Author Topic: Name decolonization  (Read 1779 times)

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #60 on: September 27, 2022, 05:53:19 pm »
More success:

https://apnews.com/article/california-kamala-harris-san-francisco-gavin-newsom-native-americans-a198e76b8cb588d3af1f0d68fcec363f

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A prominent law school in San Francisco named for a 19th century rancher who sponsored deadly atrocities against Native Americans has a new name after California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation approving the change.
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The University of California’s Hastings College of the Law will be known as the College of the Law, San Francisco.
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The school was founded in 1878 by Serranus Clinton Hastings, a wealthy rancher and former chief justice of the California Supreme Court who helped orchestrate and finance campaigns by white settlers in Mendocino County to kill and enslave members of the Yuki Indian tribe.

The legislation also lays out restorative justice initiatives to be pursued by the college, such as renaming a law library with a Native language name, according to a statement from the governor’s office.

Newsom also signed legislation to remove an offensive term for a Native American woman from all geographic features and place names in the state. The U.S. government has removed the offensive term from nearly 650 geographic features, renaming hundreds of peaks, lakes, streams and other geographical features on federal lands.

Hastings was previously mentioned here:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/colonial-era/how-did-the-english-colonize-america/msg15273/#msg15273

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #61 on: October 10, 2022, 06:23:48 pm »
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11292687/US-Army-rename-nine-forts-named-Confederate-generals-cost-63-million.html

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The US Department of Defense has announced it will rename the nine US military bases that bear named of officers of the Confederacy.
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The nine Army bases that will soon bear new names are Fort Benning and Fort Gordon in Georgia; Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Rucker, Alabama; Fort Polk, Louisiana; and Fort A.P. Hill, Fort Pickett, and Fort Lee in Virginia.
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Former President Donald Trump previously took a strong stance against the idea of renaming Confederate bases, going so far as to threaten to veto the Defense Spending bill in order to prevent the move from happening.

In 2020, he pushed Congressional Republicans to refrain from voting for an amendment introduced by Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) to strip the bases of their Confederate monikers.

Let's keep up the momentum!

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #62 on: October 13, 2022, 04:33:43 pm »
Not an improvement:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/2022/10/07/fort-gordon-confederate-eisenhower-augusta-national/

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Congress directed the Pentagon to abolish all remaining vestiges of the military’s Confederate heritage, and rebrand its nine bases that continue to honor enslavers and secessionists such as Fort Gordon’s namesake.
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In the end, however, the commission chose to go in another direction entirely and rename the base after Eisenhower — bypassing the five Black candidates and other groundbreaking people of color.

That idea gained traction only after last-minute lobbying from some of the meeting’s attendees, according to people familiar with the gathering. Jim Clifford, city administrator for neighboring North Augusta, recalled someone suggesting Eisenhower would be a more desirable alternative and then “pretty much everyone else piled onto that.”

The unexpected outcome has both perplexed and rankled others who believe the selection of a prestigious White man is at best a missed opportunity, and at worst a failure of the renaming commission’s goal to not merely kill off the military’s racist relics but to elevate minorities in the process. Detractors say it looks like a bid to capitalize on Eisenhower’s association with Augusta National, a longtime symbol of racial division that did not admit its first Black member until 1990, nearly six decades after the golf course opened.

Eisenhower was also a Confederacy sympathizer, as we noted here:

http://aryanism.net/blog/aryan-sanctuary/our-enemies-admit-national-socialism-is-incompatible-with-the-confederacy/

But even if he wasn't, Operation Wetback alone should forever disqualify him from being celebrated:

https://www.ontheissues.org/celeb/Dwight_Eisenhower_Immigration.htm

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In 1954, President Dwight Eisenhower launched Operation Wetback, a shameful initiative to remove (often violently) thousands of undocumented workers--mostly Mexican nationals. In what has been described as a "quasi-military operation", border patrol agents, along with state and local law enforcement methodically targeted Mexican-Americans. The result was widespread fear and abuse.

It is estimated that 4,800 people were apprehended on the first day of the military operation. In the end, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) claimed as many as 1,300,000 were deported--many on their own out of fear. There were reports of beatings. Hundreds of families were torn apart.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Name decolonization
« Reply #63 on: November 11, 2022, 04:10:11 pm »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/school-named-violent-white-supremacist-100010871.html

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Two days after a tightly contested election in the fall of 1898, a white supremacist mob descended on Wilmington, North Carolina — a Southern oasis of Black prosperity during the Reconstruction era — to take back the city from “Negro rule.”

The rioters razed long-standing Black businesses, burned down the city’s only Black newspaper, and overthrew a mixed-race, democratically elected city council in what is considered the only successful coup in American history.

More than a century after scores of Black residents were killed in the insurrection, Wilmington named an elementary school after one of its ringleaders: Walter L. Parsley.

No one protested when school board members approved Parsley’s name in 1999, and the tribute survived for 21 years. But by summer 2020, local activists had connected the name to one of the coup’s leaders, stirring fury and a petition drive to change it.
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What happened in Wilmington in 1898?

In the nights leading up the 1898 statewide elections, Parsley and eight other co-conspirators planned the government takeover at his Market Street home, according to a 1936 pamphlet by local journalist Harry Hayden.

As reporters at the local Black newspaper — the Daily Record — began writing up election results on Nov. 10, 1898, exactly 124 years ago, about 500 white businessmen and Civil War veterans, armed with rifles and racial animosity, barged into the paper’s headquarters and set the building ablaze. The insurrection then swelled to 2,000-strong across town, as the attackers spread now-debunked rumors that Black journalists had fired first.

But the coup wasn’t discussed much otherwise or a regular part of history lessons. On purpose.
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So as Confederate monuments fell like dominoes nationwide, all remained quiet in Wilmington, until a petition in June 2020 to rename the school drew more than 2,500 signatures.

That was the trigger. The following month, an unknown perpetrator vandalized a sign at the entrance to then-Parsley school. In bold red spray paint, the message read: “Rem[em]ber 1898, change the name” on one side, and “BLM” on the other, with a giant “X” through Parsley’s name.

Local civil rights organizations began to rally around name changes — both for the Parsley school and for Hugh MacRae Park, which was named for another architect of the massacre.

“For a young black child to go to a school that was named after someone who imposed a massacre killing black people, that has a psychological effect,” Sonya Patrick-AmenRa, an organizer for Wilmington’s Black Lives Matter chapter, told Port City Daily.

Thank you BLM!

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But for all of the fervor around name changes in Wilmington, racial tension still pervades the city and the school system. Black residents say they still feel the sting of 1898, which significantly reduced the city’s Black population and wiped out the thriving business class.

New Hanover County Schools remain among the most segregated school districts in the country. What used to be Parsley Elementary is more than 80% white and stands down the street from a row of multi-million dollar houses, while schools only a few miles away educate mostly minority students from lower-income families.

For Maxwell, the NAACP chapter president, the name changes are a step in the right direction, but merely one step toward true racial justice.

You will need:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-false-left/firearms/