Author Topic: China and United States Relations  (Read 7402 times)

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China and United States Relations
« on: July 03, 2020, 10:14:35 pm »
US defense chief slams China as rising threat to world order
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MUNICH (AP) — U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper on Saturday cast China as a rising threat to world order — saying the world’s most populous nation steals Western know-how, intimidates smaller neighbors and seeks an “advantage by any means and at any cost.”

A frequent critic of China, Esper used an address to an international security conference in Munich, Germany, to give his most comprehensive condemnation yet of a communist country that he said tops the Pentagon’s list of potential adversaries, followed by Russia, “rogue states” like North Korea and Iran, and continuing threats from extremist groups.
https://apnews.com/07b8744fa239890c83222d2a4ee5c7d9

US defence chief: China is the biggest threat to world order
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDRoY2PQsGg

As far as we know though China has never put bounties on American soldiers heads as Russia apparently has, nor has China attacked America twice as Israel clearly has. Yet, Israel remains the U.S.' top ally even though the majority of Jews in Israel are of Russian decent. Could the U.S. political establishment be any more foolish? Can westerners be anymore ignorant than they currently are?

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90sRetroFan

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2020, 12:37:00 am »
OLD CONTENT

www.yahoo.com/news/gop-senator-says-china-blame-213159255.html

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WASHINGTON — Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, drew a backlash on social media and from Asian American advocates on Wednesday for claiming China was "to blame" for the spread of the coronavirus because of a "culture where people eat bats and snakes and dogs and things like that."

'These viruses are transmitted from the animal to the people and that's why China has been the source of a lot of these viruses like SARS, like MERS, the Swine flu, and now the coronavirus, so I think they have a fundamental problem, the Texas Republican said to reporters
...
Swine flu was first detected in the United States in 2009, and MERS was first identified in Jordan in 2012, according to the CDC.
...
"Swine Flu didn’t even originate in China. It started here in the United States, where we eat pigs," wrote former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti.
...
"Can we go back to when being racist in public wasn’t cool?" said Democratic attorney and politician Bakari Sellers on Twitter.

Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., the chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, called Cornyn’s comments “disgusting” and an attempt to “shift attention away from President Trump's truncated response” to the coronavirus pandemic.

I hope that, in the same way that support for Israel went from bipartisan a decade ago to primarily a Red position today thanks to our activism, so too can hostility towards China move from bipartisan today (such that most Blue politicians today feel a need to prove their credentials by declaring how hostile they are towards China) to a Red-only position in the near future. To this end, all Blue public defence of China in response (such as above) to Red attacks should be praised and encouraged.

Flashback:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6dEMQ624wM

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I suspect many leftists even secretly sympathize with China, given the aforementioned racist comments by Trump

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"Here is an example of a False Leftist purportedly “defending” China, by citing Xi’s election victory as evidence of the democratic nature of the regime."

The problem is that Singh is only repeating the Xi's own line: Xi himself frequently claims that China is "democratic" (and worse, "more democratic" than Western countries)! Instead of taking pride in China being the last major holdout for autocracy in the whole world, Xi seems to want to redefine the term "democratic" to describe China's system of government! This is extremely buffoonish. Not only does it waste its present chance to vaunt the superiority of autocracy and thus commence the long-awaited counterrevolution against democracy, but it also fails to convince actual democrats (e.g. Hong Kong rightists) and instead merely supplies them with easy ammo with which to accuse the Xi of gaslighting.

"Democratic" is not a synonym for "good". But Xi will never understand this (you can tell this just from his clothes).

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"If China is democratized it’s over."

If China starts having popular vote it is definitely over. But even if it does not, the very fact that it feels the need to call itself "democratic" (though without popular vote) is still a sign that it is in rhetorical retreat.

Unlike the False Left which merely follows Xi's rhetoric claiming to be "democratic" (though without popular vote), the True Left approach to positivity towards China should more often involve educating people about pre-modern Chinese rulers (who were autocratic and proud of it).

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We are actually not all that far off from achieving partisanship on attitudes towards China:

www.yahoo.com/news/more-half-americans-think-china-150800626.html

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nearly 90 percent of Republicans believe China, where the coronavirus originated, is responsible for the spread while two-thirds of Democrats surveyed said the same.
...
Among GOP voters, 71 percent think China has a responsibility to compensate other countries for the damage the pandemic has caused. Fewer than half of Democrats agree with that sentiment, but the 41 percent who do is not an insignificant amount.

