Author Topic: Western civilization is a health hazard  (Read 1663 times)

90sRetroFan

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Western civilization is a health hazard
« on: July 02, 2020, 01:57:33 am »
OLD CONTENT

www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-climate-change-health-20190116-story.html

Quote
In a comprehensive accounting, epidemiologist Andrew Haines and global health specialist Kristie Ebi reprised roughly 20 years’ worth of research on the effects that a warming environment can be expected to have on heat-related illnesses, diseases linked to poor air quality, food production, and scourges spread by such insects as ticks and mosquitoes.

None of that takes into account the fact that the U.S. healthcare sector’s energy use is itself a major driver of global warming. One estimate blames hospitals, doctors’ offices, biomedical labs and pharmaceutical manufacturing for nearly one-tenth of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions; if the U.S. healthcare sector were a country, it would rank seventh in the world, according to that calculation.

The array of health-related ills that flows from a reliance on fossil fuels is sprawling:

Nutrition: As the climate heats up and agricultural conditions shift, yields of vegetable and legume crops will suffer. In addition, rising concentrations of carbon dioxide will adversely affect the nutritional quality of such cereal crops as rice and wheat, lowering their levels of protein and B vitamins. A 2016 estimate published in the Lancet reckons that by 2050, unchecked climate change will reduce food availability to the average person by 3.2% and will have led to the premature deaths of 529,000 adults worldwide compared with a world without global warming.

Infectious and microbial disease: Disease-spreading microbes and insects will proliferate as some of the planet’s hottest, wettest and poorest places grow hotter, wetter and poorer. Sea-level rise and coastal flooding will do more than drown people and crops: they will also accelerate the spread of cholera, malaria, diarrheal disease, dengue fever, encephalitis and Zika virus. Bodies of water will be plagued by more and deadlier algal blooms (as seen in Florida last year) and tainted more often by cryptosporidiosis, cholera and leptospirosis, sickening more people.

Chronic conditions: Unchecked air pollution and rising heat will cause and exacerbate asthma, allergies and cardiovascular disease. Worldwide, pollutants in the air are reckoned to be responsible for between 6.5 million and 10 million premature deaths annually. In the United States, it is estimated that approximately 58% of the excess deaths are attributable to the use of fossil fuel and arise particularly from traffic, power production and industry.

Heat exposure: The sheer weight of exposure to excessive heat will be deadly across the American South, Africa and East Asia. One modeling study that plumbed data from 451 locations in 23 countries showed that deaths from heat stroke are already occurring, and by the end of this century could rise by between 3% and 12% in hotter regions. Already, rising heat has led to the loss of 153 billion hours of labor in 2017, 80% of it in the agricultural sector.

And these do not take into account the injuries and deaths caused by hurricanes, mudslides, wildfires and extreme weather events — all of which are expected to increase as heat-trapping gases continue to build up in the Earth’s atmosphere.
The World Health Organization has estimated that between 2030 and 2050, roughly 250,000 deaths annually could be caused by climate change. That estimate takes into account only a fraction of expected climate-change effects, including heat exposure in elderly people, increases in diarrheal disease, malaria, dengue, coastal flooding, and childhood stunting.

And the World Bank has estimated that unless governments and societies make preparations to evolve and absorb climate shocks, global warming could force more than 100 million people into extreme poverty by 2030. That carries serious implications for health as well.
That accounting came on the same day that the Trump administration’s nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency, former coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler, expressed his skepticism of scientists’ warnings and promised to continue to unwind Obama-era regulations aimed at addressing climate change.

If Western civilization had never existed, none of this would be happening.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION MUST DIE.

---

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation-induced_cancer

Quote
Up to 10% of invasive cancers are related to radiation exposure, including both ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation.[1] Additionally, the vast majority of non-invasive cancers are non-melanoma skin cancers caused by non-ionizing ultraviolet radiation. Ultraviolet's position on the electromagnetic spectrum is on the boundary between ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Non-ionizing radio frequency radiation from mobile phones, electric power transmission, and other similar sources have been described as a possible carcinogen by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer, but the link remains unproven.[2]
...
Medical

In industrialized countries, Medical imaging contributes almost as much radiation dose to the public as natural background radiation. Collective dose to Americans from medical imaging grew by a factor of six from 1990 to 2006, mostly due to growing use of 3D scans that impart much more dose per procedure than traditional radiographs.[7] CT scans alone, which account for half the medical imaging dose to the public, are estimated to be responsible for 0.4% of current cancers in the United States, and this may increase to as high as 1.5-2% with 2007 rates of CT usage;[8] however, this estimate is disputed.[9] Other nuclear medicine techniques involve the injection of radioactive pharmaceuticals directly into the bloodstream, and radiotherapy treatments deliberately deliver lethal doses (on a cellular level) to tumors and surrounding tissues.

It has been estimated that CT scans performed in the US in 2007 alone will result in 29,000 new cancer cases in future years.[10][11] This estimate is criticized by the American College of Radiology (ACR), which maintains that the life expectancy of CT scanned patients is not that of the general population and that the model of calculating cancer is based on total-body radiation exposure and thus faulty.[11]

Occupational

In accordance with ICRP recommendations, most regulators permit nuclear energy workers to receive up to 20 times more radiation dose than is permitted for the general public.[3] Higher doses are usually permitted when responding to an emergency. The majority of workers are routinely kept well within regulatory limits, while a few essential technicians will routinely approach their maximum each year. Accidental overexposures beyond regulatory limits happen globally several times a year.[12] Astronauts on long missions are at higher risk of cancer, see cancer and spaceflight.

Some occupations are exposed to radiation without being classed as nuclear energy workers. Airline crews receive occupational exposures from cosmic radiation because of reduced atmospheric shielding at altitude. Mine workers receive occupational exposures to radon, especially in uranium mines. Anyone working in a granite building, such as the US Capitol, is likely to receive a dose from natural uranium in the granite.[13]

Accidental

Nuclear accidents can have dramatic consequences to their surroundings, but their global impact on cancer is less than that of natural and medical exposures.

The most severe nuclear accident is probably the Chernobyl disaster. In addition to conventional fatalities and acute radiation syndrome fatalities, nine children died of thyroid cancer, and it is estimated that there may be up to 4,000 excess cancer deaths among the approximately 600,000 most highly exposed people.[14][15] Of the 100 million curies (4 exabecquerels) of radioactive material, the short lived radioactive isotopes such as 131I Chernobyl released were initially the most dangerous. Due to their short half-lives of 5 and 8 days they have now decayed, leaving the more long-lived 137Cs (with a half-life of 30.07 years) and 90Sr (with a half-life of 28.78 years) as main dangers.

In March 2011, an earthquake and tsunami caused damage that led to explosions and partial meltdowns at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. Significant release of radioactive material took place following hydrogen explosions at three reactors, as technicians tried to pump in seawater to keep the uranium fuel rods cool, and bled radioactive gas from the reactors in order to make room for the seawater.[16] Concerns about the large-scale release of radioactivity resulted in 20 km exclusion zone being set up around the power plant and people within the 20–30 km zone being advised to stay indoors. On March 24, 2011, Japanese officials announced that "radioactive iodine-131 exceeding safety limits for infants had been detected at 18 water-purification plants in Tokyo and five other prefectures".[17]
...
The Transit 5BN-3 SNAP 9A accident. On April 21, 1964, the satellite containing plutonium burnt up in the atmosphere. Dr. John Gofman claimed it increased the rate of lung cancer worldwide. He said "Although it is impossible to estimate[dubious – discuss] the number of lung cancers induced by the accident, there is no question that the dispersal of so much Plutonium238 would add to the number of lung cancer diagnosed over many subsequent decades."[21][22]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carcinogen#Common_carcinogens

Quote
Arsenic and its compounds

Lung
Skin
Hemangiosarcoma



Smelting byproduct
Component of:
Alloys
Electrical and semiconductor devices
Medications (e.g. melarsoprol)
Herbicides
Fungicides
Animal dips
Drinking water from contaminated aquifers.

Asbestos

Lungs
Asbestosis
Gastrointestinal tract
Pleural Mesothelioma
Peritoneal Mesothelioma



Not in widespread use, but found in:

Constructions
Roofing papers
Floor tiles
Fire-resistant textiles
Friction linings (brake pads) (only outside Europe)
Replacement friction linings for automobiles still may contain asbestos

Benzene

Leukemia
Hodgkin's lymphoma



Light fuel oil
Former use as solvent and fumigant
Printing
Lithography
Paint
Rubber
Dry cleaning
Adhesives
Coatings
Detergents

Beryllium and its compounds

Lung



Missile fuel
Lightweight alloys
Aerospace applications
Nuclear reactors

Cadmium and its compounds[27]

Prostate



Yellow pigments
Phosphors
Solders
Batteries
Metal paintings and coatings

Hexavalent chromium(VI) compounds

Lung



Paints
Pigments
Preservatives

IC engine exhaust gas

Lung[28]
Bladder[28]



Exhaust gas from engines

Ethylene oxide

Leukemia



Ripening agent for fruits and nuts
Rocket propellant
Fumigant for foodstuffs and textiles
Sterilant for hospital equipment

Nickel

Nose
Lung



Nickel plating
Ferrous alloys
Ceramics
Batteries
Stainless-steel welding byproduct

Radon and its decay products

Lung



Uranium decay
Quarries and mines
Cellars and poorly ventilated places

Vinyl chloride

Hemangiosarcoma
Liver



Refrigerant
Production of polyvinyl chloride
Adhesive for plastics
Former use in pressurized containers

Shift work that involves
circadian disruption[29]


Breast


Involuntary smoking (Passive smoking)[30]

Lung



Radium-226, Radium-224,
Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239[31]
and other alpha particle
emitters with high atomic weight

Bone (they are bone seekers)
Liver



Nuclear fuel processing
Radium dial manufacturing


Others

Gasoline (contains aromatics)
Lead and its compounds
Alkylating antineoplastic agents (e.g. mechlorethamine)
Styrene
Other alkylating agents (e.g. dimethyl sulfate)
Ultraviolet radiation from the sun and UV lamps
Alcohol (causing head and neck cancers)
Other ionizing radiation (X-rays, gamma rays, etc.)


How many of these are we constantly surrounded by in everyday life whether we like it or not? How much healthier would we be if Western civilization had never existed?

---

eatingourfuture.wordpress.com/eating-meat-raises-risks-of-cancer-heart-disease-early-death-shorter-life/farm-animal-b12-deficiency-supplementation-for-meat-dairy-product-consumption/

inourishgently.com/the-truth-about-b-12/

www.veganlifemag.com/debunking-myth-vegans-vitamin-b12/

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Lest we forget all the nuclear weapons testing that has occurred thanks to the west: (Most of the radioactive particles created by these tests are still on this planet, the gift that keeps on giving...)

A Time-Lapse Map of Every Nuclear Explosion Since 1945 - by Isao Hashimoto

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLCF7vPanrY

---

And then there is this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvtDG6Tm1Mk

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn

Quote
Lawns became popular with the aristocracy in northern Europe from the Middle Ages onward. The early lawns were not always distinguishable from pasture fields. The damp climate of maritime Western Europe in the north made lawns possible to grow and manage. They were not a part of gardens in other regions and cultures of the world until contemporary influence.[6]
...
Greater amounts of chemical fertilizer and pesticides are used per surface area of lawn than on an equivalent surface of cultivated farmland,[44] and the continued use of these products has been associated with environmental pollution, disturbance in the lawn ecosystem, and increased health risks to the local human and wildlife population.[45] It has also been estimated that more herbicides are applied per surface of lawn than are used by most farmers to grow crops.

Lawn maintenance commonly involves use of inorganic fertilizers and synthetic pesticides. These cause great harm. Many are carcinogens and endocrine disruptors. They may permanently linger in the environment and negatively affect the health of potentially all nearby organisms. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has estimated[when?] nearly 32,000,000 kilograms (71,000,000 lb) of active pesticide ingredients are used on suburban lawns each year in the United States.[47]

And of course:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Levitt (lawn promoter mentioned in the video)

Quote
Levitt was born in 1907 to a Jewish family. His generation was the second since immigrating from Russia and Austria;[2] the paternal grandparents who immigrated to the United States had been a rabbi grandfather from Russia and a grandmother from Austria-Germany.[3]

When I was a child, I got upset whenever my parents weeded the lawn. Why was "grass" allowed to be on the lawn but "weeds" had to be pulled out? (And don't get me started on what happened to the ant-hills.....) I hated lawns back then already. Lawns are a good reflection of the gratuitous violence underlying Western notions of aesthetics.

