler, of a visit to Egypt (Petermann (1862-3). Mitteilungen, Erganzungsband II). It is claimed that, like sūdān, fūr means "blacks", and was the name given by the early light-colored Berber sultans of Darfur to the original inhabitants of the country such as the Binga, Banda, etc. As the historic dynasty's physical appearance became more "Africanized" from intermarriage with black wives and concubines, the appearance of the sultans darkened correspondingly and they became known by the appellation of their subjects, Fūr.[4]
Entire page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darfur#Bibliography

Quote
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (Arabic: السودان الإنجليزي المصري as-Sūdān al-Inglīzī al-Maṣrī) was a condominium of the United Kingdom and Egypt between 1899 and 1956, corresponding mostly to the territory of present-day South Sudan and Sudan. Legally, sovereignty and administration were shared between both Egypt and the United Kingdom, but in practice the structure of the condominium ensured effective British control over Sudan, with Egypt having limited local power and influence.[clarification needed] In the meantime, Egypt itself fell under increasing British influence. Following the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, Egypt pushed for an end to the condominium, and the independence of Sudan. By agreement between Egypt and the United Kingdom in 1953, Sudan was granted independence as the Republic of the Sudan on 1 January 1956. In 2011, the south of Sudan itself became independent as the Republic of South Sudan.

In the 19th century, whilst nominally a vassal state of the Ottoman Empire, Egypt had acted as a virtually independent state since Muhammad Ali's seizure of power in 1805. Seeking to supplant and ultimately replace the Ottoman Empire as the dominant regional power, Muhammad Ali declared himself Khedive, and expanded Egypt's borders both southwards into Sudan, and eastwards into the Levant and Arabia, the latter at the expense of the Ottoman Empire. Territory in Sudan was annexed by Egypt, and governed as an integral part of the country, with Sudanese granted Egyptian citizenship. Ultimately, the intervention of the Great Powers in support of the Ottoman Empire forced Egypt to return all Levantine and Arabian territory to the Ottomans upon Muhammad Ali's death. However, there was no such impediment to Egypt's southward expansion.

During the reign of Muhammad Ali's grandson, Isma'il Pasha, Egypt consolidated and expanded its control of the Sudan as far south as the Great Lakes region, whilst simultaneously acquiring territory in modern-day Chad, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Somalia. Additionally, the hitherto unsanctioned use of the title Khedive was formally approved by the Ottoman Sultan. Egypt was at the height of its power, with Isma'il seeking the establishment of a contiguous African empire that could be a bulwark against European expansion in Africa[citation needed].

Isma'il's grand ambitions were, however, cut short by Egypt's ruinous defeat in the Ethiopian-Egyptian War, which exacerbated pre-existing financial problems in the country caused by his cripplingly expensive programmes of rapid modernisation. This led ultimately to the Great Powers deposing Isma'il in 1879 in favour of his son, Tewfik Pasha. Egypt thereafter withdrew from all territories outside of Sudan, and Egypt proper.

Discontent with the rule of Tewfik sparked two revolts in 1881, the Mahdist Revolt in Sudan, and the Orabi Revolt in Egypt proper. Whilst the military intervention of the United Kingdom in 1882 crushed the Orabi Revolt, and restored Tewfik's nominal authority in Egypt proper, the Mahdist Revolt continued to expand, leaving Sudan under the effective rule of the Mahdist rebels.

The British military presence in Egypt transformed the country into a virtual protectorate of the United Kingdom. Though it remained de jure a self-governing vassal state of the Ottoman Empire, true power now rested with the United Kingdom's representative in Cairo. In the following decade, the United Kingdom reformed and remodelled the Egyptian military on British lines, and British and Egyptian forces gradually defeated the Mahdist rebels, and restored the nominal authority of the Egyptian Khedive in Sudan. However, as in Egypt proper, this authority was compromised by the reality of effective British control.

In 1899, the United Kingdom forced Abbas II, Tewfik's successor as Khedive, to transform Sudan from an integral part of Egypt into a condominium in which sovereignty would be shared between Egypt and the United Kingdom. Once established, the condominium witnessed ever-decreasing Egyptian control, and would for most of its existence be governed in practice by the United Kingdom through the Governor-General in Khartoum. For the remainder of his reign, this would be one of the flashpoints between the nationalist Khedive Abbas II and the United Kingdom, with Abbas seeking to arrest and reverse the process of increasing British control in Egypt and Sudan.
Entire page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Egyptian_Sudan

sudan

  • Guest
Re: Sudan
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2023, 02:33:48 am »
https://www.aljazeera.com/features/2023/11/26/sudan-aid-workers-risk-kidnap-and-****-experts-warn

Sudan aid workers risk ‘kidnap and ****’, experts warn

Quote

A large gathering of international and grassroots aid organisations working in Sudan has met to discuss the increasingly desperate needs of people on the ground as the armed conflict continues to take lives and displace hundreds of thousands – as well as how to work together more effectively.