Going by the second statistic, we already have a partisan split comparable in degree to the current Red-Blue split on Israel vs Palestine.

Even going by the less optimistic first statistic, just another 17% Blue flip is needed.

Now is the time to use every available opportunity to preach to Blues the vision of a US-China alliance, specifically as the best counterstrategy to Duginism. Once we get the split, every time Blues see Reds attack China, it will only cause them to defend China more (which will then further annoy the Reds), whereupon the remaining polarization will occur by itself.

Relevant:

www.quora.com/Why-dont-the-United-States-and-China-form-an-alliance

www.uscpfa.org/about-uscpfa

uschinainnovation.org/about-ucia/

asiasociety.org/files/pdf/US_China_Roadmap_on_Climate_Change.pdf

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"What about the non-aligned movement?"

We would like to include most NAM countries (notable exception: Myanmar).

"I notice China is designated as an observer country in the NAM...."

This at least puts it closer to NAM than Russia.

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us.yahoo.com/news/trump-ad-suggests-campaign-strategy-141858669.html

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“During America’s crisis, Biden protected China’s feelings,” the online ad says, presenting a montage of clips of Biden complimenting and praising the Chinese, including the country’s leader, Xi Jinping, and of a news segment accusing Biden of helping his son Hunter profit off Chinese investments.

The ad also includes an image of a smiling Biden standing alongside an Asian American man — an apparent attempt to suggest that the former president has an inappropriately cozy relationship with China.

The correct response from Biden would be to embrace the accusation that he is friendly towards China, and arguing why this is precisely what is needed in 21st century geopolitics, thereby turning the accusation into a compliment.

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The Duginism map:



This alone is a strong argument for a US-China alliance as the foundation of any serious anti-Duginist movement. From there we must shore up the UK and Turkey, and then ensure that Russia gets as few as possible of the allies Dugin wants, which should be highly achievable via the combined persuasive power of the US and China, but which would be much harder with the US and China refusing to collaborate.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 12:42:09 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2020, 12:54:53 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

At least some people are trying to think positively:

foreignpolicy.com/2020/04/06/united-states-china-coronavirus-pandemic-tensions/

Quote
Could the Pandemic Ease U.S.-China Tensions?

Against a backdrop of tariffs, 5G, and weakening diplomacy, COVID-19 might be a rare chance for the two countries to come together—if they can listen to their better angels
...
Between the two countries, China and the United States have vast capital and human resources. To stave off global economic collapse, and help fast-track lifesaving medical research, they must come together now, both through bilateral collaboration and in leading a more effective global response.
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The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s robust technical assistance program on infectious diseases in China, which was dramatically scaled back in 2018 as a result of budget cuts, should be restored and expanded. So too should work under the 2016 memorandum of understanding in which the two countries agreed jointly to provide public health and disease control training in Africa—where in recent months the United States has sought to block China from building the headquarters of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Lastly, Washington should invite Beijing to co-chair an action task force on COVID-19 under the Global Health Security Agenda, a multilateral public-private initiative focused on combating infectious disease.
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As this year’s host of the G-7 group of advanced economies, the United States should invite China to join virtual meetings to coordinate strategies to limit the damage from COVID-19 and prepare for rapid economic recovery.
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The United States should work with the International Monetary Fund, the European Union, and Japan to help China work out arrangements to relieve or forgive the massive debt it holds in the most vulnerable developing countries. The United States can assist in retooling existing projects to build desperately needed public health infrastructure, particularly given America’s strength in medical services, software, and expeditionary medicine.
...
These suggested steps, albeit modest, would go a long way in reversing the negative course in U.S.-China relations. Both countries have experienced and competent ambassadors supported by professional staff. A good starting point would be for the two teams to agree on a menu of options for bilateral cooperation that the leaders could discuss. Joint action would allow both countries to show leadership at a critical time in history, when many smaller nations are increasingly vulnerable. And each of these measures could build some needed trust between Beijing and Washington, setting the stage for progress on other issues.

www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202004/04/WS5e884179a3101282172846c7.html

Quote
Susan Shirk, chair of the 21st Century China Center and professor emeritus at the GPS of the UC San Diego, said this global health challenge required global solutions, which must involve coordination between the world's two largest economies.