---

www.ecowatch.com/teflons-toxic-legacy-dupont-knew-for-decades-it-was-contaminating-wate-1882142514.html

Quote
Teflon was first created, as many miracle chemicals were, in a laboratory accident. In 1938, Roy J. Plunkett, a DuPont chemist, was experimenting with refrigerants when he discovered a white waxy material that seemed very slippery. The material turned out to be an inert fluorocarbon—Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)—that had superior nonstick properties. In 1945, the company patented the chemical and registered it under the trademark “Teflon," touting it as “the most slippery material in existence." By 1948 DuPont was producing about 2 million pounds of Teflon a year at its Washington Works plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia.
...
Starting around 1951, DuPont began using another laboratory-formed chemical known as Perfluorooctanoic (PFOA) acid, or C8 (so called because it contains eight carbon molecules), to smooth out the lumpiness of freshly manufactured Teflon. An unusually durable chemical, C8 first entered the world in 1947 and due to its nonstick and stain-resistant properties its use as a “surfactant" spread with extraordinary speed. The white, powdery compound, often said to look like Tide laundry detergent, would ultimately be used in hundreds of products including fast food wrappers, waterproof clothing, electrical cables, and pizza boxes.
...
The trouble was that the compound—which has since been linked to a variety of health risks including cancer, liver disease, developmental problems and thyroid disease—escapes into the air easily.
...
Because it's an extremely stable chemical, C8 does not biodegrade. Instead, it bioaccumulates, building up in people's blood over time if they continue to drink water or breathe air laced with the substance. Due to its ubiquitous use, the chemical can now be found in trace amounts in the bloodstream of more than 98 percent of Americans, and even in umbilical cord blood and breast milk, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It's also been found in the blood of seals, eagles, and dolphins around the world, including in animals living in a remote wildlife refuge in the middle of the North Pacific. The chemical is expected to stay in the environment for thousands of years.

theintercept.com/2018/07/07/dupont-carneys-point-chambers-works-chemours/

Quote
During its 123 years on the site, DuPont released some 107 million pounds of hazardous waste into the soil, air, and water, according to an environmental analysis completed in 2016.
...
Though DuPont and Chemours have removed some of the contamination in recent decades, the analysis concluded that, at the current rate, it would take another 1,600 years to fully clean up Chambers Works. Even if every possible effort were made, completely ridding the site of the pollution left by DuPont and Chemours would take a minimum of 300 years, according to Andrilenas, who described that as “the rosy picture.”
...
The first cancers in the New Jersey dye workers started appearing in 1932. The company continued making one of the carcinogenic components until 1955, though it had been aware of excess bladder cancers in its workers for decades, according to the occupational health scholar David Michaels.

In the early 1920s, DuPont began making leaded gasoline at its plant by the Delaware River. The manufacturing process not only distributed lead throughout the soil — where much of it remains today — but also poisoned many of its workers. The five-story brick building on the site became known as the House of Butterflies, named for the DuPont workers who seemed to be plucking nonexistent insects out of the air, but were actually hallucinating due to the effects of inhaling the neurotoxin.
...
During the 1940s, Chambers Works was also a Manhattan Project site, which left a legacy of both radiation and fluorine on the site of DuPont’s operations. There are many more contaminants left in the ground at Chambers Works. Testing showed 75 chemicals above New Jersey’s standards in ground water at the boundary of the site. The carcinogen benzene, for instance, was measured at 28,000 times the allowable level. In 1999, the state granted DuPont a 999-year exemption from the usual limits on these chemicals. Many more contaminants exceed safety levels within the site, according to Andrilenas.

If Western civilization had never existed, none of this would have happened.

Seriously, before post-Renaissance Western chemistry came along, non-biodegradable waste did not exist at all. (But, according to rightists, Western civilization is superior.....)
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 02:01:36 am by 90sRetroFan »

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90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2020, 02:31:26 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

And then there are motor vehicles, another of Western civilization's 'gifts' to the world. I'm not even talking about the energy waste and pollution here, I am purely talking about traffic deaths:

www.prb.org/roadtrafficaccidentsincreasedramaticallyworldwide/

Quote
Road traffic accidents—the leading cause of death by injury and the tenth-leading cause of all deaths globally—now make up a surprisingly significant portion of the worldwide burden of ill-health. An estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road crashes each year, and as many as 50 million are injured, occupying 30 percent to 70 percent of orthopedic beds in developing countries hospitals.1 And if present trends continue, road traffic injuries are predicted to be the third-leading contributor to the global burden of disease and injury by 2020.2

As with so many other aspects of Western civilization, not personally participating in it does not keep one safe from its harmful effects, on the contrary puts one in even greater danger:

Quote
In general, pedestrians, cyclists, and moped and motorcycle riders are the most vulnerable road users as well as the heaviest users of roads in poor countries. Most people who use public transportation, bicycles, or mopeds and motorcycles or who habitually walk are poor, illuminating the higher risk borne by those from less privilege.8
...
People in cars are between 8 and 20 times less likely to be killed in a road accident than walkers, bicyclists, or motorized two-wheeler users.13

To say nothing of: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roadkill

Quote
One of the earliest observers of roadkill was the naturalist Joseph Grinnell, who noted in 1920: "This [roadkill] is a relatively new source of fatality; and if one were to estimate the entire mileage of such roads in the state [California], the mortality must mount into the hundreds and perhaps thousands every 24 hours." [1]
...
Very large numbers of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates are killed on the world's roads every day.[9] The number of animals killed in the United States has been estimated at a million per day.[10][11]
About 350,000 to 27 million birds are estimated to be killed on European roads each year.[12]
...
Merritt Clifton (editor of Animal People Newspaper) estimated that the following animals are being killed by motor vehicles in the United States annually: 41 million squirrels, 26 million cats, 22 million rats, 19 million opossums, 15 million raccoons, 6 million dogs, and 350,000 deer.[15]
...
In 2011, Dutch biologist Arnold van Vliet coordinated a similar study of insect deaths on car license plates. He found two insects killed on the license-plate area for every 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) driven. This implies about 1.6 trillion insect deaths by cars per year in the Netherlands, and about 32.5 trillion deaths in the United States if the figures are extrapolated there.[19]

If Western civilization had never existed, all of this could have been avoided.....

---

Next we turn to water fluoridation:

iaomt.org/top-ten-reasons-oppose-water-fluoridation/

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]

If Western civilization had never existed, this would not be happening.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorine#History

Quote
In 1529, Georgius Agricola described fluorite as an additive used to lower the melting point of metals during smelting.[68][69][note 5] He penned the Latin word fluorés (fluor, flow) for fluorite rocks. The name later evolved into fluorspar (still commonly used) and then fluorite.[61][73][74] The composition of fluorite was later determined to be calcium difluoride.[75]

Hydrofluoric acid was used in glass etching from 1720 onwards.[note 6] Andreas Sigismund Marggraf first characterized it in 1764 when he heated fluorite with sulfuric acid, and the resulting solution corroded its glass container.[77][78] Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele repeated the experiment in 1771, and named the acidic product fluss-spats-syran (fluorspar acid).[78][79] In 1810, the French physicist André-Marie Ampère suggested that hydrogen and an element analogous to chlorine constituted hydrofluoric acid.[80] Sir Humphry Davy proposed that this then-unknown substance be named fluorine from fluoric acid and the -ine suffix of other halogens. This word, with modifications, is used in most European languages; Greek, Russian, and some others (following Ampère's suggestion) use the name ftor or derivatives, from the Greek φθόριος (phthorios, destructive).[81][82] The New Latin name fluorum gave the element its current symbol F; Fl was used in early papers.[83][note 7]
...
Initial studies on fluorine were so dangerous that several 19th-century experimenters were deemed "fluorine martyrs" after misfortunes with hydrofluoric acid.[note 8] Isolation of elemental fluorine was hindered by the extreme corrosiveness of both elemental fluorine itself and hydrogen fluoride, as well as the lack of a simple and suitable electrolyte.[75][84] Edmond Frémy postulated that electrolysis of pure hydrogen fluoride to generate fluorine was feasible and devised a method to produce anhydrous samples from acidified potassium bifluoride; instead, he discovered that the resulting (dry) hydrogen fluoride did not conduct electricity.[75][84][85] Frémy's former student Henri Moissan persevered, and after much trial and error found that a mixture of potassium bifluoride and dry hydrogen fluoride was a conductor, enabling electrolysis. To prevent rapid corrosion of the platinum in his electrochemical cells, he cooled the reaction to extremely low temperatures in a special bath and forged cells from a more resistant mixture of platinum and iridium, and used fluorite stoppers.[84][86] In 1886, after 74 years of effort by many chemists, Moissan isolated elemental fluorine.[85][87]

In 1906, two months before his death, Moissan received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry,[88] with the following citation:[84]

n recognition of the great services rendered by him in his investigation and isolation of the element fluorine ... The whole world has admired the great experimental skill with which you have studied that savage beast among the elements.[note 9]

For most of history no one cared about fluorine. Then post-Renaissance Westerners came along and ruined everything. Fluoridated water is just the symptom. The disease is Western civilization.

---

We did fine for thousands of years without fluoride:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teeth_cleaning_twig

Quote
Chew sticks are twigs or roots of certain plants that are chewed until one end is frayed. This end can be used to brush against the teeth,[1] while the other end can be used as a toothpick.[2] Most commonly plants are used that have a high content of tannins (astringent and antibacterial) or other compounds that benefit the health of gums and teeth.[3] The earliest chew sticks have been dated to Babylonia in 3500 BC[2] and an Egyptian tomb from 3000 BC;[1] they are mentioned in Chinese records dating from 1600 BC[2] and in the Tipitaka,[4] the Buddhist Canon, purported to be giving account of events which took place in the north-western India around the 5th century BC.

In Africa, chew sticks are made from the tree Salvadora persica, also known as the "toothbrush tree".

In Islam, this tree is traditionally used to create a chew stick called miswak, as frequently advocated for in the hadith (written traditions relating to the life of Muhammad).[5]

Traditional Sikhs still use datun today as it is written in their scriptures:
ਦਾਤਨ ਕਰੇ ਨਿਤ ਨੀਤ ਨਾ ਦੁਖ ਪਾਵੈ ਲਾਲ ਜੀ ॥ (੨੩)

("Dear/beloved, natural twig brush everyday and pains you shall never get. (23)")
— Guru Gobind Singh, Tankhah Naama,[6] as written down by Bhai Nand Lal

and then post-Renaissance Western civilization suddenly got the whole (colonized) world believing that fluoride is a must for dental care......

By the way, I hope no one here is still using toothpaste.

---

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leblanc_process

Quote
The Leblanc process plants were quite damaging to the local environment. The process of generating salt cake from salt and sulfuric acid released hydrochloric acid gas, and because this acid was industrially useless in the early 19th century, it was simply vented into the atmosphere. Also, an insoluble, smelly solid waste was produced. For every 8 tons of soda ash, the process produced 5.5 tons of hydrogen chloride and 7 tons of calcium sulfide waste. This solid waste (known as galligu) had no economic value, and was piled in heaps and spread on fields near the soda works, where it weathered to release hydrogen sulfide, the toxic gas responsible for the odor of rotten eggs.

Because of their noxious emissions, Leblanc soda works became targets of lawsuits and legislation. An 1839 suit against soda works alleged, "the gas from these manufactories is of such a deleterious nature as to blight everything within its influence, and is alike baneful to health and property. The herbage of the fields in their vicinity is scorched, the gardens neither yield fruit nor vegetables; many flourishing trees have lately become rotten naked sticks. Cattle and poultry droop and pine away. It tarnishes the furniture in our houses, and when we are exposed to it, which is of frequent occurrence, we are afflicted with coughs and pains in the head ... all of which we attribute to the Alkali works."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvay_process

Quote
The principal byproduct of the Solvay process is calcium chloride (CaCl2) in aqueous solution. The process has other waste and byproducts as well.[10] Not all of the limestone that is calcined is converted to quicklime and carbon dioxide (in reaction II); the residual calcium carbonate and other components of the limestone become wastes. In addition, the salt brine used by the process is usually purified to remove magnesium and calcium ions, typically to form carbonates; otherwise, these impurities would lead to scale in the various reaction vessels and towers. These carbonates are additional waste products.

In inland plants, such as that in Solvay, New York, the byproducts have been deposited in "waste beds"; the weight of material deposited in these waste beds exceeded that of the soda ash produced by about 50%. These waste beds have led to water pollution, principally by calcium and chloride. The waste beds in Solvay, New York substantially increased the salinity in nearby Onondaga Lake, which used to be among the most polluted lakes in the U.S.[12] and is a superfund pollution site.

This is how **** up chemical engineering (which is based on Western chemistry) is. In comparison, salt can be obtained simply by evaporating seawater in sunlight (as we have been doing for thousands of years), which creates zero waste!