International organisations need to communicate and coordinate more effectively with local groups, Mawada Mohammed, head of psychological rehabilitation and community development organisation Ud, in Khartoum

She said this “lack of coordination among themselves and between them and governments or international organisations” is one of the greatest challenges local groups face.

Since the Sudanese Rapid Support Forces (RSF) began a military campaign to seize control of Khartoum on April 15, more than 10,000 people have been killed and at least six million displaced due to the heavy fighting that has spread through most states.

The head of the World Health Organization warned that the conflict in Sudan is having “a devastating impact on lives, health and well-being”, as aid agencies raised the alarm that their Sudanese workers are being kidnapped, **** and assaulted.

In a speech to the conference, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said nearly 700 million Sudanese children suffer “severe, acute malnutrition” and the country’s beleaguered healthcare system is nearing “a breaking point”.

MSF staff have endured beatings, death threats and theft during the past months of the conflict, he said. He added that violence and threats were mainly directed towards MSF’s Sudanese staff, a point echoed by other NGOs at the summit, who said female local staff have also been kidnapped and ****.

Aid organisations said they are unable to reach places where people need the most assistance due to fighting and blockades, and warned that local workers are in increasing danger.

Experts from NGOs highlighted that more than half of Sudan’s population – 25 million people – are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance and the medical situation is critical, with 70 to 80 percent of all hospitals out of service across the country.

A call for humanitarian corridors

The checkpoints operated by both RSF and Sudanese Army forces pose a significant obstacle to the movement of people and goods, making humanitarian responses to urgent needs extremely difficult, experts said.

“Unfortunately, there is no way to put pressure on the warring parties to force them to open safe corridors and paths. We continue to urge them to do so but without success,” Salah said.

Aid officials and experts said, however, that nothing can be achieved without political and diplomatic efforts. Lawyer Mohammed Salah said: “The international community must put pressure on the warring parties to put an end to this human suffering and war.”

As NRC’s Egeland noted when he opened the conference, there is no “humanitarian solution for a horrific war”.

“There are political and diplomatic solutions for the war and for the rebuilding of the country, accompanied by humanitarian assistance.”



https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2023/11/24/do-not-ignore-the-suffering-of-sudanese-women

Do not ignore the suffering of Sudanese women

Quote

Women are bearing the brunt of the vicious war in Sudan. The world should not look away.

Sudanese women have always been an inspiration to me.

Now, in a terrible turn of events, Sudanese women are bearing the brunt of the vicious war that began in mid-April between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF). More than six million people have been displaced since the new war erupted including an estimated 105,000 women who are currently pregnant, according to the United Nations. Of the 1.2 million who have fled to neighbouring countries, nearly nine in 10 are women and children.

And sexual and gender-based violence has become an epidemic. According to the World Health Organization, more than four million women and girls are at risk of sexual violence in Sudan.

While a UN experts’ report accused both parties of violations of humanitarian and human rights law, the experts expressed alarm at the brutal and widespread use of **** and other forms of sexual violence by the RSF. Some of the reported **** appeared to be ethnically and racially motivated, the experts said, in a frightful echo of the Darfur crisis of 20 years ago.

A Human Rights Watch report found that the RSF committed a ‘‘staggering number of **** and other war crimes’’ during attacks on West Darfur’s capital, el-Geneina, between late April and late June 2023.

 ”I am four months pregnant,” said a 21-year-old survivor. ”I cannot even count how many times I have been ****.”

A new UN report describes how women and girls are being abducted and held in ”inhuman, degrading slave-like condition in areas controlled by the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) in Darfur, where they are allegedly forcibly married and held for ransom.” Sources told the UN that women and girls have been seen in chains on pick-up trucks and cars.

I am deeply concerned by accusations about regional powers intent on worsening the situation for Sudan’s women.





Darfur

  • Guest
Re: Sudan
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2023, 08:06:41 pm »
Mass Killings in Darfur Revealed as Fighting Between Sudanese Military Factions Escalates
Quote
We get an update on the humanitarian crisis in Sudan, where more than 12,000 people have been killed and over 6 million displaced since April, when the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Rapid Support Forces paramilitary group broke out into fighting. Earlier this month, human rights groups say members of the Rapid Support Forces paramilitary group carried out a massacre of around 1,300 Masalit people over three days in Sudan's West Darfur region and have subjected them to unlawful detentions, sexual violence, ill-treatment and looting. "The overall picture that survivors drew to us is horrific," says Human Rights Watch researcher Mohamed Osman, who details how the United Arab Emirates and Egypt are suspected of backing the fighting between the groups. "What we know is really just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the violations that people are facing day to day," says Sudanese activist Marine Alneel, who lays out how today's fighting continues the country's history of power struggles.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hh_AFnCMyLQ

Schwartze Katze

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
    • View Profile
Re: Sudan
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2024, 12:43:23 pm »
Why Sudan is Dying (and it’s a Global Problem)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HbMDwgXhJk