"We are going to need a massive international effort on multiple fronts to help developing countries deal with the epidemic, develop a vaccine, and then vaccinate billions of people. Other nations will be hesitant to act unless they are convinced the United States and China are on the same page," she said in a statement posted on the university's website.

A group of Chinese academics had previously called for cooperation between Beijing and Washington to beat COVID-19.

"Political bickering does nothing to contribute to the healthy development of Sino-US relations, nor will it help the people of the world to rationally and accurately understand and cope with the pandemic," said the group of 100 Chinese scholars in an open letter published on Thursday in the online news magazine, The Diplomat.
...
In response to the letter of Chinese scholars, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said Friday that more "rational, calm and positive" voices are needed at the current stage of COVID-19.

So does it appear that a Blue US or a Red US can best make the above happen?

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvFCCs2WiFw

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More China bashing from Weinstein (Jew):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyRZeemK03s

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSDnEU9tO9A

Good answer, unfortunately spoiled by the Eurocentric clothes.

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Eurocentric clothing is obviously an attempt by Chinese leaders to convey the message that they are more "diplomatic", but who decides what is or isn't diplomatic? Answer: Westerners. So, therefore, by adopting Eurocentric clothing, Chinese leaders are automatically accepting that they will be subservient to the West in any diplomatic encounters, and thus cave in to their every demand.

in the PR war Eurocentric clothing will convey the message that China is more open to adopting a Western form of government and thus will make it more susceptible to Zionist infiltrators who outwardly promote diplomacy with China, such as Max Blumenthal (Jew), but who seek to eventually democratize China.

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us.yahoo.com/news/chinese-ambassador-u-urges-serious-060929750.html

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(Bloomberg) -- The Chinese ambassador to the U.S. called for a “serious rethinking” of relations between the world’s biggest economies in the face of the global coronavirus pandemic.

“I think I should be hoping for more than just a pause in tensions, but really a serious rethinking of the very foundations of this important relationship,” Cui Tiankai said in response to a question on U.S.-China ties during a Bloomberg New Economy webcast on Tuesday.
...
Cui has emerged as a voice of caution on U.S.-China relations. In March, he distanced himself from tweets by foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian, who speculated that the U.S. Army may have brought the virus to Wuhan. Cui described such speculation as “very harmful” and said investigations of the virus’s origin were best left to scientists. Zhao has since stopped promoting such claims.
...
Cui added that China’s development has not come at the expense of the U.S., saying China wants “nothing to do with U.S. domestic politics, we can’t even make sense of it,” in response to a question on who China would prefer to win the presidential election in November.

I would say Cui is the one who needs to do some serious rethinking.

Firstly, he should stop thinking of the US as a single entity. Instead he should start thinking of the US as Red vs Blue , and figuring out which one is more likely to have a more positive relationship with China (Answer: Blue). Thus China should absolutely have a preference regarding who wins the 2020 election (Answer: the Blue candidate).

Secondly, Zhao said nothing "harmful". Cui only thinks it is harmful because he interprets Zhao's speculation as an attack on the US as a whole. It is not. When the US Army brought the virus to Wuhan, it was under the Trump administration. Therefore Zhao is only attacking the Red part of the US. Cui's job should be to emphasize that China will not lump in the Blue part of the US to blame for this, and thus not only do Blue supporters have nothing to fear from China, but it would actually benefit them to join in the attack on Red supporters.

Good relations between China and the US will not happen without Blue predominance. But the longer China ignores the Red vs Blue conflict instead of outspokenly supporting the Blue struggle, the higher the chances even a future Blue-predominant US will be unenthusiastic about good relations with China. This is what Cui should be thinking about carefully.

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More people are now saying what I was saying earlier about Biden:

www.chinausfocus.com/foreign-policy/us-faces-a-hard-choice-about-china

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What should Joe Biden do?

Now that former vice-president Joe Biden has become Trump’s presumptive opponent, it will be necessary for Biden and his campaign team to take a top to bottom evaluation on where various issues stand.