Evaporation ponds are even visually beautiful:

english.sina.com/china/p/2010/0628/326798.html

www.kuriositas.com/2014/10/the-ancient-salt-ponds-of-maras-peru.html

www.123rf.com/photo_49261894_belo-madagascar-november-24-2015-people-works-in-salt-evaporation-ponds-near-belo-sur-mer-to-extract.html

---

"(Western?) dentistry"

Yes, orthodontics (a form of cosmetic deception) is Western:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_braces

Quote
Around 400-300 BC, Hippocrates and Aristotle contemplated ways to straighten teeth

The man himself!

Quote
Orthodontics truly began developing in the 18th and 19th centuries. In 1728, French dentist Pierre Fauchard, who is often credited with inventing modern orthodontics, published a book entitled "The Surgeon Dentist" on methods of straightening teeth. Fauchard, in his practice, used a device called a "Bandeau", a horseshoe-shaped piece of iron that helped expand the palate.

See also:

trueleft.boards.net/thread/93/teeth

Basically, Westerners want to make teeth look like how they did in pre-Neolithic times.

"what does everyone think about vaccines?"

The main ethical problem I focus on (as a victim myself) is violent vaccination (mainly of children). We must fight for children being allowed to choose for themselves regarding vaccination, as opposed to parents being allowed to make the choice for them. The same principle should apply to all medical treatment (including orthodontics!), not just vaccination.

---

"isn't there an argument to be made that the vaccines a necessary evil insofar as they can save the lives of babies?"

Necessary according to whom? Not according to the babies themselves.

And then there is the issue of whether the vaccinators can be trusted. Do we really know what they are injecting, and whether it helps or harms? If they inject something and then the baby survives, do you really know whether it was because of the injection? Or, if they inject something and then the baby dies, do you really know whether it was despite the injection? It is as possible that the surviving baby survived despite the injection, and the dying baby died because of the injection! The argument you raise above presumes vaccines to invariably be genuine and beneficial out of blind trust in Western medicine, in contrast to default scepticism towards non-Western medical treatments. If a non-Western medic suddenly showed up and told you to swallow a strange pill that you know nothing about when you are not even feeling sick, you probably would not swallow it, and neither would I. This is common sense. The problem is that an irrational exception to this common sense is subconsciously made whenever the medic is Western.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 02:38:22 am by 90sRetroFan »
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90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2020, 02:42:50 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

Next, powered aircraft:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_aviation

Quote
The environmental impact of aviation occurs because aircraft engines emit heat, noise, particulates and gases which contribute to climate change[1][2] and global dimming.[3] Airplanes emit particles and gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, lead, and black carbon which interact among themselves and with the atmosphere.[4]
...
Comprehensive research shows that despite anticipated efficiency innovations to airframes, engines, aerodynamics and flight operations, there is no end in sight, even many decades out, to rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel and air freight,[6][7] due to projected continual growth in air travel.[8][9]
...
Airports can generate significant water pollution due to their extensive use and handling of jet fuel, lubricants and other chemicals.
...
In cold climates, the use of deicing fluids can also cause water pollution, as most of the fluids applied to aircraft subsequently fall to the ground and can be carried via stormwater runoff to nearby streams, rivers or coastal waters.[118]:101 Airlines use deicing fluids based on ethylene glycol or propylene glycol as the active ingredient.[118]:4

Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are known to exert high levels of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) during degradation in surface waters. This process can adversely affect aquatic life by consuming oxygen needed by aquatic organisms for survival. Large quantities of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water column are consumed when microbial populations decompose propylene glycol.[119]:2–23
...
Ultrafine particles (UFPs) are emitted by aircraft engines during near-surface level operations including taxi, takeoff, climb, descent, and landing, as well as idling at gates and on taxiways. Other sources of UFPs include ground support equipment operating around the terminal areas. In 2014, an air quality study found the area impacted by ultrafine particles from the takeoffs and landings downwind of Los Angeles International Airport to be of much greater magnitude than previously thought.[120] Typical UFP emissions during takeoff are on the order of 1015–1017 particles emitted per kilogram of fuel burned. Non-volatile soot particle emissions are 1014–1016 particles per kilogram fuel on a number basis and 0.1–1 gram per kilogram fuel on a mass basis, depending on the engine and fuel characteristics.[121][122][123][124][125]
...
Some 167,000 piston engine aircraft—about three-quarters of private planes in the United States—release lead (Pb) into the air due to leaded aviation fuel.[126] From 1970 to 2007, general aviation aircraft emitted about 34,000 tons of lead into the atmosphere according to the Environmental Protection Agency.[127] Lead is recognized as a serious environmental threat by the Federal Aviation Administration if inhaled or ingested leading to adverse effects on the nervous system, red blood cells and cardiovascular and immune systems with infants and young children especially sensitive to even low levels of lead, which may contribute to behavioral and learning problems, lower IQ[128] and autism.[129]
...
Flying 12 kilometres (39,000 ft) high, passengers and crews of jet airliners are exposed to at least 10 times the cosmic ray dose that people at sea level receive. Every few years, a geomagnetic storm permits a solar particle event to penetrate down to jetliner altitudes. Aircraft flying polar routes near the geomagnetic poles are at particular risk.[130][131][132][133]

Plus:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_strike

Quote
Bird strikes are a significant threat to flight safety, and have caused a number of accidents with human casualties.[3] There are over 13,000 bird strikes annually in the US alone.[4] However, the number of major accidents involving civil aircraft is quite low and it has been estimated that there is only about 1 accident resulting in human death in one billion (109) flying hours.[5] The majority of bird strikes (65%) cause little damage to the aircraft;[6] however the collision is usually fatal to the bird(s) involved.

Most accidents occur when a bird (or birds) collides with the windscreen or is sucked into the engines of mechanical aircraft.
...
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) reported 65,139 bird strikes for 2011–14, and the Federal Aviation Authority counted 177,269 wildlife strike reports on civil aircraft between 1990 and 2015, growing 38% in 7 years from 2009 to 2015. Birds accounted for 97%.[8]
...
Most bird strikes involve large birds with big populations, particularly geese and gulls in the United States. In parts of the US, Canada geese and migratory snow geese populations have risen significantly[17] while feral Canada geese and greylag geese have increased in parts of Europe, increasing the risk of these large birds to aircraft.[18] In other parts of the world, large birds of prey such as Gyps vultures and Milvus kites are often involved.[5] In the US, reported strikes are mainly from waterfowl (30%), gulls (22%), raptors (20%), and pigeons and doves (7%).[17] The Smithsonian Institution's Feather Identification Laboratory has identified turkey vultures as the most damaging birds, followed by Canada geese and white pelicans,[19] all of which are very large birds. In terms of frequency, the laboratory most commonly finds mourning doves and horned larks involved in the strike.[19]
...
Large land animals, such as deer, can also be a problem to aircraft during takeoff and landing. Between 1990 and 2013, civil aircraft experienced more than 1,000 collisions with deer and 440 with coyotes.[17]

An animal hazard reported from London Stansted Airport in England is rabbits: they get run over by ground vehicles and planes, and they pass large amounts of droppings, which attract mice, which attract owls, which become another birdstrike hazard.[21]

Pictures (warning: graphic images of Western civilization):

www.birdcontrol.it/birdstrikegallery-e.html

But not to worry! In order to reduce the incidence of birdstrikes, Western civilization deliberately kills even larger numbers of birds ahead of time!

www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/new-york-birds-killed-70000-planes-flight-path-hudson-miracle-sully-sullenberger-landing-a7528076.html

Quote
Birds took the blame for bringing down the jetliner that "Sully" Sullenberger landed on the Hudson River eight years ago this weekend. They have been paying for it with their lives ever since.

An Associated Press analysis of bird-killing programmes at the New York City area's three major airports found that nearly 70,000 gulls, starling, geese and other birds have been slaughtered, mostly by shooting and trapping, since the 2009 accident, and it is not clear if those killings have made the skies safer.

Federal data shows that in the years after bird-killing programmes that LaGuardia and Newark airports ramped up in response to the gutsy landing, the number of recorded bird strikes involving those airports actually went up.

How about we just kill Western civilization instead?

---

While on the subject of birds as victims, let's not forget:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towerkill

Quote
Towerkill is a phenomenon in which birds are killed by collisions with antenna towers. In the United States, the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that between 5 and 50 million birds are killed each year by tower kill.
...
In at least one instance, several thousand birds were killed at a single tower in one night. Additionally, the unnatural lights on communication towers disrupt bird migration patterns in ways that are still not fully understood. At least 231 species have been affected, with neotropical migrants making up a large proportion of all species killed.
...
There are two mechanisms of bird death due to communications towers. The first is the "blind kill" where birds flying in poor visibility do not see the guy-wires in time to avoid them. This is more of a threat for faster flying birds such as waterfowl or shorebirds. Slower and more agile birds, such as songbirds, are not as likely to succumb to blind collision.

Communications towers that are lighted at night for aviation safety may help reduce bird collisions caused by poor visibility, but they bring about a second, even more deadly mechanism for mortality.[1] When there is a low cloud ceiling, hazy or foggy conditions, lights on a tower reflect off water or other particles in the air creating an illuminated area around the tower. Migrating birds lose their stellar cues for nocturnal migration in such conditions. In addition, they often lose any broad orienting perspective they might have had on the landscape. When passing the lighted area, it may be that the increased visibility around the tower becomes the strongest cue the birds have for navigation, and thus they tend to remain in the lighted space near the tower, afraid to leave. Mortality occurs when they run into the structure and its guy wires, or even other migrating birds as more and more passing birds aggregate in the relatively small, lighted space.

as well as:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird%E2%80%93skyscraper_collisions

Quote
According to FLAP, between one and nine million birds die each year in the city from hitting skyscrapers due to mistaking reflective windows for open sky, or being drawn to lights at night.[1]

According to a 2014 article in the ornithological journal Condor, an estimated 365 million to 988 million birds die each year by colliding into buildings in the United States.[2]

You don't see birds being killed by stationary structures built according to the methods of any other civilization. This should tell you that there is something uniquely wrong with post-Renaissance Western civilization.

---

www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/11/air-pollution-inequality-minorities-breathe-air-polluted-whites/3130783002/

Quote
Blacks and Hispanics disproportionately breathe air that's been polluted by non-Hispanic whites, according to a study. This new research quantifies for the first time the racial gap between who causes air pollution – and who breathes it.

"Pollution is disproportionately caused by whites, but disproportionately inhaled by black and Hispanic minorities," the study said.

Poor air quality remains the largest environmental health risk in the United States, the study warns. In fact, with 100,000 deaths per year, more Americans die from air pollution than car crashes and murders combined.

“Even though minorities are contributing less to the overall problem of air pollution, they are affected by it more,” said study co-author Jason Hill, an engineering professor at the University of Minnesota, who is white. “Is it fair (that) I create more pollution and somebody else is disproportionately affected by it?”
...
The study found that black and Hispanic Americans bear a "pollution burden:" Blacks are exposed to about 56 percent more pollution than is caused by their consumption. For Hispanics, it is slightly higher – 63 percent.

However, non-Hispanic whites experience a "pollution advantage," meaning they breathe about 17 percent less air pollution than whites cause.
...
the scientists found that whites spend more money on pollution-intensive goods and services than do blacks and Hispanics, which means they generate more pollution than the other groups do.
...
Other experts agreed with the research: “These findings confirm what most grassroots environmental justice leaders have known for decades, ‘whites are dumping their pollution on poor people and people of color,’”


Basically a scaled-up version of passive smoking (which children are the main victims of despite adults being mostly the active smokers):

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1748121/

Quote
Philip Morris toxicological experiments with fresh sidestream smoke: more toxic than mainstream smoke

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sacramento.cbslocal.com/2019/03/12/school-cell-tower-causing-cancer/

sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2019/03/13/experts-wireless-headphones-airpods-could-pose-cancer-risk/

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2020, 02:43:19 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

We covered land and air travel, but let's not forget motorboats:

Quote
The environmental impact of shipping includes air pollution, water pollution, acoustic, and oil pollution.[1] Ships are responsible for more than 18 percent of some air pollutants.[2]

It also includes greenhouse gas emissions. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) estimates that carbon dioxide emissions from shipping were equal to 2.2% of the global human-made emissions in 2012[3] and expects them to rise 50 to 250 percent by 2050 if no action is taken.[4]
...
Ballast water discharges by ships can have a negative impact on the marine environment.[1]

Cruise ships, large tankers, and bulk cargo carriers use a huge amount of ballast water, which is often taken on in the coastal waters in one region after ships discharge wastewater or unload cargo, and discharged at the next port of call, wherever more cargo is loaded. Ballast water discharge typically contains a variety of biological materials, including plants, animals, viruses, and bacteria. These materials often include non-native, nuisance, invasive, exotic species that can cause extensive ecological and economic damage to aquatic ecosystems along with serious human health problems.
...
Noise pollution caused by shipping and other human enterprises has increased in recent history.[10] The noise produced by ships can travel long distances, and marine species who may rely on sound for their orientation, communication, and feeding, can be harmed by this sound pollution.[11][12]

The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species has identified ocean noise as a potential threat to marine life.[13] The disruption of whales' ability to communicate with one another is an extreme threat and is affecting their ability to survive. According to Discovery Channel's article on Sonic Sea Journeys Deep Into the Ocean,[14] over the last century, extremely loud noise from commercial ships, oil and gas exploration, naval sonar exercises and other sources has transformed the ocean's delicate acoustic habitat, challenging the ability of whales and other marine life to prosper and ultimately to survive. Whales are starting to react to this in ways that are life-threatening. Kenneth C. Balcomb, a whale researcher and a former U.S Navy officer,[15] states that the day March 15, 2000, is the day of infamy. As Discovery says,[16] where him and his crew discovered whales swimming dangerously close to the shore. They're supposed to be in deep water. So I pushed it back out to sea, says Balcomb.[17] Although sonar helps to protect us, it is destroying marine life. According to IFAW Animal Rescue Program Director Katie Moore,[18] "There's different ways that sounds can affect animals. There's that underlying ambient noise level that's rising, and rising, and rising that interferes with communication and their movement patterns. And then there's the more acute kind of traumatic impact of sound, that's causing physical damage or a really strong behavioral response. It's fight or flight".
...
Marine mammals, such as whales and manatees, risk being struck by ships, causing injury and death.[1] For example, a collision with a ship traveling at only 15 knots has a 79% chance of being lethal to a whale.[19]

One notable example of the impact of ship collisions is the endangered North Atlantic right whale, of which 400 or less remain.[20] The greatest danger to the North Atlantic right whale is injury sustained from ship strikes.[19] Between 1970 and 1999, 35.5% of recorded deaths were attributed to collisions.[21] From 1999 to 2003, incidents of mortality and serious injury attributed to ship strikes averaged one per year. From 2004 to 2006, that number increased to 2.6.[22] Deaths from collisions has become an extinction threat.[23] The United States' National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) introduced vessel speed restrictions to reduce ship collisions with North Atlantic right whales in 2008, which expired in 2013.[24] However, in 2017 an unprecedented mortality event occurred, resulting in the deaths of 17 North Atlantic right whales caused primarily from ship-strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.[20]
...
Exhaust gases from ships are considered to be a significant source of air pollution, both for conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases.[1]

There is a perception that cargo transport by ship is low in air pollutants, because for equal weight and distance it is the most efficient transport method, according to shipping researcher Alice Bows-Larkin.[25] This is particularly true in comparison to air freight; however, because sea shipment accounts for far more annual tonnage and the distances are often large, shipping's emissions are globally substantial.[26][25] A difficulty is that the year-on-year increasing amount shipping overwhelms gains in efficiency, such as from slow-steaming or the use of kites. The growth in tonne-kilometers of sea shipment has averaged 4 percent yearly since the 1990s.[27] And it has grown by a factor of 5 since the 1970s.[25] There are now over 100,000 transport ships at sea, of which about 6,000 are large container ships.[25]
...
Air pollution from cruise ships is generated by diesel engines that burn high sulfur content fuel oil, also known as bunker oil, producing sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate, in addition to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrocarbons.[1] Diesel exhaust has been classified by EPA as a likely human carcinogen. EPA recognizes that these emissions from marine diesel engines contribute to ozone and carbon monoxide nonattainment (i.e., failure to meet air quality standards), as well as adverse health effects associated with ambient concentrations of particulate matter and visibility, haze, acid deposition, and eutrophication and nitrification of water.[28]
...
Of total global air emissions, shipping accounts for 18 to 30 percent of the nitrogen oxide and 9 percent of the sulphur oxides.[2][30] Sulfur in the air creates acid rain which damages crops and buildings. When inhaled, sulfur is known to cause respiratory problems and even increases the risk of a heart attack.[31]
...
Most commonly associated with ship pollution are oil spills.[1] While less frequent than the pollution that occurs from daily operations, oil spills have devastating effects. While being toxic to marine life, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the components in crude oil, are very difficult to clean up, and last for years in the sediment and marine environment.[36] Marine species constantly exposed to PAHs can exhibit developmental problems, susceptibility to disease, and abnormal reproductive cycles. One of the more widely known spills was the Exxon Valdez incident in Alaska. The ship ran aground and dumped a massive amount of oil into the ocean in March 1989. Despite efforts of scientists, managers and volunteers, over 400,000 seabirds, about 1,000 sea otters, and immense numbers of fish were killed.[36]
...
The cruise line industry dumps 255,000 US gallons (970 m3) of greywater and 30,000 US gallons (110 m3) of blackwater into the sea every day.[1] Blackwater is sewage, wastewater from toilets and medical facilities, which can contain harmful bacteria, pathogens, viruses, intestinal parasites, and harmful nutrients. Discharges of untreated or inadequately treated sewage can cause bacterial and viral contamination of fisheries and shellfish beds, producing risks to public health. Nutrients in sewage, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, promote excessive algal blooms, which consumes oxygen in the water and can lead to fish kills and destruction of other aquatic life. A large cruise ship (3,000 passengers and crew) generates an estimated 55,000 to 110,000 liters per day of blackwater waste.[42]
...
Greywater is wastewater from the sinks, showers, galleys, laundry, and cleaning activities aboard a ship. It can contain a variety of pollutant substances, including fecal coliforms, detergents, oil and grease, metals, organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, nutrients, food waste, medical and dental waste. Sampling done by the EPA and the state of Alaska found that untreated greywater from cruise ships can contain pollutants at variable strengths and that it can contain levels of fecal coliform bacteria several times greater than is typically found in untreated domestic wastewater.[43] Greywater has potential to cause adverse environmental effects because of concentrations of nutrients and other oxygen-demanding materials, in particular. Greywater is typically the largest source of liquid waste generated by cruise ships (90 to 95 percent of the total). Estimates of greywater range from 110 to 320 liters per day per person, or 330,000 to 960,000 liters per day for a 3,000-person cruise ship.[44]
...
Solid waste generated on a ship includes glass, paper, cardboard, aluminium and steel cans, and plastics.[1] It can be either non-hazardous or hazardous in nature. Solid waste that enters the ocean may become marine debris, and can then pose a threat to marine organisms, humans, coastal communities, and industries that utilize marine waters. Cruise ships typically manage solid waste by a combination of source reduction, waste minimization, and recycling. However, as much as 75 percent of solid waste is incinerated on board, and the ash typically is discharged at sea, although some is landed ashore for disposal or recycling. Marine mammals, fish, sea turtles, and birds can be injured or killed from entanglement with plastics and other solid waste that may be released or disposed off of cruise ships. On average, each cruise ship passenger generates at least two pounds of non-hazardous solid waste per day.[45] With large cruise ships carrying several thousand passengers, the amount of waste generated in a day can be massive. For a large cruise ship, about 8 tons of solid waste are generated during a one-week cruise.[46] It has been estimated that 24 percent of the solid waste generated by vessels worldwide (by weight) comes from cruise ships.[47]
...
On a ship, oil often leaks from engine and machinery spaces or from engine maintenance activities and mixes with water in the bilge, the lowest part of the hull of the ship. Though bilge water is filtered and cleaned before being discharged,[1] oil in even minute concentrations can kill fish or have various sub-lethal chronic effects. Bilge water also may contain solid wastes and pollutants containing high levels of oxygen-demanding material, oil and other chemicals. A typically large cruise ship will generate an average of 8 metric tons of oily bilge water for each 24 hours of operation.[49]

---

More people starting to get it:

www.timeslive.co.za/politics/2019-03-23-whites-created-cyclone-idai-and-must-therefore-pay-says-blf/

Quote
BLF president Andile Mngxitama charged in a statement that the cyclone, which hit Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi, was “not a natural disaster but a direct consequence of the white, Western system of ecological assault for profits”.
...
“The multitudes that died as a result of the cyclone are not victims of a natural disaster. This is mass murder which could be prevented if the West abandoned its ways,” Mngxitama stated.

Background:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclone_Idai

---

Fracking:

www.commondreams.org/news/2019/06/19/we-need-ban-fracking-new-analysis-1500-scientific-studies-details-threat-health-and

Quote
69 percent of original research studies on water quality found potential for, or actual evidence of, fracking-associated water contamination;
87 percent of original research studies on air quality found significant air pollutant emissions; and
84 percent of original research studies on human health risks found signs of harm or indication of potential harm.

"There is no evidence that fracking can operate without threatening public health directly and without imperiling climate stability upon which public health depends," the Compendium states.

Further information:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_hydraulic_fracturing

Quote
Potential risks are "methane emissions from the wells, diesel fumes and other hazardous pollutants, ozone precursors or odours from hydraulic fracturing equipment, such as compressors, pumps, and valves". Also gases and hydraulic fracturing fluids dissolved in flowback water pose air emissions risks.[11] One study measured various air pollutants weekly for a year surrounding the development of a newly fractured gas well and detected nonmethane hydrocarbons, methylene chloride (a toxic solvent), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These pollutants have been shown to affect fetal outcomes.[17]

The relationship between hydraulic fracturing and air quality can influence acute and chronic respiratory illnesses, including exacerbation of asthma (induced by airborne particulates, ozone and exhaust from equipment used for drilling and transport) and COPD. For example, communities overlying the Marcellus shale have higher frequencies of asthma. Children, active young adults who spend time outdoors, and the elderly are particularly vulnerable. OSHA has also raised concerns about the long-term respiratory effects of occupational exposure to airborne silica at hydraulic fracturing sites. Silicosis can be associated with systemic autoimmune processes.[18]
...
Also transportation of necessary water volume for hydraulic fracturing, if done by trucks, can cause emissions.[20] Piped water supplies can reduce the number of truck movements necessary.[21]
...
Air pollution is of particular concern to workers at hydraulic fracturing well sites as the chemical emissions from storage tanks and open flowback pits combine with the geographically compounded air concentrations from surrounding wells.[18] Thirty seven percent of the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations are volatile and can become airborne.[18]

Researchers Chen and Carter from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville used atmospheric dispersion models (AERMOD) to estimate the potential exposure concentration of emissions for calculated radial distances of 5 m to 180m from emission sources.[23] The team examined emissions from 60,644 hydraulic fracturing wells and found “results showed the percentage of wells and their potential acute non-cancer, chronic non-cancer, acute cancer, and chronic cancer risks for exposure to workers were 12.41%, 0.11%, 7.53%, and 5.80%, respectively. Acute and chronic cancer risks were dominated by emissions from the chemical storage tanks within a 20 m radius.[23]
...
Massive hydraulic fracturing typical of shale wells uses between 1.2 and 3.5 million US gallons (4,500 and 13,200 m3) of water per well, with large projects using up to 5 million US gallons (19,000 m3). Additional water is used when wells are refractured.[34][35] An average well requires 3 to 8 million US gallons (11,000 to 30,000 m3) of water over its lifetime.[35][36][37][38] According to the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, greater volumes of fracturing fluids are required in Europe, where the shale depths average 1.5 times greater than in the U.S.[39]
...
Concern has been raised over the increasing quantities of water for hydraulic fracturing in areas that experience water stress. Use of water for hydraulic fracturing can divert water from stream flow, water supplies for municipalities and industries such as power generation, as well as recreation and aquatic life.[42]
...
In the United States, hydraulic fracturing fluids include proppants, radionuclide tracers, and other chemicals, many of which are toxic.[3] The type of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing and their properties vary. While most of them are common and generally harmless, some chemicals are carcinogenic.[3] Out of 2,500 products used as hydraulic fracturing additives in the United States, 652 contained one or more of 29 chemical compounds which are either known or possible human carcinogens, regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act for their risks to human health, or listed as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act.[3] Another 2011 study identified 632 chemicals used in United States natural gas operations, of which only 353 are well-described in the scientific literature.[18] A study that assessed health effects of chemicals used in fracturing found that 73% of the products had between 6 and 14 different adverse health effects including skin, eye, and sensory organ damage; respiratory distress including asthma; gastrointestinal and liver disease; brain and nervous system harms; cancers; and negative reproductive effects.[49]