The Trump campaign has already fired the first volley, accusing Biden of being too close to China and, not incidentally, the campaign clip also took a xenophobic swipe at Americans of Chinese ancestry. The New York Times said: “The ad, which calls Joe Biden soft on China and falsely suggests a former governor of Washington is Chinese, shows that President Trump plans to continue exploiting racial discord in his re-election bid.”

The one-minute spot was loaded with cheap shots designed to mislead and fool the uninformed. As vice-president, Biden made official visits to Beijing. Footage of his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping suggested something unsavory and implied that then ambassador Gary Locke accompanying Biden was a Chinese official.

As the election campaign heats up, Biden can expect a piling on of TV spots that will accuse him of being in Beijing’s pocket. With Steve Bannon, a master of misdirection and misinformation, advising Trump’s campaign, being close to China will just be one of the issues Biden will have to deal with.

What should Biden do to counter? Should he counter by arguing that he is as anti-China as Trump or even more rabid? Surely that would put him on the defensive and exercising a losing strategy.

Instead, Biden should articulate an approach with China as diametrically different from Trump as possible.
Talk about global trade rather than a tariff war, collaboration on battling the pandemic, joint leadership on climate change and a mutual contribution to the financial stability of the world. Those would be some of the major issues that expose Trump’s failure to deliver for the American people.

Biden’s job is to take a bold stand and explain to voters that working with China would boost the global economy, including the US. Conversely, by continuing on Trump’s trajectory of treating China as an adversary and decoupling from each other, the economy of both countries would shrink and assure a losing future for the people of America, and for the world.

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www.chinausfocus.com/foreign-policy/a-look-at-the-china-us-russia-triangle

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Today both China and Russia feel more than ever that they need to strengthen strategic coordination to deal with pressure from the United States. Although the two countries’ static inferiority against the U.S. in terms of physical power has significantly improved because of the China factor, their dynamic inferiority remains unchanged. In other words, neither China nor Russia can provide each other with strong enough support to mitigate American pressure in areas where it is most needed.

For example, Russia cannot provide China with a domestic market of billions of dollars, much less with advanced industrial technologies. And China cannot support Russia in the battlefields of Ukraine or Syria or provide it with sufficient development funding to counteract sanctions.

www.chinausfocus.com/foreign-policy/where-are-china-russia-relations-heading-

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Exchanges between the Chinese and Russian people, especially young people, are insufficient, and there is not much deep-level cooperation between universities. The number of international exchange students from China and U.S. who study in the counterpart country is much larger than the number between China and Russia.

In addition, there is insufficient trust regarding the Belt and Road Initiative. China-Russia cooperation in this regard has progressed slowly, even though China has made rapid progress in Central Asian countries.

www.chinausfocus.com/foreign-policy/sino-american-and-russian-relations-president-trumps-unilateral-actions-in-the-middle-east-helped-china-to-replace-the-us-as-the-force-for-good

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Similar to the Sino-Iranian relationship built on trade, weapons, and oil, China has now emerged as the strongest collaborator with Iraq. A partner of President Xi Jinping’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), Iraq’s total trade with China exceeded $30 billion in 2018. China is the largest trading partner of Iraq and the second biggest importer of Iraq’s oil.

During his visit to Beijing in September 2019, Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi said that China will be “a quantum leap” in Sino-Iraqi relations after the two countries signed eight comprehensive agreements on culture, defense, diplomacy, education, finance, reconstruction, security, and trade. Unlike the Russia–Syria–Iran–Iraq coalition with reactions to the White House’s unpredictable actions, China’s inroads into Iraq had deliberately been planned and engaged in bilateral diplomacy through the BRI framework.

With the latest US-Iran escalation, China certainly foresees greater opportunities to expand its influence in the region. For many – including former CIA director Michael Hayden – Trump is either a “Russian asset” or a “useful idiot,” as the consequences of the president’s decisions in Iraq have now become welcome news for Bagdad and Teheran to make Washington less important to the regional stakeholders, except for Israel.

The answer is staring us in the face. All it takes is an adjustment in perspective. A US-China alliance would be good for everyone except Russia and Israel. Which is what we want.

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"Then why is it that I keep hearing about Chinese-Israeli tech cooperation?"

Because of the lack of Chinese-American tech cooperation! China's reliance on Israel for tech can be short-circuited overnight if only the US were willing to become Israel's rival partner to China, deliberately offering better deals to China than Israel is willing to offer!