An expansive study conducted by the Yale School of Public Health in 2016 found numerous chemicals involved in or released by hydraulic fracturing are carcinogenic.[50] Of the 119 compounds identified in this study with sufficient data, “44% of the water pollutants...were either confirmed or possible carcinogens.” However, the majority of chemicals lacked sufficient data on carcinogenic potential, highlighting the knowledge gap in this area. Further research is needed to identify both carcinogenic potential of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing and their cancer risk.[50]
...
Less than half of injected water is recovered as flowback or later production brine, and in many cases recovery is <30%.[52] As the fracturing fluid flows back through the well, it consists of spent fluids and may contain dissolved constituents such as minerals and brine waters.[53] In some cases, depending on the geology of the formation, it may contain uranium, radium, radon and thorium.[54] Estimates of the amount of injected fluid returning to the surface range from 15-20% to 30–70%.[52][53][55]
...
Produced water spills and subsequent contamination of groundwater also presents a risk for exposure to carcinogens. Research that modeled the solute transport of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) and naphthalene for a range of spill sizes on contrasting soils overlying groundwater at different depths found that benzene and toluene were expected to reach human health relevant concentration in groundwater because of their high concentrations in produced water, relatively low solid/liquid partition coefficient and low EPA drinking water limits for these contaminants.[61] Benzene is a known carcinogen which affects the central nervous system in the short term and can affect the bone marrow, blood production, immune system, and urogenital systems with long term exposure.[62]
...
Volatile chemicals held in waste water evaporation ponds can evaporate into the atmosphere, or overflow. The runoff can also end up in groundwater systems. Groundwater may become contaminated by trucks carrying hydraulic fracturing chemicals and wastewater if they are involved in accidents on the way to hydraulic fracturing sites or disposal destinations.[63]

If Western civilization had never existed, none of this would be happening.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 02:47:04 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2020, 02:46:19 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

And one more thing about lawns:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golf_course#Environmental_impact

Quote
Environmental concerns over the use of land for golf courses have grown since the 1960s. Specific issues include the amount of water required for irrigation and the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in maintenance, as well as the destruction of wetlands and other environmentally important areas during construction. The United Nations estimates that, worldwide, golf courses consume about 2.5 billion gallons/9.5 billion litres of water per day. Many golf courses are now irrigated with non-potable water and rainwater. In 1988, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prohibited the use of Diazinon on golf courses and sod farms because of its negative impact on bird species.
...
In some parts of the world, attempts to build courses and resorts have led to protests, vandalism, and violence. Populists perceive golf as an elitist activity, and thus golf courses become a target for popular opposition. Resisting golf tourism and golf's expansion has become an objective of some land-reform movements, especially in the Philippines and Indonesia.

In the Bahamas, opposition to golf developments has become a national issue. Residents of Great Guana Cay and Bimini, for example, are engaged in legal and political opposition to golf developments on their islands, for fear the golf courses will destroy the nutrient-poor balance on which their coral reef and mangrove systems depend.

For once, the term "populist" is used accurately! Genuine populism is necessarily anti-Western.

Yet thanks to mainstream media semantic incompetence, this is whom most people today believe is a "populist":

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]

---

Depleted uranium contamination:
www.globalresearch.ca/depleted-uranium-and-radioactive-contamination-in-iraq-an-overview/5605215

---

When reality is more absurd than parody:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cg_2sSV2HIo

---

www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/08/13/chipotle-sweetgreen-bowls-may-have-chemicals-linked-cancer/1942912001/

Quote
A story published last week by the New Food Economy, a non-profit newsroom that investigates food-related issues, reported the "cancer-linked" presence of PFAS, also called "forever chemicals," in the fiber bowls used at fast casual dining spots and other restaurants including Chipotle, Sweetgreen, Dig Inn and other locations in New York City.

The chemicals are being investigated by scientists and government officials amid concerns over links to cancer, obesity, reproductive health problems, immunotoxicity and other health problems. PFAS have been used in consumer goods since the 1940s, according to the Food and Drug Administration. They've also been found in water.
...
Why 'forever chemicals' don't go away

PFAS, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, is a family of man-made chemicals that contain carbon-fluorine bonds. The bonds don't break down easily, which is why PFAS are often referred to as "forever chemicals."

They have been used in the production of common goods since the 1940s, according to the FDA.

And PFAS are everywhere: Drinking water, food, cookware, paints, water-repellent fabrics, nonstick products, firefighting foams and more.

Because it doesn't break down, PFAS remain present in our groundwater, soil and in human and animal bloodstreams, the FDA said in a statement.

Screw this "man-made" bullshit. These are Western-made chemicals. They would never have existed if the Renaissance had not happened.
Every other civilization could have been left running for thousands of years more and not one of them would have ever come up with such chemicals. Western civilization and nothing but Western civilization poisons the world in this way.

Quote
There are nearly 5,000 chemicals in the PFAS group. Only a handful have been studied for toxicity, and the results are "very concerning," said Cox.

According to Marchewka, PFAS tend to move "through the entire ecosystem." Because such a chemical may not biodegrade, "it works its way through the entire life-cycle of anything it touches," she said.

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edition.cnn.com/2019/02/14/health/us-glyphosate-cancer-study-scli-intl/index.html

Quote
Common weed killer glyphosate increases cancer risk by 41%, study says

edition.cnn.com/2018/08/15/health/glyphosate-oat-products-ewg-study/index.html

Quote
Unsafe levels of a weed killer chemical in oat products, report says

For reference:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyphosate

Quote
In many cities, glyphosate is sprayed along the sidewalks and streets, as well as crevices in between pavement where weeds often grow. However, up to 24% of glyphosate applied to hard surfaces can be run off by water.[50] Glyphosate contamination of surface water is attributed to urban and agricultural use.[51] Glyphosate is used to clear railroad tracks and get rid of unwanted aquatic vegetation.[41] Since 1994, glyphosate has been used in aerial spraying in Colombia in coca eradication programs

We had been farming for thousands of years perfectly well with no weedkillers. Then Western civilization came along.

Everyone repeat after me: if Western civilization had never existed, none of this would be happening.

(Additional information:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbicidal_warfare )

---

www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6886561/Cell-phone-tower-shut-elementary-school-eight-kids-diagnosed-cancer.html

Quote
Morris says he is not convinced that the tower is harmless.

But he also says other forms of contamination may be compounding factors, implying that a Nestle plant may have leaked toxins into the soil for years.

It's not just the tower that needs to be taken down, it's the whole of Western civilization which needs to be taken down.

---

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HZHbz6mxsw

---

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4ggD86QYP0

---

news.yahoo.com/leaf-blowers-insects-german-government-200143209.html

Quote
Leaf blowers kill insects and cause pollution and should not be used, the German government has said.

The country’s Ministry for the Environment stopped short of an outright ban, but issued new guidance in response to a request by a German Green Party MP.
...
The guidance added that the devices are “fatal to insects in the foliage”.

The government said: “There is a risk that small animals are absorbed or blown and thereby damaged.”
...
In terms of insect biomass (the total weight of insects), the results were even more alarming, with a decline of 40% of insect biomass since 2008.

The whole world had been comfortable with using brooms* for thousands of years. Then Western civilization came along.

(* I have accidentally swept insects hiding inside debris using a broom on occasions, but the insects generally have time to move away - I try not to sweep too hard or fast in order to give them more time to react - and hence are unharmed. This is the superiority of manual tools.)

I don't like vaccuum cleaners either, for the same reason. (When I was a child, my parents used vaccuum cleaners on insects deliberately.)

---

You cannot be green while remaining Western:

qz.com/1759150/reusable-plastic-shopping-bags-are-making-the-problem-worse/

Quote
Over the past few years, reusable plastic shopping bags began showing up in grocery stores in many parts of the world. They are sturdier than the flimsy plastic bags that have become a symbol of the global movement against disposable plastics, and so can be used many times, lending to their marketing as the ethical choice for the environmentally conscious shopper.

But of course, these thicker bags require more plastic to make. That means they could only improve the overall situation if they led to stores handing out overall less plastic, by volume, than they would without them—by, say, replacing thousands of single-use plastic bags a shopper might otherwise use over the years. Because no matter the style of plastic bag, it will still contribute to the global problem of forever-trash entering the environment, and the greenhouse gases associated with manufacturing the bag from fossil fuels in the first place.

But it seems they haven’t. A new report from the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) and Greenpeace looking at grocery stores in the UK suggests that the plastic “bags for life” utterly failed to do the one thing they were ostensibly meant to. So far in 2019, the top 10 UK grocery stores reported selling 1.5 billion of these bags, which represents approximately 54 “bags for life” per household in the UK.
...
Overall, those same supermarkets increased the volume of plastic packaging they put out—including the “bags for life”—by 18,739 tons (17,000 metric tons) from 2017 to 2018. “It’s shocking to see that despite unprecedented awareness of the pollution crisis, the amount of single-use plastic used by the UK’s biggest supermarkets has actually increased,” the EIA’s Juliet Phillips told the Guardian. The grocery stores’ plastic-footprint increase was caused in part by the reusable plastic bags.

“We have replaced one problem with another,” Fiona Nicholls, a Greenpeace UK campaigner who is one of the report’s authors, told the New York Times.

Plastic itself is the problem. And guess who created this problem?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic#History

Quote
Parkesine (nitrocellulose) is considered the first man-made plastic. The plastic material was patented by Alexander Parkes, in Birmingham, England in 1856.[19] It was unveiled at the 1862 Great International Exhibition in London.[20] Parkesine won a bronze medal at the 1862 World's fair in London. Parkesine was made from cellulose (the major component of plant cell walls) treated with nitric acid as a solvent. The output of the process (commonly known as cellulose nitrate or pyroxilin) could be dissolved in alcohol and hardened into a transparent and elastic material that could be molded when heated.[21] By incorporating pigments into the product, it could be made to resemble ivory.

In 1897, the Hanover, Germany mass printing press owner Wilhelm Krische was commissioned to develop an alternative to blackboards.[22] The resultant horn-like plastic made from the milk protein casein was developed in cooperation with the Austrian chemist (Friedrich) Adolph Spitteler (1846–1940). The final result was unsuitable for the original purpose.[23] In 1893, French chemist Auguste Trillat discovered the means to insolubilize casein by immersion in formaldehyde, producing material marketed as galalith.[22]

In the early 1900s, Bakelite, the first fully synthetic thermoset, was reported by Belgian chemist Leo Baekeland by using phenol and formaldehyde.

After World War I, improvements in chemical technology led to an explosion in new forms of plastics, with mass production beginning in the 1940s and 1950s (around World War II).[24] Among the earliest examples in the wave of new polymers were polystyrene (PS), first produced by BASF in the 1930s,[2] and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), first created in 1872 but commercially produced in the late 1920s.[2] In 1923, Durite Plastics Inc. was the first manufacturer of phenol-furfural resins.[25] In 1933, polyethylene was discovered by Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) researchers Reginald Gibson and Eric Fawcett.[2]

In 1954, polypropylene was discovered by Giulio Natta and began to be manufactured in 1957.[2]

In 1954, expanded polystyrene (used for building insulation, packaging, and cups) was invented by Dow Chemical.[2] The discovery of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is credited to employees of the Calico Printers' Association in the UK in 1941; it was licensed to DuPont for the US and ICI otherwise, and as one of the few plastics appropriate as a replacement for glass in many circumstances, resulting in widespread use for bottles in Europe.[2]
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 02:51:44 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2020, 02:56:28 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/17/rainwater-pfas-us-potentially-toxic-levels-study

Quote
New data shows that rainwater in some parts of the US contains high enough levels of potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to possibly affect human health and may, if found in drinking water, in some cases be high enough to trigger regulatory action.

PFAS chemicals appear in an array of everyday items, such as food packaging, clothing and carpeting. Chemicals in this family are the subject of the film Dark Water, which chronicles the real-life efforts of a lawyer seeking to hold a polluting factory to account in West Virginia.

Estimates pin the number of different PFAS variants at more than 4,700 but federal regulations so far target only two of them: PFOS and PFOA. Some of these chemicals have been known to cause serious health issues such as cancer, and immune system and thyroid problems.

Previously it was known that there is widespread PFAS contamination of the nation’s lakes, rivers and groundwater reserves but until recently, researchers were largely in the dark as to whether this family of chemicals could also be ubiquitous in rain.
...
Shafer says he suspects PFAS chemicals are entering rainwater through a variety of avenues, like direct industrial emissions and evaporation from PFAS-laden fire-fighting foams. Still, “there’s a dearth of knowledge about what’s supporting the atmospheric concentrations and ultimately deposition of PFAS”, he says.