This is same logic as what I had to explain to Ingrid back on the old blog years ago:

aryanism.net/blog/aryan-sanctuary/facing-muspellheimr/comment-page-1/#comment-168583

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Syria has been forced to depend on Russian intervention because it has lacked BETTER allies than Russia (which is just in there for its own interests). If another military power been willing to intervene in Syria in support of Assad sooner than Russia had intervened, then the Russian intervention would have been unnecessary. What the Russian intervention demonstrates is not Russia's goodwill, but Syria's lack of choices. Therefore we should not be praising Russian intervention, but should be encouraging other countries to RIVAL Russia in being pro-Assad.

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Our enemies recently wrote an article where even they effectively admit that China has never been "stealing" technology as such, but rather scavenging:

www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2020/04/18/beating-us-with-our-own-weapons/

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two Chinese information specialists, Huo Zhongwen and Wang Zongxiao, published a 361–page book entitled Sources and Methods of Obtaining National Defense Science and Technology Intelligence. The book candidly describes the structure and methods of China’s open source S&T information gathering system. Among the sources discussed are the Congressional Information Service, the US National Technical Information Service (NTIS), NASA, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Department of Energy and the Lockheed Corporation.

Huo and Wang blandly acknowledge that

there are similarities between what we refer to as ‘information’ and what the foreign intelligence community refers to as intelligence work. … By picking here and there among the vast amount of public materials and accumulating information a drop at a time, often it is possible to basically reveal the outlines of some secret intelligence, and this is particularly true in the case of the Western countries.

Huo and Wang give examples of discoveries of which they are especially proud. One involves the mining of declassified documents from Los Alamos National Laboratory:

[American agents] reviewed a total of 388,000 documents in 33 days, so each reviewer had to review around 1000 documents a day, about two a minute. The pace of the reviews resulted in a large number of errors—around five percent—that is, some 19,400 documents that were mistakenly declassified, and of these there were at least eight highly secret items regarding thermonuclear weapons.

Not only is this entirely ethical, but the best thing about it is that it reduces the incentive for innovation by making it harder for innovation to produce (as paleocons aim) a geopolitical advantage exclusively to the innovating country. This should help put some brakes on this:

https://trueleft.createaforum.com/true-left-vs-right/if-western-civilization-does-not-die-soon/

buying us more time to persuade the world ideologically that we shouldn't even want so many machines in the first place.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9KETUBNaCk

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www.france24.com/en/20200406-brazil-minister-offends-china-with-racist-virus-tweet

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China demanded an explanation from Brazil Monday after the far-right government's education minister linked the coronavirus pandemic to the Asian country's "plan for world domination," in a tweet imitating a Chinese accent.

In the latest incident to strain ties between Brasilia and Beijing, Education Minister Abraham Weintraub insinuated China was behind the global health crisis.
...
In the original Portuguese, his tweet substituted the letter "r" with capital "L" -- "BLazil" instead of "Brazil," for example -- in a style commonly used to mock a Chinese accent.

In case you are wondering, yes:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Weintraub

Quote
Weintraub was born in São Paulo into a Jewish family.

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Our enemies make our case for us:

www.gatestoneinstitute.org/15944/afghanistan-china-moving-in

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Beijing has deftly maintained low-key but friendly relations with the Taliban since the Islamic movement assumed power in Kabul in 1996. Only China and Pakistan kept their ties with the Taliban when American and Northern Alliance forces drove the terrorist group from power in the autumn of 2001.

China is now the foremost foreign source of investment in Afghanistan. China, for instance, has gained access to three separate oil fields in the Afghan provinces of Sari-i-pul and Faryab and has also invested heavily in extracting copper and iron ore from Afghanistan.

China, however, seems to be hedging its bets. It remains a supplier of weapons to the Taliban through the third-party services of Iran. Both the United Kingdom and the U.S. State Department have complained to China about the free flow of Chinese weapons to Iran, which then wind up with the Taliban. These include surface-to-air missiles, rocket-propelled grenades, artillery shells and land mines. In fact, as early as 2007, British Royal Marines intercepted a ten-ton cache of Chinese weapons left for the Taliban by the Iranians in Herat Province, Afghanistan, which borders on Iran.
...
China developed early ties to Afghan jihadists by sending them weapons to fight the Russians after the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in late December 1979. The Chinese Ambassador to Pakistan also established close ties with the Taliban in 2000, during a meeting in Kandahar, Afghanistan with the group's leader, Mullah Omar. The Taliban, in turn, pledged to protect Chinese investment projects in Afghanistan. China's $3 billion copper mine investment at Mes Aynak in Afghanistan's Logar Province remains under the Taliban's protection.

Bear in mind that, during the Cold War, the US and Afghanistan were allies too! Thus the US and China were on the same side when it came to opposing Russia. This is what we need to get back to.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 12:59:09 am by 90sRetroFan »

90sRetroFan

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2020, 01:14:40 am »
OLD CONTENT contd.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-france-lab/france-says-no-evidence-covid-19-linked-to-wuhan-research-lab-idUSKBN21Z2ME

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Cuomo seems to see that the "outcompete the Reds in blaming China" approach is wrong:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRbfKzLl1Qc

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A positive article dating from before the current crisis, which shows how much relations have worsened in just the last few months:

www.huffpost.com/entry/us-china-relations-kevin-rudd-report_b_7096784

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a core geopolitical fact emerging from the report is that we are now seeing the rise of what Evan Feigenbaum has described as “two Asias”: an “economic Asia” that is increasingly dominated by China; and a “security Asia” that remains dominated by the United States. China is now a bigger trading partner with every country in Asia than the United States. The U.S. is either an ally or strategic partner of the bulk of maritime Asia. By contrast, China’s only strategic “ally” is North Korea, which has become a greater strategic liability than an asset. If strategic tensions drove the U.S. and China into adversarial postures, regional states would face increasingly irresistible pressure to make a zero sum strategic choice between the two.
...
The report argues that the time is ripe to consider alternative institutional approaches that integrate both China and the U.S. into a common regional arrangement, and with a mandate to tackle both security and economic challenges. If competing structures are established, these will exacerbate regional division. Furthermore, the report argues that any explicit attempt to exclude the U.S. from the regional security architecture is more likely to strengthen existing U.S. military alliances, rather than weaken them. Rather than playing an institutional tug-of-war, it would be far more constructive for the U.S. and China to join hands in building pan-regional institutional arrangements. This will not solve all regional security challenges. But it will help to manage, and reduce, them over time. Confidence-building measures could cascade into a more transparent security culture and, in time, a more secure Asia. But this can only happen if both powers decide to invest common capital into a common regional institution. Otherwise, we really do find ourselves in the world of the “zero sum game.”
...
Before “détente,” in the latter period of the Cold War, a joint narrative between the U.S. and the Soviet Union was not possible. Both sides were not only ideological enemies. They were declared military enemies. They fought proxy wars. And they were in a permanent state of readiness to go to war directly, and in extremis, to destroy one another in a nuclear exchange. Over time, however, the U.S. and the Soviet Union did develop basic protocols to avoid crises and unintended confrontation.

By contrast, despite the difficulties, the U.S.-China relationship remains in decidedly positive territory. Since 1972, U.S.-China relations have remained more functional than those between the U.S. and the Soviet Union ever were, and have never escalated to a comparable level of hostility. As noted above, both China and the United States have private and semi-public strategic narratives about each other. But as yet they do not have a shared strategic narrative between each other. Such a common strategic narrative for U.S.-China relations may be difficult, but it is certainly not impossible. And given the stakes involved for the future, it is increasingly necessary.

A common strategic framework for U.S.-China relations would offer many advantages.

First, in Washington, it would help provide strategic direction to government agencies competing for policy attention and space, as well as those multiple agencies engaged in aspects of the China relationship but not on a daily basis, thereby helping to provide policy coherence in engaging on an inter- agency basis, as well as with Chinese interlocutors;
Second, in Beijing it would go beyond that because of the more hierarchical nature of the political and bureaucratic decision-making process, providing direction to the system at large; and
Third, for both powers, a coherent strategic framework would also inject additional positive ingredients: a common determination to manage significant differences effectively in order to avoid unnecessary confrontation; a common commitment to collaborate in difficult policy areas with a view to resolving them; and a common sense of purpose to build political capital and strategic trust over time.