Answer: Western civilization.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organofluorine_chemistry#History

Quote
Organofluorine chemistry began in the 1800s with the development of organic chemistry.[17] [36] The first organofluorine compounds were prepared using antimony trifluoride as the F− source. The nonflammability and nontoxicity of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl3F and CCl2F2 attracted industrial attention in the 1920s. on April 6, 1938, Roy J. Plunkett a young research chemist who worked at DuPont's Jackson Laboratory in Deepwater, New Jersey, accidentally discovered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).[37]discovered polytetrafluoroethylene.[38][39] Subsequent major developments, especially in the US, benefited from expertise gained in the production of uranium hexafluoride.[5] Starting in the late 1940s, a series of electrophilic fluorinating methodologies were introduced, beginning with CoF3. Electrochemical fluorination ("electrofluorination") was announced, which Joseph H. Simons had developed in the 1930s to generate highly stable perfluorinated materials compatible with uranium hexafluoride.[14]

---

www.yahoo.com/news/notre-dame-fire-wakes-world-075620750.html

Quote
Poisoning from lead dust can cause permanent loss to cognitive ability, seizures, coma, or death — and exposure is of greatest risk to pregnant mothers and to young children, who can easily transfer toxic dust into their mouths.

After 250 tons of lead on Notre Dame’s spire and roof was engulfed in flames in central Paris on April 15 and authorities alerted Parisians to an environmental health risk, they were forced to cobble together disparate and incomplete research to set a makeshift safety level in an attempt reassure the public.

“When the Notre Dame fire happened, we didn’t have any threshold for what represented dangerous lead levels outdoors,” Anne Souyris, the Paris City Hall deputy mayor in charge of public health, told the AP. “It was a wake-up call ... the amount of lead that was burned in Notre Dame was unprecedented.”

Officials were surprised to discover that while safety guidelines exist in France for lead levels inside buildings and schools, as well as in paint, soil and air pollution, there were zero hazard guidelines for lead accumulations in public spaces, such as dust on the ground.

The inherent danger and the regulatory gap for lead dust became impossible to ignore for French officials as it collected as a toxic film on the cobblestones of Paris’ Ile-de-la-Cite following the fire.

“The authorities basically tried to create safety guidelines after the fire by piecing together a mixture of old fragments of data and reports,” Souyris said. “But there was really nothing official ... we simply didn’t realize that lead outside might be a problem.”

Do you realize that Western civilization might be a problem?

Quote
“Paris is a beautifully preserved city,” Souyris said. “But we realize we have also beautifully preserved its lead.”

Experts say Paris’ rare status as a highly conserved historic city makes it a particular danger spot for lead.

“Preservation does make Paris unusual,” said Neil M. Donahue, a chemistry professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. “Incineration of one of the most famous roofs in the world may be especially dramatic, but there is no alchemy in this world. Lead will remain lead forever.”

Sigh.....

By the way:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead#History

Quote
Lead was a key material in parts of the printing press, which was invented around 1440; lead dust was commonly inhaled by print workers, causing lead poisoning.[159] Firearms were invented at around the same time, and lead, despite being more expensive than iron, became the chief material for making bullets.
...
In the New World, lead production was recorded soon after the arrival of European settlers. The earliest record dates to 1621 in the English Colony of Virginia, fourteen years after its foundation.[165] In Australia, the first mine opened by colonists on the continent was a lead mine, in 1841.[166] In Africa, lead mining and smelting were known in the Benue Trough[167] and the lower Congo Basin, where lead was used for trade with Europeans

In other words, "whites" (including Jews) got "non-whites" to literally mine lead for "whites" to mass-produce bullets with which to shoot "non-whites". Also known as the colonial era.

---

www.yahoo.com/news/u-drinking-water-widely-contaminated-050229550.html

Quote
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The contamination of U.S. drinking water with man-made "forever chemicals" is far worse than previously estimated with some of the highest levels found in Miami, Philadelphia and New Orleans, said a report on Wednesday by an environmental watchdog group.

The chemicals, resistant to breaking down in the environment, are known as perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Some have been linked to cancers, liver damage, low birth weight and other health problems.

The findings www.ewg.org/research/national-pfas-testing by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) show the group's previous estimate in 2018, based on unpublished U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data, that 110 million Americans may be contaminated with PFAS, could be far too low.

"It's nearly impossible to avoid contaminated drinking water from these chemicals," said David Andrews, a senior scientist at EWG and co-author of the report.

The chemicals were used in products like Teflon and Scotchguard and in firefighting foam. Some are used in a variety of other products and industrial processes, and their replacements also pose risks.

Of tap water samples taken by EWG from 44 sites in 31 states and Washington D.C., only one location, Meridian, Mississippi, which relies on 700 foot (215 m) deep wells, had no detectable PFAS. Only Seattle and Tuscaloosa, Alabama had levels below 1 part per trillion (PPT), the limit EWG recommends.

In addition, EWG found that on average six to seven PFAS compounds were found at the tested sites, and the effects on health of the mixtures are little understood. "Everyone's really exposed to a toxic soup of these PFAS chemicals," Andrews said.

In 34 places where EWG's tests found PFAS, contamination had not been publicly reported by the EPA or state environmental agencies.

The EPA has known since at least 2001 about the problem of PFAS in drinking water but has so far failed to set an enforceable, nationwide legal limit. The EPA said early last year it would begin the process to set limits on two of the chemicals, PFOA and PFOS.

The EPA said it has helped states and communities address PFAS and that it is working to put limits on the two main chemicals but did not give a timeline.

In 2018 a draft report from an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said the risk level for exposure to the chemicals should be up to 10 times lower than the 70 PPT threshold the EPA recommends. The White House and the EPA had tried to stop the report from being published.

Again, not "man-made", but WESTERN-made.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRuDM-srsdI

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CfLDXpC324

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Some civilization did something:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iNbPEjnL1M

---

www.yahoo.com/news/trump-tells-colombia-spray-coca-084300438.html

Quote
Trump Tells Colombia: Spray Coca Fields With Alleged Carcinogen—or Else

CALI, Colombia—During a meeting with Colombian President Iván Duque at the White House early last week, Donald Trump more or less ordered Colombia to wipe out coca plants—the main ingredient in ****—by spraying the controversial herbicide glyphosate from the air.

No, it’s not the infamous chemical Agent Orange used in Vietnam, but it’s bad enough, and likely to poison the people and the land beneath the toxic clouds.
...
Colombia had curtailed the practice back in 2015 due to health risks, including cancer.

---

I actually gave a ride to someone once who had gotten cancer from spraying glyphosate and was part of the class action law suit against Monsanto. He told me back when they first started working with it they were spraying that stuff everywhere all day long, with very little protective clothing. I hadn't really given to much credit to the case against Monsanto until that conversation. Sounds like some really nasty ****.

---

Quote
From Fish to Humans, A Microplastic Invasion May Be Taking a Toll
Tiny bits of plastic have seeped into soil, fish and air, posing a threat to animal and human health.

Plastic is a western invention....

Quote
Their size—from about five millimeters, or the size of a grain of rice, down to microscopic—means they can be ingested by a wide range of creatures, from the plankton that form the basis of the marine food chain to humans. As Browne’s 2008 study was one of the first to demonstrate, those plastic particles don’t always pass harmlessly through the body. The finding “was one of those sort of bittersweet moments,” the ecotoxicologist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney says. “You’re pleased that some prediction you’ve made has come true—but then you’re devastated” because of the potentially profound ecological implications.

getpocket.com/explore/item/from-fish-to-humans-a-microplastic-invasion-may-be-taking-a-toll?utm_source=pocket-newtab

---

Western civilization is so bad that coronavirus actually improves things:

us.yahoo.com/news/air-pollution-clears-northern-italy-180047352.html

Quote
LONDON (Reuters) - Air pollution over northern Italy fell after the government introduced a nationwide lockdown to combat coronavirus, satellite imagery showed on Friday, in a new example of the pandemic's potential impact on emissions.
...
The European Space Agency (ESA) said it had observed a particularly marked decline in emissions of nitrogen dioxide, a noxious gas emitted by power plants, cars and factories, over the Po Valley region in northern Italy.

"Although there could be slight variations in the data due to cloud cover and changing weather, we are very confident that the reduction in emissions that we can see coincides with the lockdown in Italy causing less traffic and industrial activities," Claus Zehner, who manages the agency's Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite mission, said in a statement.

ESA published an animation www.esa.int showing how NO2 emissions fluctuated across Europe from Jan. 1-March 11, using a 10-day moving average, clearly showing pollution levels dropping over northern Italy.
In fact just the other day I was saying to Starling over email:

Quote
One side-effect of the coronavirus pandemic that I am actually enjoying is that society has suddenly gone back to something significantly closer to a subsistence economy as a consequence. Less traffic, shopping only for food and other essentials (and hence heavy scaling down of luxury product manufacturing), collapse of nightlife, tourism, etc. have together produced a considerably more tranquil habitat that is instantly much more pleasant to live in (not to mention better for the environment). It is a pity that most people require fear of infection to behave as I wish they could behave even without fear of infection!

I especially love the shutting down of schools and hence children getting a break from the daily violence of compulsory schooling (spread across the world by Western civilization). If only this had happened when we were kids!

---

Quote
The Story Of... Smallpox – and other Deadly Eurasian Germs
Much of the credit for European military success in the New World can be handed to the superiority of their weapons, their literary heritage, even the fact they had unique load-bearing mammals, like horses. These factors combined, gave the conquistadors a massive advantage over the sophisticated civilisations of the Aztec and Inca empires.

But weapons alone can't account for the breathtaking speed with which the indigenous population of the New World were completely wiped out.

Within just a few generations, the continents of the Americas were virtually emptied of their native inhabitants – some academics estimate that approximately 20 million people may have died in the years following the European invasion – up to 95% of the population of the Americas.

No medieval force, no matter how bloodthirsty, could have achieved such enormous levels of genocide. Instead, Europeans were aided by a deadly secret weapon they weren't even aware they were carrying: Smallpox.

In the era of global conquest which followed, European colonizers were assisted around the world by the germs which they carried. A 1713 smallpox epidemic in the Cape of Good Hope decimated the South African Khoi San people, rendering them incapable of resisting the process of colonization. European germs also wreaked devastation on the aboriginal communities of Australia and New Zealand.

More victims of colonization were killed by Eurasian germs, than by either the gun or the sword, making germs the deadliest agent of conquest.

www.pbs.org/gunsgermssteel/variables/smallpox.html

Quote
Did Colonists Give Infected Blankets to Native Americans as Biological Warfare?
There’s evidence that British colonists in 18th-century America gave Native Americans smallpox-infected blankets at least once—but did it work?

www.history.com/news/colonists-native-americans-smallpox-blankets

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Americans Need to Eat 90% Less Meat for Planet to Survive, Report Says
www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/humans-need-to-eat-less-meat/

Quote
In fact, humans need to eat 75% less red meat, 90% less pork, and half as many eggs on average to both prevent the environment-ravaging consequences of climate change and ensure that there will be enough food to go around when the global population surges to 10 billion later in the century.
.......
In the US and UK, for example, people need to eat 90% less red meat and 60% less milk, while some low-income countries are encouraged to eat more meat in the years ahead to improve nutrition standards, but the authors note that such an increase would be paltry compared to eating habits in Western countries.
.......
Meat production is one of the leading causes of deforestation, which accelerates climate change and destroys ecosystems, because of the large swaths of land required for cattle grazing. Raising animals also requires huge amounts of animal feed, which requires even more land to grow, and water.

Animal feed takes up around 36% of global farmland, while a single pound of hamburger requires 600 gallons of water, compared to 5 gallons for a pound of potato, according to the US Geological Survey.
.......
Reducing meat production calls for more of the world’s farmland to be used for high-yield, low-resource crops that put little pressure on the planet and can feed as many people as possible. These include legumes, grains, vegetables, and more.
.......
Meat consumption is high on the list of practices that need to be dramatically scaled down if not nearly abandoned altogether, according to the report.

With some good information, however these issues are still be framed around the terms "sustainable" and are thus from a survivalist perspective.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 02:59:51 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2020, 03:04:45 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

Since ballet was brought up, for the record:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_ballet

Quote
Ballet is a formalized form of dance with its origins in the Italian Renaissance courts of 15th and 16th centuries. Ballet spread from Italy to France with the help of Catherine de' Medici, where ballet developed even further under her aristocratic influence. An early example of Catherine's development of ballet is through 'Le Paradis d' Amour', a piece of work presented at her daughter's wedding, Marguerite de Valois to Henry of Navarre. Aristocratic money was responsible for the initial stages of development in 'court ballet', as it was royal money that dictated the ideas, literature and music used in ballets that were created to primarily entertain the aristocrats of the time. The first formal 'court ballet' ever recognized was staged in 1573, 'Ballet des Polonais'. In true form of royal entertainment, 'Ballet des Polonais' was commissioned by Catherine de' Medici to honor the Polish ambassadors who were visiting Paris upon the accession of Henry of Anjou to the throne of Poland. In 1581, Catherine de' Medici commissioned another court ballet, Ballet Comique de la Reine, however it was her compatriot, Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx, who organized the ballet. Catherine de' Medici and Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx were responsible for presenting the first court ballet ever to apply the principles of Baif's Academie, by integrating poetry, dance, music and set design to convey a unified dramatic storyline. Moreover, the early organization and development of 'court ballet' was funded by, influenced by and produced by the aristocrats of the time, fulfilling both their personal entertainment and political propaganda needs.