For these reasons, the report argues that the ideational content of a common strategic framework for the relationship should be: “realist” about those areas of the relationship which are not possible to resolve within the foreseeable future; “constructive” about those areas that could be resolved with high-level political effort at the bilateral, regional and global levels; and guided by a “common purpose” to build strategic trust, step by step, over time, not based on declaratory statements, but instead on common action in resolving common problems.

It goes without saying that the strategic narrative should be based around anti-Duginism.

By the way, do you guys remember how back in the Counterculture era US-China cooperation was a theme in pop culture?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_B27Avb1mY

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if a US-China alliance is able to form, Japan, Australia, etc. will no longer be placed in a position such that friendliness towards China is perceived as hostility towards the US (as above). Literally everyone benefits except Duginists.

At the moment in the US, only academics seem willing to say what Blue politicians should be saying:

www.globaltimes.cn/content/1187744.shtml

Quote
I think the big question has to do with the role of good government. Who can provide the kind of government and leadership that is needed in a crisis situation like this? So far, countries in eastern Asia have done much better than what Europe and the US have done. I'm not sure if that has to do with the system of government. I wonder if it has more to do with political culture than actual political systems.

Not many Americans have lived in China for a long period of time and been able to see China from the inside. And likewise, not many Chinese people are able to see the US from the inside. Therefore, I think they often imagine on both sides that the other country is much more different from themselves. That is actually the case. Many Americans see China as a more successful variation of the Soviet Union. But in reality, since I've lived in both countries, I can say that China today is miles away from what was the Soviet Union.
...
My view has always been that the most important thing is for the two countries to find things that they can cooperate on. It's simply not true that the US and China have opposite interests on every issue. With regard to the control of global epidemics and climate change, both countries do have similar interests.

I suspect that another reason why the US is much more hostile towards China than vice versa is because of relative lack of American familiarity with Chinese pop culture compared to the other way round. Whereas there are countless Chinese fans of Marvel/DC superheroes, for example, there are far fewer American fans of wuxia. I believe one of the best vehicles towards improving US-China relations would be to promote Chinese pop culture in the US.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGNTMma8Fiw

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBpp2bzehtM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9hEQCHCEzM

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It is annoying how incompetent China is at PR:

www.tribuneindia.com/news/comment/chinas-anxieties-reveal-schism-89568

Quote
On April 24, China’s biggest government think tank, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) published in its China Social Science Journal a lengthy 3,152-character report analysing US media attacks against China during the Covid-19 pandemic. Published only in Chinese, it identified six main characteristics of the US media ‘slandering and denigrating China’ and said Beijing needs to prepare for future propaganda wars against China during major emergencies.

The CASS report recommended six steps for winning ‘public opinion battles’. Among them are: coordinating with government media, private media, diplomats, enterprises and think tanks to coordinate quick and effective counter-attacks; use all channels including social media and mobilise companies, think tanks, foreign scholars and experts who are ‘China-friendly’ to speak and write articles on foreign platforms; and hire and train people to write op-ed articles in foreign languages and ‘borrow’ think-tank experts and foreign journalists to edit Chinese state media abroad.

These "steps" all pertain to mere logistics, which should be the job of administrators, not of think-tanks. What a think-tank is supposed to offer is advice about narrative. If there is no consistent underlying narrative, two quick counterattacks can easily clash and make both seem disingenuous. If there is no consistent underlying narrative, the more channels you use the more confused your message becomes. If there is no consistent underlying narrative, multilingual presentation will worsen all existing confusion.

What is China's narrative?

(Hint: if China wants good relations with the US, China must convince the US that the two countries have a common enemy.)

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2020, 07:15:15 pm »
The Point: Who is the root cause of China-U.S. tensions?
Quote
China-U.S. tensions are heating up. We hear from former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, and British Scholar Martin Jacques, to unpack the root of the problem.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1PQOy8arr4

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2020, 09:24:43 pm »
Zhao Lijian: 'You are buying FBI's words?'
Quote
On July 8 2020, Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Zhao Lijian said that China regrets that U.S. foreign policy have been "kidnapped by FBI officials like Wray and other anti-China forces." The spokesperson added that Wray's words are "full of political lies in negligence of basic facts, exposing their deep-seated Cold-War mindset and ideological bias."
Quote
In the regular press conference, he urged certain U.S. officials to rectify their mistakes and stop issuing erroneous remarks on China, which undermine the two countries relationship.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zuf7fpa2J8I

90sRetroFan

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2020, 12:09:16 am »
Quote
Wang Yi: China will not, and cannot, be another U.S.