In the late 17th century Louis XIV founded the Académie Royale de Musique (the Paris Opera) within which emerged the first professional theatrical ballet company, the Paris Opera Ballet. The predominance of French in the vocabulary of ballet reflects this history. Theatrical ballet soon became an independent form of art, although still frequently maintaining a close association with opera, and spread from the heart of Europe to other nations. The Royal Danish Ballet and the Imperial Ballet of the Russian Empire were founded in the 1740s and began to flourish, especially after about 1850. In 1907 the Russian ballet in turn moved back to France, where the Ballets Russes of Sergei Diaghilev and its successors were particularly influential.

Western, check.

prezi.com/2llvv_y0vyvw/negative-effects-of-ballet-dancing-on-anatomy-physiology/

www.balletforadults.com/4-common-health-conditions-that-affect-dancers/

www.healthline.com/health/ballerina-feet

Health hazard, check.

---

By the way:

Quote
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-heeled_shoe#Health_impacts

Injury and pain[edit]

Wearing high-heeled shoes is strongly associated with injury, including injury requiring hospital care. There is evidence that high-heel-wearers fall more often, especially with heels >2.5cm high,[21] even if they were not wearing high heels at the time of the fall.[22] Wearing high heels is also associated with musculoskeletal pain,[22] specifically pain in the paraspinal muscles (muscles running up the back along the spine)[citation needed] and specifically with heel pain and plantar calluses (only women tested).[21]

A 2001 survey conducted by researchers from Pennsylvania State University using 200 women found that 58% of women complained of lower back pain when wearing heels and 55% of women said they felt the worst overall back pain when wearing the highest heel.[23] The researchers explained that as heel height increases, the body is forced to take on an unnatural posture to maintain its center of gravity. This changed position places more pressure and tension on the lower lumbar spine which explains why the women complained of severe back pain at a higher heel length.

In a 1992 study, researchers from the University of California, Davis and Thomas Jefferson University wanted to investigate the effects of increased heel height on foot pressure using forty-five female participants walking across a pressure plate in various heel heights.[24] A Biokinetics software was used to analyze the exact pressure locations on and along each participants' foot. The researchers were able to conclude that an increase in heel height lead to an increase in pressure beneath each of the Metatarsal bones of the foot. Additionally, they found that the highest heel heights caused constant pressure that could not be evenly dispersed across the foot.

In a 2012 study, Kai-Yu Ho, Mark Blanchette and Christopher Powers, wanted to determine if heel height increased patellofemoral joint stress during walking.[25] The patellofemoral joint refers to junction where the femur and patella meet. The study consisted of eleven participants wearing tracking and reflective markers as they walked across a 10-meter force plated walkway in low, medium and high heels. The study showed that as the height of the heel increased, the ball of the foot experienced an increase in pressure resulting in increased discomfort levels and peak patellofemoral joint stress. The researchers also mentioned that the long term usage of high heels would lead to repetitive overstress of the joint which would result in an increase in pain and eventually, patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis and Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

In a 2012 study, researchers examined the risk long time high heel wearers would have in regards to calf Muscle fascicle length and strain.[26] The control group consisted of women who wore heels for less than ten hours weekly and the experimental group consisted of women who wore heels for a minimum of forty hours weekly for at least two years. The experimental group was told to walk down a walkway barefoot and in heels while the control group walked down barefoot as cameras recorded their movements to calculate muscle fascicle lengths. The data showed that wearing heels shortened the length of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicles in the calf significantly as well as increasing stiffness in the Achilles Tendon. The experimental group also demonstrated a larger amount of strain on the muscle fascicles while walking in heels because of the flexed position the foot is forced into. The researchers were able to estimate that when wearing heels, the estimated fascicle strains were approximately three times higher and the fascicle strain rate was approximately six times higher. Additionally, they were able to conclude that the long term usage of high heels can increase the risk of injuries such as strain along with discomfort and muscle fatigue.

Bunions[edit]

High-heeled shoes almost always have pointed toeboxes[27] which do not fit around the toes, but displace them from their natural position.

Wearing high-heeled shoes is associated with developing bunions, a deformity of the foot.[22][21]

Balance control of the body[edit]

In 2016, scientists from the Department of Physical Therapy in the Sahmyook University in Korea conducted a study to examine the effects of increased heel height and gait velocity on balance control.[28] Balance control refers to the ability of the body to maintain itself along the line of the center of gravity within a base of support. This must be achieved with minimal postural sway velocity which is the horizontal movement of a body trying to maintain balance when standing still. Wearing high heels narrows the base of support that the body has in order to avoid falling and also restricts the area within which the body must sway. In this study, the participants were told to wear either a low or high heel and walk at a low and high speed on a treadmill. As a result of this experiment, the researchers were able to conclude that as heel height increased, the sway velocity of the bodies increased which also modified the position of the knee joint. Muscles have to realign the entire body especially the hips along the line of gravity. As the weight of the body shifted forward, the hips were taken out of alignment and the knee joints experienced stress in order to adjust to the shift.

Postural effects[edit]

In a 2016 study from the Sahmyook University in Korea, researchers wanted to investigate the effects of high heels on the activation of muscles in the cervical and lumbar portions of the spine which refers to the neck and lower back.[29] Thirteen women were recruited to walk down a walkway in three different testing conditions: barefoot, in 4 cm heels and in 10 cm heels. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle mass of the women's spines as well as their feet to measure the electrical activity of muscles at different points of movement. The results of the study indicated an increase in both cervical and lumbar muscle activation as heel height increased. The cervical spine, the neck, assists in maintaining head stability and postural control in the body. The usage of high heels shifts the body's center of mass which forces the spine to adjust itself in order to maintain balance. The researchers mentioned that over time these results would increase local muscle fatigue that could lead to muscle swelling, decreased muscle movement and even tissue deformation.

Vein swelling[edit]

Further research reveals that another possible consequence of wearing high heels is an increase of pressure in one's veins. Experiments have proven that the higher the heel, the "higher [the] venous pressure in the leg." This means that after repeated use of high heels, varicose veins and other undesirable symptoms are much more likely to appear in the legs.[18] Other research supports these two claims when arguing that wearing high heels can lead to numerous long term effects, including accidental trauma to multiple areas of the body.[4]

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Quote
In recent years, surging numbers of infants have gotten minor surgeries for “tongue tie,” to help with breastfeeding or prevent potential health issues. But research suggests many of those procedures could be unnecessary.

getpocket.com/explore/item/why-so-many-babies-are-getting-their-tongues-clipped?utm_source=pocket-newtab

What a wonderful world....

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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingual_frenectomy

Quote
some South Korean parents have their children undergo frenectomy "which lengthens the tongue by about one millimeter" in the belief they will pronounce English better.[3]

And some people think Eurocentrism is not as bad as I say it is. No, it's worse.

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Quote
Forest fires burning in northern Ukraine are now just a few kilometers from the abandoned Chernobyl nuclear plant. Emergency services insist the fires are under control, but environmental groups claim radiation levels are rising. The area has been empty since the nuclear disaster in 1986.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayrrlp-XjIQ

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www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/17/us-coronavirus-people-of-color-pollution

Quote
For decades, organizations on the frontlines of environmental justice have pleaded with politicians and policymakers to pay attention to the public health impacts of pollution on disadvantaged communities. Activists knew all too well that toxins from industrial runoff and other sources were shortening the lives of many brown and black Americans, but policymakers rarely listened.

According to some estimates, more than 100,000 people die prematurely from air pollution every year in America. About 25 million people – including 7 million children – have asthma. We also know that a disproportionate share of those deaths are composed of African Americans and Latinx people.

One of the reasons that black and brown communities are getting infected and dying at higher rates from Covid-19 is the air they breathe. A recent Harvard TH Chan school of public health study confirmed that “people with Covid-19 who live in US regions with high levels of air pollution are more likely to die from the disease than people who live in less polluted areas”.
...
The term “the wrong complexion for protection” was coined by Latinx environmental justice leaders more than 30 years ago and popularized by Drs Robert Bullard and Beverly Wright in their book by the same name, which highlighted how people of color were disproportionately affected by toxic pollution.

Western civilization will keep killing us until we kill it.

---

us.yahoo.com/news/people-stay-home-earth-turns-053219600.html

Quote
As people across the globe stay home to stop the spread of the new coronavirus, the air has cleaned up, albeit temporarily. Smog stopped choking New Delhi, one of the most polluted cities in the world, and India’s getting views of sights not visible in decades. Nitrogen dioxide pollution in the n ortheastern United States is down 30%. Rome air pollution levels from mid-March to mid-April were down 49% from a year ago. Stars seems more visible at night.

People are also noticing animals in places and at times they don't usually. Coyotes have meandered along downtown Chicago’s Michigan Avenue and near San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. A puma roamed the streets of Santiago, Chile. Goats took over a town in Wales. In India, already daring wildlife has become bolder with hungry monkeys entering homes and opening refrigerators to look for food.
...
“It is giving us this quite extraordinary insight into just how much of a mess we humans are making of our beautiful planet,” says conservation scientist Stuart Pimm of Duke University. “This is giving us an opportunity to magically see how much better it can be.”

Which is still only a small fraction of how much better it would have been if Western civilization had never existed. It's not generic humans making the mess, it's Westernized humans.

Quote
Researchers are tracking dramatic drops in traditional air pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide, smog and tiny particles. These types of pollution kill up to 7 million people a year worldwide, according to Health Effects Institute president Dan Greenbaum.

The air from Boston to Washington is its cleanest since a NASA satellite started measuring nitrogen dioxide,in 2005, says NASA atmospheric scientist Barry Lefer. Largely caused by burning of fossil fuels, this pollution is short-lived, so the air gets cleaner quickly.

Compared to the previous five years, March air pollution is down 46% in Paris, 35% in Bengaluru, India, 38% in Sydney, 29% in Los Angeles, 26% in Rio de Janeiro and 9% in Durban, South Africa, NASA measurements show.

---

High microplastic concentration found on ocean floor
Quote
Scientists have identified the highest levels of microplastics ever recorded on the seafloor.

The contamination was found in sediments pulled from the bottom of the Mediterranean, near Italy.

The analysis, led by the University of Manchester, found up to 1.9 million plastic pieces per square metre.

These items likely included fibres from clothing and other synthetic textiles, and tiny fragments from larger objects that had broken down over time.

The researchers' investigations lead them to believe that microplastics (smaller than 1mm) are being concentrated in specific locations on the ocean floor by powerful bottom currents.

"These currents build what are called drift deposits; think of underwater sand dunes," explained Dr Ian Kane, who fronted the international team.

"They can be tens of kilometres long and hundreds of metres high. They are among the largest sediment accumulations on Earth. They're made predominantly of very fine silt, so it's intuitive to expect microplastics will be found within them," he told BBC News.
www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52489126

Earth is becoming 'Planet Plastic'

Quote
US scientists have calculated the total amount of plastic ever made and put the number at 8.3 billion tonnes.

It is an astonishing mass of material that has essentially been created only in the last 65 years or so.

The 8.3 billion tonnes is as heavy as 25,000 Empire State Buildings in New York, or a billion elephants.

The great issue is that plastic items, like packaging, tend to be used for very short periods before being discarded.

More than 70% of the total production is now in waste streams, sent largely to landfill - although too much of it just litters the wider environment, including the oceans.

"We are rapidly heading towards 'Planet Plastic', and if we don't want to live on that kind of world then we may have to rethink how we use some materials, in particular plastic," Dr Roland Geyer told BBC News.
www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-40654915

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8gfbKVQXz0

---

Meat-Heavy Diets Now Kill More People Than Tobacco
www.livekindly.co/meat-heavy-diets-kill-more-people-than-tobacco/

Quote
               Eating a meat-heavy diet kills more than smoking tobacco

A new study has shown meat-heavy diets have higher health risks and may kill more people than tobacco.

Published in The Lancet journal, the study tracked consumption trends in 195 countries by looking at data from between 1995 and 2017. Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, it shows that a poor diet can be associated with one-fifth of deaths worldwide.

Dr. Ashkan Afshin, an assistant professor of Health Metrics Sciences at the University of Washington, and one of the study’s authors characterized “poor diet” for CBS News.

He explained, “Poor dietary habits, which is a combination of high intake of unhealthy foods, such as red meat, processed meat, and sugar-sweetened beverages and a low intake of healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and seeds, overall causes more deaths than any other risk factors globally.”



The study elaborates that worldwide, the recorded dietary risk factors contributed to 11 million deaths in 2017. CBS News reported that unhealthy, meat-heavy diets are “responsible for more deaths than tobacco and high blood pressure.”

However, the study also revealed that it isn’t just about reducing the amount of red meat, processed meats and other risk factors such as high sodium. The key is to include more healthy dietary aspects, such as fruit, vegetables, and whole grains.

Afshin commented that public health advice should “focus on healthy replacements for unhealthy foods” rather than simply avoiding “unhealthy foods like processed meat and sugary drinks.”


               The study recommends increasing the amount of nuts, seeds and whole grains


Health and Diet

The study follows a range of other investigations into the effect of diet on issues such as heart disease.

A 2018 study by the American Heart Association (AHA) showed that a vegan diet could help reduce inflammation, and therefore the risk of heart disease. The eight-week study monitored 100 participants suffering from coronary artery disease.

Some followed a plant-based diet and some followed the AHA-recommended diet, which allows small amounts of lean meats, fish, eggs, and low-fat dairy products. The AHA found that those on the vegan diet saw the best results, with inflammation reduced significantly more compared to other groups.

A 2017 study had similar findings. It explained that by replacing two servings of animal protein in your diet with two servings of plant-based protein every day, cholesterol markers could be reduced by five percent, lowering the overall chance of developing heart disease.

The U.S. ranked 43rd in the number of diet-related deaths in the most recent study, titled “Health effects of dietary risks in 195 countries, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017”
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 03:06:56 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2020, 03:09:57 am »
ehtrust.org/new-study-power-lines-linked-to-brain-tumors/

Quote
The journal Environmental Research has published a new study entitled “Residential proximity to power lines and risk of brain tumor in the general population” which found an increased risk of brain tumors was associated with living near power lines. Powerlines are a source of residential exposure to magnetic field electromagnetic radiation (EMF) and repeated research studies for decades have associated magnetic field power-line frequency ELF-EMF from power lines to a type of childhood leukemia.

In 2001 the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that exposure to power-line frequency ELF-EMF is a “possible” human carcinogen- a decision based largely evidence of an increased risk for childhood leukemias with residential exposure .

Kaiser Permanente researchers have published several studies linking pregnant women’s exposure to magnetic field electromagnetic fields to not only increased miscarriage and but also increased ADHD, obesity and asthma in the woman’s prenatally exposed children.

So, which civilization invented power lines? (Hint: see title of thread.)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overhead_power_line#History

Quote
The first transmission of electrical impulses over an extended distance was demonstrated on July 14, 1729 by the physicist Stephen Gray.[citation needed] The demonstration used damp hemp cords suspended by silk threads (the low resistance of metallic conductors not being appreciated at the time).

However the first practical use of overhead lines was in the context of telegraphy. By 1837 experimental commercial telegraph systems ran as far as 20 km (13 miles). Electric power transmission was accomplished in 1882 with the first high-voltage transmission between Munich and Miesbach (60 km). 1891 saw the construction of the first three-phase alternating current overhead line on the occasion of the International Electricity Exhibition in Frankfurt, between Lauffen and Frankfurt.

In 1912 the first 110 kV-overhead power line entered service followed by the first 220 kV-overhead power line in 1923. In the 1920s RWE AG built the first overhead line for this voltage and in 1926 built a Rhine crossing with the pylons of Voerde, two masts 138 meters high.

And, going back to the first link, how did other Westerners discover power lines are a health hazard?

Quote
Two published studies by the Ramazzini Institute “Carcinogenic Synergism of S-50 Hz MF Plus Formaldehyde in Rats” (2016) and “Life-span exposure to sinusoidal-50 Hz magnetic field and acute low-dose γ radiation induce carcinogenic effects in Sprague-Dawley rats” (2016) found that ELF exposed rats had statistically significant increased incidence of several type of malignant tumors when combined with a known carcinogen.

Western civilization damages even more health just to check that it was damaging health!

---

www.npr.org/2020/06/04/869936256/russian-power-plant-spills-thousands-of-tons-of-oil-into-arctic-region

Quote
Russian President Vladimir Putin has declared a state of emergency after a giant diesel fuel spill in a remote Arctic region 1,800 miles from Moscow.
...
Of the approximately 23,000 U.S. tons of oil products that spilled into the environment, nearly 17,000 tons flowed into a river, according to Russia's environmental inspection agency. By comparison, the volume of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill off the coast of Alaska was about 39,000 tons of oil.
...
Dyachenko said on state television that the fuel reservoir at the power plant may have collapsed because of thawing permafrost, a result of global warming and a threat to constructions across the Arctic region.

Burning fossil fuels leads to global warming, which leads to the same fuel getting spilled. The most important point is that none of this would ever have happened if one particular civilization never existed. Which one do you think it is?

Quote
restoring the ecological balance in the affected bodies of water will take decades, according to Russia's Federal Fisheries Service.

Environmentalists are criticizing the clean-up efforts on the Ambarnaya River.

"The booms that were set up will only collect an insignificant part of the pollution, so we can assert that almost all of the diesel fuel will remain in the environment," Greenpeace Russia said in a statement.

So, which civilization invented diesel in the first place?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_fuel#Origins

Quote
Diesel fuel originated from experiments conducted by German scientist and inventor Rudolf Diesel for his compression-ignition engine he invented in 1892.

Yep, the same one as usual.....

Further information:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_fuel#Hazards

Quote
NOx[edit]
...
Diesel engines, like other lean-burn (excess of oxygen in proportion to the fuel) forms of combustion, recombine the atmospheric oxygen (O2) and nitrogen (N2) into mono-nitrogen oxides NO and NO2, collectively known as NOx, due to the high temperature and pressure. While naturally present in the atmosphere, their excess can contribute to smog and acid rain, as well as influence human health after reacting with ammonia, moisture, and other compounds.
...
Particles[edit]
...
Small particles (PM 2.5) can penetrate deeply into lung tissue and damage it, causing premature death in extreme cases.[57] Inhalation of such particles may cause or worsen respiratory diseases, such as emphysema or bronchitis, or may also aggravate existing heart disease.
...
Environment hazards of sulfur[edit]

High levels of sulfur in diesel are harmful for the environment because they prevent the use of catalytic diesel particulate filters to control diesel particulate emissions, as well as more advanced technologies, such as nitrogen oxide (NOx) adsorbers (still under development), to reduce emissions. Moreover, sulfur in the fuel is oxidized during combustion, producing sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide, that in presence of water rapidly convert to sulfuric acid, one of the chemical processes that results in acid rain.
...
Algae, microbes, and water contamination[edit]
...
There has been much discussion and misunderstanding of algae in diesel fuel. Algae need light to live and grow. As there is no sunlight in a closed fuel tank, no algae can survive, but some microbes can survive and feed on the diesel fuel.[62]

These microbes form a colony that lives at the interface of fuel and water. They grow quite fast in warmer temperatures. They can even grow in cold weather when fuel tank heaters are installed. Parts of the colony can break off and clog the fuel lines and fuel filters.[63]

Water in fuel can damage a fuel injection pump; some diesel fuel filters also trap water. Water contamination in diesel fuel can lead to freezing while in the fuel tank. The freezing water that saturates the fuel will sometimes clog the fuel injector pump.[64] Once the water inside the fuel tank has started to freeze, gelling is more likely to occur. When the fuel is gelled it is not effective until the temperature is raised and the fuel returns to a liquid state.

Road hazard[edit]

Diesel is less flammable than gasoline / petrol. However, because it evaporates slowly, any spills on a roadway can pose a slip hazard to vehicles.[65] After the light fractions have evaporated, a greasy slick is left on the road which reduces tire grip and traction, and can cause vehicles to skid. The loss of traction is similar to that encountered on black ice, resulting in especially dangerous situations for two-wheeled vehicles, such as motorcycles and bicycles, in roundabouts.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_exhaust#Health_concerns

Quote
Emissions from diesel vehicles have been reported to be significantly more harmful than those from petrol vehicles.[42][better source needed] Diesel combustion exhaust is a source of atmospheric soot and fine particles, which is a component of the air pollution implicated in human cancer,[43][44] heart and lung damage,[45] and mental functioning.[46] Moreover, diesel exhaust contains contaminants listed as carcinogenic for humans by the IARC (part of the World Health Organization of the United Nations), as present in their List of IARC Group 1 carcinogens.[7] Diesel exhaust pollution is thought[by whom?] to account for around one quarter of the pollution in the air in previous decades,[when?] and a high share of sickness caused by automotive pollution.[47][better source needed]
...
Exposure to diesel exhaust and diesel particulate matter (DPM) is an occupational hazard to truckers, railroad workers, occupants of residential homes in vicinity of a rail yard, and miners using diesel-powered equipment in underground mines. Adverse health effects have also been observed in the general population at ambient atmospheric particle concentrations well below the concentrations in occupational settings.

In March 2012, U.S. government scientists showed that underground miners exposed to high levels of diesel fumes have a threefold increased risk for contracting lung cancer compared with those exposed to low levels. The $11.5 million Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) followed 12,315 miners, controlling for key carcinogens such as cigarette smoke, radon, and asbestos. This allowed scientists to isolate the effects of diesel fumes.[48][49]

For over 10 years, concerns have been raised in the USA regarding children's exposure to DPM as they ride diesel-powered school buses to and from school.[50]
...
Diesel particulate matter (DPM), sometimes also called diesel exhaust particles (DEP), is the particulate component of diesel exhaust, which includes diesel soot and aerosols such as ash particulates, metallic abrasion particles, sulfates, and silicates. When released into the atmosphere, DPM can take the form of individual particles or chain aggregates, with most in the invisible sub-micrometre range of 100 nanometers, also known as ultrafine particles (UFP) or PM0.1.

The main particulate fraction of diesel exhaust consists of fine particles. Because of their small size, inhaled particles may easily penetrate deep into the lungs.[1] The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the exhaust stimulate nerves in the lungs, causing reflex coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.[52] The rough surfaces of these particles makes it easy for them to bind with other toxins in the environment, thus increasing the hazards of particle inhalation.
...
Exposures have been linked with acute short-term symptoms such as headache, dizziness, light-headedness, nausea, coughing, difficult or labored breathing, tightness of chest, and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat.[55] Long-term exposures can lead to chronic, more serious health problems such as cardiovascular disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer.[43][44][56] Elemental carbon attributable to traffic was significantly associated with wheezing at age 1 and persistent wheezing at age 3 in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study birth cohort study.[57]

The NERC-HPA funded Traffic Pollution and Health in London project at King's College London is currently[when?] seeking to refine understanding of the health effects of traffic pollution.[58] Ambient traffic-related air pollution was associated with decreased cognitive function in older men.[46]
...
Experiments in 2013 showed that diesel exhaust impaired bees' ability to detect the scent of oilseed **** flowers.[63]

Meanwhile, rightists complain about protestors destroying motor vehicles. If you ask me, the protestors in so doing are probably improving national health.

90sRetroFan

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2020, 03:11:17 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xm2RptLrTE8

Fill in the blank: "Nuclear waste would not exist if _ _ _ _ _ _ _ civilization did not exist."

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2020, 03:24:53 am »
Another one:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/tanker-spills-crude-oil-indian-ocean-mauritius-environmental-disaster-085718631.html

Quote
Tanker spills 1,000 tonnes of crude oil into Indian Ocean near Mauritius in environmental disaster

This is what Western civilization does to oceans:







« Last Edit: August 11, 2020, 03:28:58 am by 90sRetroFan »

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2020, 09:02:58 pm »
Air Pollution Is Making COVID-19 Worse, Scientists Say
Quote
Scientists say that air pollution is making COVID-19 worse — and the Trump administration isn’t helping.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZK_Mm8XJIQ&feature=youtu.be

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Re: Western civilization is a health hazard
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2020, 05:32:22 pm »
Humans Killed 68 Percent of Wildlife in 50 Years
Quote
Humans Killed 68 Percent of Wildlife in 50 Years

Two Major reports recently released show just how much of an impact human activity has had on wildlife. The World Wildlife Fund released a study that suggests in the last 50 years human activity destroyed global wildlife populations by 68 percent.

The United Nations also released a report that said all 196 countries that signed into the Aichi Biodiversity Targets in 2010 failed to meet a single goal put forth at limiting the collapse of biodiversity across the globe.

Both reports used Covid-19 as an example of what can happen when there is a loss of global biodiversity. As humans continue to disrupt ecosystems, we see more disease jump from animals to humans.

The UN report did however have a few positive notes, in Pakistan where a program to save snow leopards has shown great success, as well as a program in Japan to save the crested ibis from extinction.
https://www.youtube.com/post/Ugyo7CiZX8q854LAfeV4AaABCQ

And yet humanity keeps adding more people to this problematic equation. Insanity!


Eileen Crist: Confronting Anthropocentrism
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZkFj9uPKXo