Again I am calling Wang an idiot. I sincerely want a China-US alliance, but I am not under the delusion that such an alliance is possible without identifying an explicit enemy which this alliance is purposed to destroy, yet this identification is precisely what Wang disparages as "binary thinking" (more accurately, dualistic thinking):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dualistic_cosmology#Moral_dualism

Yet how can you genuinely ally with a country that believes in dualism without believing in dualism yourself? Successfully allying with the US requires wholeheartedly embracing dualism but building a narrative that places both countries on the same side of the duality and the enemy on the opposite side.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 12:24:14 am by 90sRetroFan »

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2020, 03:29:56 pm »
China vows retaliation against US over Hong Kong sanctions
Quote
China has said it would retaliate after US President Donald Trump ordered an end to preferential trade treatment for Hong Kong and signed legislation allowing sanctions over Beijing's enactment of a draconian security law in the semi-autonomous city.
In a statement on Wednesday, China's foreign ministry said it "firmly opposes and strongly condemns" the Hong Kong Autonomy Act, which unanimously passed the US Congress earlier this month and approves sanctions on Chinese officials and banks over Beijing's clampdown in Hong Kong.
"China will make necessary responses to protect its legitimate interests, and impose sanctions on relevant US personnel and entities," the ministry added, without elaborating.
The Chinese warning came amid mounting tensions with the United States - not just over Hong Kong - but also over trade, the global coronavirus pandemic, China's military buildup in the South China Sea and its treatment of Uighur Muslims in the western region of Xinjiang.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUEwjqBWFII

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2020, 10:51:32 pm »
Cui Tiankai: Keeping China-U.S. relations on the right track is the most important
Quote
The current state of China-U.S. relations, which have been characterized by its deterioration, has been compared to driving a car. The United States has been stepping on "accelerator" while China has been stepping on "brake."

The Chinese ambassador to the U.S., Cui Tiankai, said right now the most important thing to do is to hold the steering wheel so that the car can go in the right direction.

Cui made the remarks during an interview with China Central Television (CCTV).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QclZve1hV1M

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2020, 10:37:31 am »
Beijing to close U.S. Consulate-General in Chengdu
Quote
China has ordered the U.S. to shut its consulate in southwest China's Chengdu, days after Washington unilaterally asked Beijing to close China's consulate in Houston. Beijing strongly condemned the move and made specific requirements on the ceasing of all operations and events by the U.S. Consulate General in Chengdu.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJOH12UDYZA

acc9

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2020, 06:41:38 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27aljWX4jzk
 
A US documentary produced 70+ years ago on the background to China being invaded by Japan during WW2. After watching this, I'm convinced that China is not a country that would wage an imperial war. I believe China's present rise to power is to strengthen her defense so the nation would not have to suffer again from the brutality of war.

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2020, 10:21:37 am »
China's Pushback: Beijing questions Western reporting on Xinjiang
Quote
Despite China's best efforts, journalists are finding innovative ways to tell the story of the mass internment of Uighur Muslims in the Xinjiang province.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pt70rSML8Es

CGTN Exclusive: Western propaganda on Xinjiang 'camps' rebutted
Quote
China's westernmost Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region is a multi-ethnic and multi-religious region. It's difficult enough to understand its complexity to begin with and Western propaganda didn't make things any easier. CGTN has traveled to the heart of Xinjiang and busted four myths manufactured by Western media regarding Xinjiang and the so-called "re-education camps."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wb-MNi8E-TA

guest5

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2020, 01:13:55 pm »
Let's talk about Houston and intelligence....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC-0El3LvUw

acc9

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2020, 07:03:18 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wd9R46K1ZeA

The US has a major role to play in the dispute regarding sovereignty of the Diaoyu Islands between China and Japan.

acc9

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Re: China and United States Relations
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2020, 06:12:21 am »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-53633315

Typical Mafia
Donald Trump: US Treasury should get cut of Tik Tok deal